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Re: [epguild] GeoThermal?

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  • Gordon Sturrock
    To: epguild@yahoogroups.com Subject: Fwd: Re: [epguild] GeoThermal? Thank you Chris. I really appreciate hearing from you, and all the others from this group
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 1, 2011
      To: epguild@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Fwd: Re: [epguild] GeoThermal?

      Thank you Chris. I really appreciate hearing from you, and all the others from this group too. It's a priceless resource!
      I'm going to be gone all day today, going to court in Tacoma to be tried for my arrest in January. It's my second Federal arrest. Should be back late today.
      Here's a link with information about what we did if anyone is interested: http://olyblog.net/protest-trial-tomorrow
      Best wishes!
      Gordon



      To: epguild@yahoogroups.com
      From: Chris Roth <chris@...>
      Date: Tue, 31 May 2011 22:20:09 -0700
      Subject: Re: [epguild] GeoThermal?


      My parents have geothermal in their house in Oberlin, Ohio, and they like it. It relies on grid electricity and is controlled by an internal computer (is not user-serviceable), but it does use much less energy than regular electric heat, a gas furnace, etc. It not only warms in winter but cools in summer. I think they were the first residence in the town to have it, but now geothermal is catching on there. It seems like a good direction to me, especially compared to what it's replacing. It may make most sense in more severe climates (places with cold winters and hot summers) than it does in the Pacific Northwest--I'm not sure about that. Passive solar heating and cooling would obviously be the leading choice, wherever it's feasible.

      Gordon Sturrock wrote:
       

      What's the "lowdown" on GeoThermal, such as described in this vid:
      http://youtu.be/9fD2bMavK8Y which i previously posted?
      Seems to be a wise direction, even if only an incremental solution.
      Gordon
    • David Hoffman
      Is this GeoThermal where heat energy is generated by really hot volcanic bedrock, etc. causing hotsprings, etc. or is this in-ground / ground source heat
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2011
        Is this GeoThermal where heat energy is generated by really hot volcanic
        bedrock, etc. causing hotsprings, etc. or is this in-ground / ground source
        "heat pump" compared to heat pump in ambient air? One website mentions
        "International Ground Source Heat Pump Association".

        GeoThermal "originates from the original formation of the planet, from
        radioactive decay of minerals, from volcanic activity, and from solar
        energy absorbed at the surface."
        "historically been limited to areas near tectonic plate boundaries. Recent
        technological advances have dramatically expanded the range and size of
        viable resources, especially for applications such as home heating, opening
        a potential for widespread exploitation."

        GeoThermal websites talk of most any location and such as a "trench with
        the pipe going out at 5' or 6' deep and returning at 3' or 4' deep." In the
        upper U.S., that's considered depth of water pipes merely to prevent freezing.

        And this is not permanent. Like other heating / cooling equipment: "ten
        year warranty" and
        "Provides: System Repairs : We service all brands. 24 hour emergency
        service is available.
        Replacements: We can replace that worn out system with a new energy saving
        system at a fair price."

        For a "structure", an in-ground heat pump may be better than ambient air
        but with more equipment and harder to install. For sustainable, earth-berm
        with solar access uses little-to-no power.

        Mark?

        HAPPY HUMUS!

        On 5/31/2011 10:20 PM, Chris Roth wrote:
        > My parents have geothermal in their house in Oberlin, Ohio, and they like it. It
        > relies on grid electricity and is controlled by an internal computer (is not
        > user-serviceable), but it does use much less energy than regular electric heat,
        > a gas furnace, etc. It not only warms in winter but cools in summer. I think
        > they were the first residence in the town to have it, but now geothermal is
        > catching on there. It seems like a good direction to me, especially compared to
        > what it's replacing. It may make most sense in more severe climates (places with
        > cold winters and hot summers) than it does in the Pacific Northwest--I'm not
        > sure about that. Passive solar heating and cooling would obviously be the
        > leading choice, wherever it's feasible.
        >
        > Gordon Sturrock wrote:
        >
        >> What's the "lowdown" on GeoThermal, such as described in this vid:
        >> http://youtu.be/9fD2bMavK8Y which i previously posted?
        >> Seems to be a wise direction, even if only an incremental solution.
        >> Gordon
      • Chris Roth
        Hi David, My parents system is a ground-source heat pump; they have four 50-foot-deep (I think) wells in their front yard through which a heat-exchange liquid
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 1, 2011
          Hi David,

          My parents' system is a ground-source heat pump; they have four 50-foot-deep (I think) wells in their front yard through which a heat-exchange liquid is circulated to collect the ground temperature (which is then raised for use in heating by compressing it), or to dump extra heat from the house back into the ground. Unfortunately and fortunately, there are no hotsprings or volcanoes in Oberlin. And yes, it's high-tech.

