Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Cover-crop recommendations.

Expand Messages
  • Christine Robins
    Have any folks had experience planting cover-crops this late in the fall? We re having a 40 x 200 strip tilled today, where we plan to plant fruit and nut
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Have any folks had experience planting cover-crops this late in the
      fall? We're having a 40' x 200' strip tilled today, where we plan to
      plant fruit and nut trees next year. It has not been planted for at
      least 50 years. We'll fill the gaps between the trees with
      permaculture-type plants, rather than common annual vegatables.

      It looks like annual ryegrass (not cereal rye) is the most cold-hardy
      possibility. We'd appreciate any suggestions for other alternatives or
      combinations of cover-crops.

      Other info: We live in Corvallis. Latest weather prediction is 10
      days of rainy weather.

      Thanks

      Christine Robins
    • Stephanie Denby
      Fava beans. They withstand the weather, help fix N2 for the next crop, and, if you like fava beans (I don t), also provide food. You can harvest the beans for
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Fava beans. They withstand the weather, help fix N2 for the next crop, and, if you like fava beans (I don't), also provide food. You can harvest the beans for food, animal fodder, or next year's cover. You can till in the plants, or compost them. They are one of my favorite winter cover crops.

        Good luck,

        Steph


        At 09:25 AM 11/1/2008, Christine Robins wrote:

        Have any folks had experience planting cover-crops this late in the
        fall? We're having a 40' x 200' strip tilled today, where we plan to
        plant fruit and nut trees next year. It has not been planted for at
        least 50 years. We'll fill the gaps between the trees with
        permaculture-type plants, rather than common annual vegatables.

        It looks like annual ryegrass (not cereal rye) is the most cold-hardy
        possibility. We'd appreciate any suggestions for other alternatives or
        combinations of cover-crops.

        Other info: We live in Corvallis. Latest weather prediction is 10
        days of rainy weather.

        Thanks

        Christine Robins

      • John Flanery
        They even provide food if you don t like the beans - the greens are tasty in winter.
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 1, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          They even provide food if you don't like the beans - the greens are
          tasty in winter.


          On Sat, 2008-11-01 at 10:24 -0700, Stephanie Denby wrote:
          > Fava beans. They withstand the weather, help fix N2 for the next crop,
          > and, if you like fava beans (I don't), also provide food. You can
          > harvest the beans for food, animal fodder, or next year's cover. You
          > can till in the plants, or compost them. They are one of my favorite
          > winter cover crops.
          >
          > Good luck,
          >
          > Steph
          >
          >
          > At 09:25 AM 11/1/2008, Christine Robins wrote:
          >
          > > Have any folks had experience planting cover-crops this late in the
          > > fall? We're having a 40' x 200' strip tilled today, where we plan
          > > to
          > > plant fruit and nut trees next year. It has not been planted for at
          > > least 50 years. We'll fill the gaps between the trees with
          > > permaculture-type plants, rather than common annual vegatables.
          > >
          > > It looks like annual ryegrass (not cereal rye) is the most
          > > cold-hardy
          > > possibility. We'd appreciate any suggestions for other alternatives
          > > or
          > > combinations of cover-crops.
          > >
          > > Other info: We live in Corvallis. Latest weather prediction is 10
          > > days of rainy weather.
          > >
          > > Thanks
          > >
          > > Christine Robins
          > >
          >
        • Elaine Zablocki
          I d recommend small seeded fava beans... I think they are called bell beans. I grow them every year, and I think they are a wonderful, nitrogen fixing winter
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 1, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            I'd recommend small seeded fava beans... I think they are called bell beans.
            I grow them every year, and I think they are a wonderful, nitrogen
            fixing winter cover crop.
            Steve Solomon recommends them in "Gardening West of the Cascades" (a
            wonderful book... only one suggestion that didn't work, in my experience.)

