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Re: [equineveterinarymedicine] Strangles

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  • Alexis Geiger
    I don t normally post here BUT I do have LOADS of experience with Strangles... Unless your vet feels that your horses have ANOTHER type of infection please
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 31, 2008
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      I don't normally post here BUT I do have LOADS of experience with Strangles...  Unless your vet feels that your horses have ANOTHER type of infection please DON'T give antibiotics!!  It will make things worse!  My mare developed Bastard strangles after an unknowing vet put her on some major antibiotics and now I have have to deal with it yearly (and when she is under any stress) with her and then with any horse in the barn that hasn't had it before...  RuralHeritage.com has a great *list* that should help...  They do say in last resort use antibiotics but that should be a LAST resort...  Hope it helps..  Good Luck, My farm was under quarantine for almost a year when we first started, Cleaning is your best hope..
       
      "Treatment
      Depending on the case's severity, Dr. Goetz suggests three treatment options:
      1. For a mild case, don't do anything; let the disease run its course. Lymph nodes may swell, burst, and drain. If the lymph nodes do not drain on their own, ask a veterinarian to lance them. Do not lance them yourself or you run the risk of severing vital nerves or vessels.

      2. A horse that becomes more clinically ill and stops eating and drinking requires supportive care. Take measures to lower the fever and reduce the pain, but don't give antibiotics.

      3. If the horse develops complications, antibiotics may be needed. "Refrigerator-cold injections once or twice a day for 21 days are going to give this horse a sore neck and sore leg," says Dr. Goetz. "The horse may have trouble putting its neck down to eat, and other problems may develop from treatment. Despite these negative aspects, antibiotics may be necessary to save the horse's life." Horses with complications may get a guttural pouch infection, abdominal lymph node infection (bastard strangles), vascular inflammation (purpura hemorragica), and even skin sloughing, but these complications are rare.

      Because strangles is highly infective, risk of an outbreak is always present, especially with young horses. The disease may be spread when puss from the nose or burst abscesses gets on water troughs, feed buckets, brushes, driving lines, other equipment, or you.

       

      In the event of an outbreak, Dr. Goetz prefers treatment options 1 and 2, but has resorted to antibiotics. "In a large outbreak you could separate the less severe cases and treat them with the first two options, or you could bite the bullet and treat them all. Quite a few years back a 30-pony farm had an outbreak of strangles. At first I worried we'd be treating them for 2 to 3 months. We decided to use antibiotics and in 3 weeks it was over and done with. Herd treatment, considering your manpower and financial resources, may be the best way to contain the infection and end the disease without having all your horses go through the breakage and drainage of lymph nodes and having the disease perhaps linger for several months."

      Most horses are not infectious 30 days after the disease has run its course, but some horses may continue to be infective up to 6 months later. If you are concerned about whether a horse is still shedding the bacteria, ask a veterinarian to culture the horse's guttural pouch.

      Cleaning the environment is difficult. Wash everything with soap and a 3:1 mixture of water and bleach. Control pests that spread disease, including flies, rats, and mice.
       

      ~~___(\
      .../< >\

      A Dog looks up to a man,
      A cat looks down on a man,
      But a patient horse looks a man in the eye and sees him as an equal.


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: "Charleston110@..." <charleston110@...>
      To: equineveterinarymedicine@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2008 6:05:16 PM
      Subject: Re: [equineveterinarymedicine] Strangles

      Sabrina, call and ask another vet just to see what they say,. My baby horse has Strangles, but they treated her with Antibits. Good luck my prays are with you
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2008 2:53 PM
      Subject: [equineveterinaryme dicine] Strangles

      Hello all...I don't normally email the list but I have a mess on my
      hands and need some help. I have a case of Strangles on my hands with 8
      horses and have already lost one and it is breaking my heart...they
      have had it for the last 3 to 4 weeks...vet said to just let it run its
      course but now that I have lost one, I am getting very very worried. I
      have them all seperated and am keeping them warm and dry..cleaning
      stalls and buckets out every day. Can anyone give me some advice on how
      to proceed...it seems like they get better and them BOOM here it goes
      again...the vet still said to just let it run it's course but I'm so
      afraid I'm gonna lose them all.
      any advice?
      Thanks
      Sabrina