          Chris

          David Hoffman wrote:
          Is this GeoThermal where heat energy is generated by really hot volcanic 
          bedrock, etc. causing hotsprings, etc. or is this in-ground / ground source 
          "heat pump" compared to heat pump in ambient air? One website mentions 
          "International Ground Source Heat Pump Association".
          
          GeoThermal "originates from the original formation of the planet, from 
          radioactive decay of minerals, from volcanic activity, and from solar 
          energy absorbed at the surface."
          "historically been limited to areas near tectonic plate boundaries. Recent 
          technological advances have dramatically expanded the range and size of 
          viable resources, especially for applications such as home heating, opening 
          a potential for widespread exploitation."
          
          GeoThermal websites talk of most any location and such as a "trench with 
          the pipe going out at 5' or 6' deep and returning at 3' or 4' deep." In the 
          upper U.S., that's considered depth of water pipes merely to prevent freezing.
          
          And this is not permanent. Like other heating / cooling equipment: "ten 
          year warranty" and
          "Provides:  System Repairs : We service all brands. 24 hour emergency 
          service is available.
          Replacements: We can replace that worn out system with a new energy saving 
          system at a fair price."
          
          For a "structure", an in-ground heat pump may be better than ambient air 
          but with more equipment and harder to install. For sustainable, earth-berm 
          with solar access uses little-to-no power.
          
          Mark?
          
          HAPPY HUMUS!
          
          On 5/31/2011 10:20 PM, Chris Roth wrote:
            
          My parents have geothermal in their house in Oberlin, Ohio, and they like it. It
          relies on grid electricity and is controlled by an internal computer (is not
          user-serviceable), but it does use much less energy than regular electric heat,
          a gas furnace, etc. It not only warms in winter but cools in summer. I think
          they were the first residence in the town to have it, but now geothermal is
          catching on there. It seems like a good direction to me, especially compared to
          what it's replacing. It may make most sense in more severe climates (places with
          cold winters and hot summers) than it does in the Pacific Northwest--I'm not
          sure about that. Passive solar heating and cooling would obviously be the
          leading choice, wherever it's feasible.
          
          Gordon Sturrock wrote:
          
              
           What's the "lowdown" on GeoThermal, such as described in this vid:
           http://youtu.be/9fD2bMavK8Y which i previously posted?
           Seems to be a wise direction, even if only an incremental solution.
           Gordon
                
          
          
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        • Mark Robinowitz
          Geothermal heat pumps are the gold standard for heating efficiency for homes. No connection to volcanic heat from deep in the Earth, which is very site
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 2, 2011
            Geothermal heat pumps are the "gold standard" for heating efficiency for homes. No connection to volcanic heat from deep in the Earth, which is very site specific. They are a bit spendy on the installation but then the heating and cooling costs are minimal for the life of the structure.

            George W. Bush put in a nice geothermal heat pump at his house in Crawford, Texas to minimize the cooling costs. I don't know if GWB put one in his new house in the north Dallas suburbs (where he really lives now, not Crawford).

            I don't think Albert Gore, Jr. put such a system at his house near Nashville, although he did add a nice photovoltaic solar electric system after conservatives harped on his hypocrisy after "Inconvenient Truth" was released.



            On Jun 1, 2011, at 3:54 PM Jun 1, Chris Roth wrote:

            > Hi David,
            >
            > My parents' system is a ground-source heat pump; they have four 50-foot-deep (I think) wells in their front yard through which a heat-exchange liquid is circulated to collect the ground temperature (which is then raised for use in heating by compressing it), or to dump extra heat from the house back into the ground. Unfortunately and fortunately, there are no hotsprings or volcanoes in Oberlin. And yes, it's high-tech.
            >
            > Chris
            >
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