            Even though it is late in the year, they will make some growth this
            fall and then go up to four or five feet in the spring. I grow them
            in small areas (four feet by eight feet) and it is easy to
            incorporate them in the soil. Since you have a much larger area, you
            might want to cut them or pull them up at an earlier stage...

            I have them already in most of my beds that don't have winter greens,
            but when I take out the tomatoes in a week or two, I will put fava
            beans in that bed too. Because it is late in the season, I do like to
            sprout the seeds first indoors (just the way you would sprout alfalfa
            sprouts) and then sow them outdoors when they are just starting to sprout.

            I buy my seed from Down to Earth, and I think Territorial also
            carries them. Also buy a package of the appropriate innoculant, it
            will cost about $5.

            Because it is late in the season, if those places are out, then see
            if you can find seed at one of the farmer's supply places, or online.

            Here in Eugene, they have never had any problems with winter cold....
            if it gets colder where you are, then you should check the cold
            hardiness of the seed before you buy... I think they are hardy down
            to 10 degrees or so, but I don't remember exactly (don't have time to
            look it up) and it varies by variety.


            At 08:25 AM 11/1/2008, Christine Robins wrote:
            >Have any folks had experience planting cover-crops this late in the
            >fall? We're having a 40' x 200' strip tilled today, where we plan to
            >plant fruit and nut trees next year. It has not been planted for at
            >least 50 years. We'll fill the gaps between the trees with
            >permaculture-type plants, rather than common annual vegatables.
            >
            >It looks like annual ryegrass (not cereal rye) is the most cold-hardy
            >possibility. We'd appreciate any suggestions for other alternatives or
            >combinations of cover-crops.
            >
            >Other info: We live in Corvallis. Latest weather prediction is 10
            >days of rainy weather.
            >
            >Thanks
            >
            >Christine Robins
            >
            >
            >------------------------------------
            >
            >Got an event to publicize? Add it to our publicly-viewable monthly
            >calendar at: www.eugenepermacultureguild.orgYahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
          • Nathaniel Sperry
            Great cover crop website from UC- this leads to bell bean page- more info than you need, but lots if you wanna browse.
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
            • 0 Attachment

               

              Great cover crop website from UC- this leads to bell bean page- more info than you need, but lots if you wanna browse.

               

              http://www.buttecounty.net/bifsnrice/bellbean.htm

               

              Nathaniel Sperry

              605 Howard Ave.

              Eugene OR 97404

              541-461-1737

              541-461-0091 Fax

              nathaniel@...

               

              "The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now."
              ~ Anonymous

               

              From: epguild@yahoogroups.com [mailto:epguild@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Elaine Zablocki
              Sent: Saturday, November 01, 2008 11:48 AM
              To: Christine Robins; epguild@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [epguild] Cover-crop recommendations.

               

              I'd recommend small seeded fava beans... I think they are called bell beans.
              I grow them every year, and I think they are a wonderful, nitrogen
              fixing winter cover crop.
              Steve Solomon recommends them in "Gardening West of the Cascades" (a
              wonderful book... only one suggestion that didn't work, in my experience.)

              Even though it is late in the year, they will make some growth this
              fall and then go up to four or five feet in the spring. I grow them
              in small areas (four feet by eight feet) and it is easy to
              incorporate them in the soil. Since you have a much larger area, you
              might want to cut them or pull them up at an earlier stage...

              I have them already in most of my beds that don't have winter greens,
              but when I take out the tomatoes in a week or two, I will put fava
              beans in that bed too. Because it is late in the season, I do like to
              sprout the seeds first indoors (just the way you would sprout alfalfa
              sprouts) and then sow them outdoors when they are just starting to sprout.

              I buy my seed from Down to Earth, and I think Territorial also
              carries them. Also buy a package of the appropriate innoculant, it
              will cost about $5.

              Because it is late in the season, if those places are out, then see
              if you can find seed at one of the farmer's supply places, or online.

