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LIght Bulbs - news link, comparing Mercury to old incandescent bulbs functions

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  • micheal sunanda
    http://www.standeyo.com/NEWS/10_Sci_Tech/101130.incandescent.lightbulbs.html I tried Mercury lite in my tiny treehouse i lived in for 3+ years, it exploded
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2010
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      http://www.standeyo.com/NEWS/10_Sci_Tech/101130.incandescent.lightbulbs.html

      I tried Mercury lite in my tiny treehouse i lived in for 3+ years, it exploded inside there, poisoning me, mercury is VERY TOXIC, nerve damaging , like from mercuy teeth fillings admitted to reducing human fertlilty, plus many other toxins: X-rays, microwaves & dozens of toxic chemicals.  Do you have any experience with Mercury light, the link compares them, & i'm now using old incandescent bulbs in the mini greenhouse, good for light & some warming
      any comments or ???   micheal 
    • Pete Benson
      I have no experience with mercury lights, but even if they *don t* explode, they have been manufactured; therefore sooner or later the mercury will return to
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2010
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        I have no experience with mercury lights, but even if they *don't* explode, they have been manufactured; therefore sooner or later the mercury will return to our environment, probably through the usual route of landfill > seepage into groundwater > our wells and streams.
         
        Pete Benson
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: 1 December 2010 1:44 AM
        Subject: [epguild] LIght Bulbs - news link, comparing Mercury to old incandescent bulbs functions

         

        http://www.standeyo.com/NEWS/10_Sci_Tech/101130.incandescent.lightbulbs.html

        I tried Mercury lite in my tiny treehouse i lived in for 3+ years, it exploded inside there, poisoning me, mercury is VERY TOXIC, nerve damaging , like from mercuy teeth fillings admitted to reducing human fertlilty, plus many other toxins: X-rays, microwaves & dozens of toxic chemicals.  Do you have any experience with Mercury light, the link compares them, & i'm now using old incandescent bulbs in the mini greenhouse, good for light & some warming
        any comments or ???   micheal 

      • Cory Fulton
        Hi all,   The epa has studied the mercury content of comact fluorescent lights (cfl) vs the mercury content of a variety of power mixes that include coal,
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 2, 2010
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          Hi all,
           
          The epa has studied the mercury content of comact fluorescent lights (cfl) vs the mercury content of a variety of power mixes that include coal, i.e. how much mercury is released from burning the coal to power the additional electricity required for the incand over the light-equivalent cfl.
           
          Bottom line is: mercury emissions are reduced by using less electricity, regardless of the device using the electricity. As an example, I'm going to guess that more mercury reductions and energy savings could be gained by turning electric heat way down than would be achieved by changing every lightbulb in the house.
           
          They found about a 60% decrease in the total mercury released (as air emissions and/or landfill additions) for the cfl when compared to the incan with the same amount of use hours.
           
          here's a link to an epa mercury FAQ sheet
           
          Also, I've had the same experience with cfls not lasting as long as advertised. May have to change my habits on how frequently I switch them on and off.
           
          Peace,
          Cory

          --- On Wed, 12/1/10, Pete Benson <petebenson@...> wrote:

          From: Pete Benson <petebenson@...>
          Subject: Re: [epguild] LIght Bulbs - news link, comparing Mercury to old incandescent bulbs functions
          To: epguild@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 5:42 PM

           
          I have no experience with mercury lights, but even if they *don't* explode, they have been manufactured; therefore sooner or later the mercury will return to our environment, probably through the usual route of landfill > seepage into groundwater > our wells and streams.
           
          Pete Benson
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: 1 December 2010 1:44 AM
          Subject: [epguild] LIght Bulbs - news link, comparing Mercury to old incandescent bulbs functions

           
          http://www.standeyo.com/NEWS/10_Sci_Tech/101130.incandescent.lightbulbs.html

          I tried Mercury lite in my tiny treehouse i lived in for 3+ years, it exploded inside there, poisoning me, mercury is VERY TOXIC, nerve damaging , like from mercuy teeth fillings admitted to reducing human fertlilty, plus many other toxins: X-rays, microwaves & dozens of toxic chemicals.  Do you have any experience with Mercury light, the link compares them, & i'm now using old incandescent bulbs in the mini greenhouse, good for light & some warming
          any comments or ???   micheal 

        • David Hoffman
          Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights are getting more efficient and cheaper. New reflector designs are getting better at turning LED s narrow-angle emission to
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 2, 2010
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            Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights are getting more efficient and cheaper.
            New reflector designs are getting better at turning LED's narrow-angle
            emission to space-lighting.