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    • Ryle Dittmar
      The use of antibiotics has not been proven to cause Bastard Strangles. And in fact, high incidence of Bastard Strangles has been seen in outbreaks where
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 1, 2008
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        The use of antibiotics has not been proven to cause Bastard Strangles. And in fact, high incidence of Bastard Strangles has been seen in outbreaks where antibiotics were not used.  There simply has been no good evidence to back up the belief that Bastard Strangles occurs due to antibiotic use. 
         
        Antibiotic use should be limited to cases where lymph node involvement hasn't occured or where severe symptoms are putting the horse's life at risk, but this is because the use of antibiotics once abcessation has begun will only prolong the course of the disease by slowing the progression of the abcesses. 
         
        Cindy D., RVT
         
         
         
      • Kelly Hall
        Hi Sabrina, I know all to well what you are going through. I was helping a trainer one year when 14 out of 30 got Strangles. Here is what we experienced. My
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 1, 2008
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          Hi Sabrina,
          I know all to well what you are going through.  I was helping a trainer one year when 14 out of 30 got Strangles.  Here is what we experienced.  My trainer had a broken leg so I was doing all the work.  Those that were the worst (ie not eating and running high temps) 7 of them we cultured them to see what strain they had.  Several of the horses that were  there had this for their second time.  One 2 yr old had a mild case and he had received 3 vaccines prior to coming to the farm.  But his 1/2 sister wasn't so lucky.  She was cultured but for some reason the vet never ran the culture.  She ended up with Bastard Strangles.  Like her brother she had received 3 vaccines prior to coming to the barn in her 2 yrs of life.  She didn't make it.  The abscess put a whole in her throat.  She exposed a 15 yr old that never had strangles in his life and he never got any symptoms at all.     Since we cultured we know what Antibiotic to give.  This did help the worst ones.  Who knows what would have happened with the 2 yr old filly had we found out in time what she had. 
          Because of my experience with vaccinated horses getting Strangles in various stages I have decided not to vaccinate mine.  I rather help their immune system stay up to help ward off any exposure.  My foundered Arab was at the farm at the time of the outbreak.  She was waiting to have guttural pouch surgery.  She is fine and did heal from the surgery and her founder.  I never took the chance of giving her vaccines from the exposure to the strangles.   3 different vets warned me about possibly causing another founder.  Side affects of the vaccine.   These vets didn't know each other.
          I hope your horses are on their way to healing.  I am so sorry that you lost one.  One thing I can't stress enough is to only give Antibiotics after the culture shows what is needed. 
           

           

          Kelly Hall

          not a vet, just a horse owner

          www.happyhoofpads.com  

           

           
        • Mac Barksdale
          Saratoga Springs, N.Y. — A strangles outbreak forced the closure of Saratoga Raceway until April 11, according to a recent announcement from the New York
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 27, 2012
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            Saratoga Springs, N.Y. — A strangles outbreak forced the closure of Saratoga Raceway until April 11, according to a recent announcement from the New York State Racing and Wagering Board.

            Equine distemper was confirmed in several horses at the track on March 22. The racetrack immediately began monitoring horses, says Board Chairman John D. Sabini. No horses have died as a result of the outbreak. While Strangles is considered a highly contagious bacterial infection of the upper respiratory tract, it is not inherently life threatening, the board says.

            The board approved a request to cancel live racing at the track until April 11 after consulting with track management, reports Dr. David Smith, state veterinarian and director of Animal Industry at the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Veterinarians will continue monitoring and isolating any infected horses at the track, he says.

            All missed race dates will be made up at a later date, the board reports.
             
             
             

            Dr Mac Barksdale
            10151 University Bvld Ste 118
            Orlando, Florida 32817-1904  USSA
            Cell 407 342 0938  mac.barksdale@...
            www.antibioticfailure.com/drmac    www.drb.my4life.com  
             


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