              Here in Eugene, they have never had any problems with winter cold....
              if it gets colder where you are, then you should check the cold
              hardiness of the seed before you buy... I think they are hardy down
              to 10 degrees or so, but I don't remember exactly (don't have time to
              look it up) and it varies by variety.

              At 08:25 AM 11/1/2008, Christine Robins wrote:

              >Have any folks had experience planting cover-crops this late in the
              >fall? We're having a 40' x 200' strip tilled today, where we plan to
              >plant fruit and nut trees next year. It has not been planted for at
              >least 50 years. We'll fill the gaps between the trees with
              >permaculture-type plants, rather than common annual vegatables.
              >
              >It looks like annual ryegrass (not cereal rye) is the most cold-hardy
              >possibility. We'd appreciate any suggestions for other alternatives or
              >combinations of cover-crops.
              >
              >Other info: We live in Corvallis. Latest weather prediction is 10
              >days of rainy weather.
              >
              >Thanks
              >
              >Christine Robins
              >
              >
              >------------------------------------
              >
              >Got an event to publicize? Add it to our publicly-viewable monthly
              >calendar at: www.eugenepermacultureguild.orgYahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >

            • John Flanery
              On the subject of bell beans and Steve Solomon, does anyone have any Sweet Loraine , the variety S.S. selected for good taste? Territorial seems to have
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                On the subject of bell beans and Steve Solomon, does anyone have any
                "Sweet Loraine", the variety S.S. selected for good taste? Territorial
                seems to have stopped carrying it.


                On Sat, 2008-11-01 at 10:48 -0800, Elaine Zablocki wrote:
                > I'd recommend small seeded fava beans... I think they are called bell beans.
                > I grow them every year, and I think they are a wonderful, nitrogen
                > fixing winter cover crop.
                > Steve Solomon recommends them in "Gardening West of the Cascades" (a
                > wonderful book... only one suggestion that didn't work, in my experience.)
                >
                > Even though it is late in the year, they will make some growth this
                > fall and then go up to four or five feet in the spring. I grow them
                > in small areas (four feet by eight feet) and it is easy to
                > incorporate them in the soil. Since you have a much larger area, you
                > might want to cut them or pull them up at an earlier stage...
                >
                > I have them already in most of my beds that don't have winter greens,
                > but when I take out the tomatoes in a week or two, I will put fava
                > beans in that bed too. Because it is late in the season, I do like to
                > sprout the seeds first indoors (just the way you would sprout alfalfa
                > sprouts) and then sow them outdoors when they are just starting to sprout.
                >
                > I buy my seed from Down to Earth, and I think Territorial also
                > carries them. Also buy a package of the appropriate innoculant, it
                > will cost about $5.
                >
                > Because it is late in the season, if those places are out, then see
                > if you can find seed at one of the farmer's supply places, or online.
                >
                > Here in Eugene, they have never had any problems with winter cold....
                > if it gets colder where you are, then you should check the cold
                > hardiness of the seed before you buy... I think they are hardy down
                > to 10 degrees or so, but I don't remember exactly (don't have time to
                > look it up) and it varies by variety.
                >
                >
                > At 08:25 AM 11/1/2008, Christine Robins wrote:
                > >Have any folks had experience planting cover-crops this late in the
                > >fall? We're having a 40' x 200' strip tilled today, where we plan to
                > >plant fruit and nut trees next year. It has not been planted for at
                > >least 50 years. We'll fill the gaps between the trees with
                > >permaculture-type plants, rather than common annual vegatables.
                > >
                > >It looks like annual ryegrass (not cereal rye) is the most cold-hardy
                > >possibility. We'd appreciate any suggestions for other alternatives or
                > >combinations of cover-crops.
                > >
                > >Other info: We live in Corvallis. Latest weather prediction is 10
                > >days of rainy weather.
                > >
                > >Thanks
                > >
                > >Christine Robins
                > >
                > >
                > >------------------------------------
                > >
                > >Got an event to publicize? Add it to our publicly-viewable monthly
                > >calendar at: www.eugenepermacultureguild.orgYahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Got an event to publicize? Add it to our publicly-viewable monthly calendar at: www.eugenepermacultureguild.orgYahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Ben Martin Horst
                I know Dave and Sally DeCou of One Step Forward Farm (near Junction City, I believe) have been growing Sweet Loraine for a number of years. We sell their beans
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 3, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  I know Dave and Sally DeCou of One Step Forward Farm (near Junction
                  City, I believe) have been growing Sweet Loraine for a number of years.
                  We sell their beans in the bulk bin at Sundance. I can't vouch for germ
                  rate, but it's probably worth a shot.