            By-the-By: LED bulb replacements for Maglite brand flashlights including
            Mini-Mags. Greatly expands battery life. NOTE: some bulb adapters still
            allow adjusting focus, some don't. And other accessories.
            http://www.niteize.com/collections/flashlights\

            HAPPY HUMUS!

            AUDIT THE FEDERAL RESERVE !!!


            On 12/2/2010 10:35 AM, Cory Fulton wrote:
            > Hi all,
            >
            > The epa has studied the mercury content of comact fluorescent lights
            > (cfl) vs the mercury content of a variety of power mixes that include
            > coal, i.e. how much mercury is released from burning the coal to power
            > the additional electricity required for the incand over the
            > light-equivalent cfl.
            >
            > Bottom line is: mercury emissions are reduced by using less electricity,
            > regardless of the device using the electricity. As an example, I'm going
            > to guess that more mercury reductions and energy savings could be gained
            > by turning electric heat way down than would be achieved by changing
            > every lightbulb in the house.
            >
            > They found about a 60% decrease in the total mercury released (as air
            > emissions and/or landfill additions) for the cfl when compared to the
            > incan with the same amount of use hours.
            >
            > here's a link to an epa mercury FAQ sheet
            > http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/promotions/change_light/downloads/Fact_Sheet_Mercury.pdf
            >
            > Also, I've had the same experience with cfls not lasting as long as
            > advertised. May have to change my habits on how frequently I switch them
            > on and off.
            >
            > Peace, Cory
          • steveleppold
            The best way to prevent the release of mercury from lighting is to recycle lamps and not dispose of them in the solid waste stream. Recycling lamps captures
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 2, 2010
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              "The best way to prevent the release of mercury from lighting is to recycle lamps and not dispose of them in the solid waste stream. Recycling lamps captures the mercury, allowing it to be reused."

              from:
              http://www.lamprecycle.org/whyrecycle.shtml
              "Generally fluorescent lamps are four to five times more efficient than incandescent bulbs. Fluorescent lamps reduce the need for power plants to burn fossil fuels to generate electricity, thereby reducing emissions including mercury, carbon dioxide and other pollutants that contribute to climate change.
              These lamps also reduce solid waste, since they last longer than incandescent or halogen lamps and require less frequent replacement.
              However, energy-efficient lighting products such as fluorescent lamps, CFLs, and high intensity discharge (HID) lamps contain small amounts of mercury.
              The mercury is contained within the lamp and is not exposed to the environment unless the lamp is broken at the end of its life. The release of mercury is most likely to occur when the lamp is thrown in a garbage truck or a dumpster.
              While lamps are not a major source of mercury pollution, the improper disposal of large numbers of lamps does add to mercury in the environment. Burning hazardous wastes or incineration of disposed materials can also release mercury into the environment. The greatest source of man-made mercury emissions, at 40%, is from fossil-fuel burning power plants.
              The best way to prevent the release of mercury from lighting is to recycle lamps and not dispose of them in the solid waste stream. Recycling lamps captures the mercury, allowing it to be reused.
              The US Environmental Protection Agency has special regulations for mercury-containing lamps, which eliminates excessive paperwork, alleviates transport issues, and helps keep disposal costs low, easing the path for lamp recycling.
              A robust and growing business has developed to collect and recycle end of life mercury lamps from commercial buildings. Options for retail consumers are expanding rapidly as well. Many local governments now collect end-of-life lamps and some retailers such as Ikea and HomeDepot are also taking back lamps."

              --- In epguild@yahoogroups.com, "Pete Benson" <petebenson@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have no experience with mercury lights, but even if they *don't* explode, they have been manufactured; therefore sooner or later the mercury will return to our environment, probably through the usual route of landfill > seepage into groundwater > our wells and streams.
              >
              > Pete Benson
              >
            • Michael Wherley
              Most stores that sell fluorescents will take back spent ones for recycling. I take mine back to the lighting store at 6th and Garfield. Michael
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 2, 2010
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                Most stores that sell fluorescents will take back spent ones for
                recycling. I take mine back to the lighting store at 6th and Garfield.