                  Ben

                  John Flanery wrote:
                  >
                  > On the subject of bell beans and Steve Solomon, does anyone have any
                  > "Sweet Loraine", the variety S.S. selected for good taste? Territorial
                  > seems to have stopped carrying it.
                  >
                  > On Sat, 2008-11-01 at 10:48 -0800, Elaine Zablocki wrote:
                  > > I'd recommend small seeded fava beans... I think they are called
                  > bell beans.
                  > > I grow them every year, and I think they are a wonderful, nitrogen
                  > > fixing winter cover crop.
                  > > Steve Solomon recommends them in "Gardening West of the Cascades" (a
                  > > wonderful book... only one suggestion that didn't work, in my
                  > experience.)
                  > >
                  > > Even though it is late in the year, they will make some growth this
                  > > fall and then go up to four or five feet in the spring. I grow them
                  > > in small areas (four feet by eight feet) and it is easy to
                  > > incorporate them in the soil. Since you have a much larger area, you
                  > > might want to cut them or pull them up at an earlier stage...
                  > >
                  > > I have them already in most of my beds that don't have winter greens,
                  > > but when I take out the tomatoes in a week or two, I will put fava
                  > > beans in that bed too. Because it is late in the season, I do like to
                  > > sprout the seeds first indoors (just the way you would sprout alfalfa
                  > > sprouts) and then sow them outdoors when they are just starting to
                  > sprout.
                  > >
                  > > I buy my seed from Down to Earth, and I think Territorial also
                  > > carries them. Also buy a package of the appropriate innoculant, it
                  > > will cost about $5.
                  > >
                  > > Because it is late in the season, if those places are out, then see
                  > > if you can find seed at one of the farmer's supply places, or online.
                  > >
                  > > Here in Eugene, they have never had any problems with winter cold....
                  > > if it gets colder where you are, then you should check the cold
                  > > hardiness of the seed before you buy... I think they are hardy down
                  > > to 10 degrees or so, but I don't remember exactly (don't have time to
                  > > look it up) and it varies by variety.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > At 08:25 AM 11/1/2008, Christine Robins wrote:
                  > > >Have any folks had experience planting cover-crops this late in the
                  > > >fall? We're having a 40' x 200' strip tilled today, where we plan to
                  > > >plant fruit and nut trees next year. It has not been planted for at
                  > > >least 50 years. We'll fill the gaps between the trees with
                  > > >permaculture-type plants, rather than common annual vegatables.
                  > > >
                  > > >It looks like annual ryegrass (not cereal rye) is the most cold-hardy
                  > > >possibility. We'd appreciate any suggestions for other alternatives or
                  > > >combinations of cover-crops.
                  > > >
                  > > >Other info: We live in Corvallis. Latest weather prediction is 10
                  > > >days of rainy weather.
                  > > >
                  > > >Thanks
                  > > >
                  > > >Christine Robins
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >------------------------------------
                  > > >
                  > > >Got an event to publicize? Add it to our publicly-viewable monthly
                  > > >calendar at: www.eugenepermacultureguild.orgYahoo! Groups Links
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > ------------------------------------
                  > >
                  > > Got an event to publicize? Add it to our publicly-viewable monthly
                  > calendar at: www.eugenepermacultureguild.orgYahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.