                Michael

                On 12/2/10 6:33 PM, steveleppold wrote:
                > "The best way to prevent the release of mercury from lighting is to recycle lamps and not dispose of them in the solid waste stream. Recycling lamps captures the mercury, allowing it to be reused."
                >
                > from:
                > http://www.lamprecycle.org/whyrecycle.shtml
                > "Generally fluorescent lamps are four to five times more efficient than incandescent bulbs. Fluorescent lamps reduce the need for power plants to burn fossil fuels to generate electricity, thereby reducing emissions including mercury, carbon dioxide and other pollutants that contribute to climate change.
                > These lamps also reduce solid waste, since they last longer than incandescent or halogen lamps and require less frequent replacement.
                > However, energy-efficient lighting products such as fluorescent lamps, CFLs, and high intensity discharge (HID) lamps contain small amounts of mercury.
                > The mercury is contained within the lamp and is not exposed to the environment unless the lamp is broken at the end of its life. The release of mercury is most likely to occur when the lamp is thrown in a garbage truck or a dumpster.
                > While lamps are not a major source of mercury pollution, the improper disposal of large numbers of lamps does add to mercury in the environment. Burning hazardous wastes or incineration of disposed materials can also release mercury into the environment. The greatest source of man-made mercury emissions, at 40%, is from fossil-fuel burning power plants.
                > The best way to prevent the release of mercury from lighting is to recycle lamps and not dispose of them in the solid waste stream. Recycling lamps captures the mercury, allowing it to be reused.
                > The US Environmental Protection Agency has special regulations for mercury-containing lamps, which eliminates excessive paperwork, alleviates transport issues, and helps keep disposal costs low, easing the path for lamp recycling.
                > A robust and growing business has developed to collect and recycle end of life mercury lamps from commercial buildings. Options for retail consumers are expanding rapidly as well. Many local governments now collect end-of-life lamps and some retailers such as Ikea and HomeDepot are also taking back lamps."
                >
                > --- In epguild@yahoogroups.com, "Pete Benson"<petebenson@...> wrote:
                >> I have no experience with mercury lights, but even if they *don't* explode, they have been manufactured; therefore sooner or later the mercury will return to our environment, probably through the usual route of landfill> seepage into groundwater> our wells and streams.
                >>
                >> Pete Benson
                >>
              • Mark Robinowitz
                If there was environmental policy in name and not in public relations, taking back these bulbs would be mandatory, encouraged loudly and there would be a big
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 2, 2010
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                  If there was environmental policy in name and not in public relations, taking back these bulbs would be mandatory, encouraged loudly and there would be a big deposit on the bulbs to ensure the zombies would think about recycling them. If as much as ten percent of CFLs were "recycled" I'd be impressed. I've used CFLs for about two decades and I hope the light quality of LEDs continues to improve so they can be more useful as reading lights, they're extremely efficient and free of mercury.

                  We cannot even screen out cardboard boxes from the "waste" stream (visiting the trash pit at the Glenwood transfer station is an educational experience), so how can CFLs be reliably screened out when most people don't have a clue how they work or their ingredients?

                  In the early days of CFLs there were more models that had the bulb separate from the electronics, since the transformer in the bulb's base lasts much longer than the glass tube. It's hard to find those kind now. Some of the initial CFLs also had "small amounts" of radioactive material in them, it made it a challenge to figure out which ones had radwastes and which ones did not. A similar technological mistake was made with smoke detectors -- almost all smoke detectors have americium-241 in them, enough for several lethal doses if inhaled. Am241 is a decay product of Pu239. Photoelectronic smoke detectors do not have radioactive material but some hardware stores don't even sell them. It also reminds me of how rechargeable batteries are rarely promoted by stores that sell batteries even though they last hundreds (or thousands) of cycles and therefore are far cheaper for the user. The fact that convenience of already charged batteries wins out over having to recharge a battery that costs slightly more but will last for many cycles suggests our society is not going to be able to understand the energy crisis now that we're passing Peak Everything. I hope to be proved wrong.


                  On Dec 2, 2010, at 6:33 PM Dec 2, steveleppold wrote:

                  >
                  > "The best way to prevent the release of mercury from lighting is to recycle lamps and not dispose of them in the solid waste stream. Recycling lamps captures the mercury, allowing it to be reused."
                  >
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