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Poison Oak as Medicine

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  • David Hoffman
    Poison Oak as Medicine A friend at the Oregon Country Fair is part Native American. He said that he was told that Poison Oak was used topically for sprains and
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2005
      Poison Oak as Medicine

      A friend at the Oregon Country Fair is part Native American. He said that
      he was told that Poison Oak was used topically for sprains and bruises. It
      is sometimes used with Arnica. His source was Krystal Whitecrow of the
      Miami Nation (N.Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio Valley) and she is former
      Chief of the Free Cherokee Nation. He also said that, Native genes aside,
      it does not affect him because of his friendly attitude to it

      Searches for "poison oak" + medicine give results mostly for poison oak
      remedies. A search for Arnica found the following site and BINGO! There is
      probably more info out there.

      HAPPY HUMUS!
      >>>>>>>>

      Poison Oak
      http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/i/ivypoi17.html

      "Bear in mind "A Modern Herbal" was written with the conventional wisdom of
      the early 1900's. This should be taken into account as some of the
      information may now be considered inaccurate, or not in accordance with
      modern medicine."

      Botanical: Rhus Toxicodendron (LINN.)
      Family: N.O. Anacardiaceae
      ...
      ---Part Used Medicinally---The fresh leaves, from which a fluid extract is
      prepared.
      ...
      ---Medicinal Action and Uses---Irritant, rubefacient, stimulant, narcotic.

      R. Toxicodendron was introduced into England first in 1640, but not used as
      a medicine till 1798, when Du Fressoy, a physician at Valenciennes, had
      brought to his notice a young man, who had been cured of a herpetic
      eruption on his wrist of six years' standing on being accidentally poisoned
      by this plant. He thereupon commenced the use of the plant in the treatment
      of obstinate herpetic eruptions and in palsy, many cases yielding well to
      the drug. Since then it has rapidly gained a place in general practice,
      meeting with some success in the treatment of paralysis, acute rheumatism
      and articular stiffness, and in various forms of chronic and obstinate
      eruptive diseases.

      It is not official in the British Pharmacopoeia, but was formerly official
      in the United States Pharmacopceia. It is in extensive use by
      homoeopathists for rheumatism, ringworm and other skin disorders, and is
      considered by them one of the most useful remedies in a great majority of
      cases of Nettlerash, especially if caused by some natural predisposition of
      constitution, in which the eruption is due to the use of some particular food.

      The fluid extract, prepared from the fresh leaves, is mostly given in the
      form of a tincture, in doses of 5 to 30 drops. In small doses it is an
      excellent sedative to the nervous system, but must be given with care, as
      internally it may cause gastric intestinal irritation, drowsiness, stupor
      and delirium.

      It has been recommended in cases of incontinence of urine. For this, the
      bark of the root of R. aromatica is also employed very successfully, an
      infusion of 1 OZ. to a pint of boiling water being taken in wineglassful
      doses.

      The fluid extract of R. Toxicodendron can be used as a vesicant or blister
      producer, like cantharides, mezeron, and oil of Mustard.

      The best preparation is a concentrated alcoholic tincture made from the
      green plant in the strength of 1 in 4. The dose of 25 per cent tincture is
      given in 1 to 5 drops three times a day. A solid extract is not used owing
      to the extreme volatility of the active principles of the crude drug.

      Its milky juice is also used as an indelible ink for marking linen, and as
      an ingredient of liquid dressings or varnishes for finishing boots or
      shoes, though R. venenata is more extensively used for the latter purpose.

      © Copyright Protected 1995-2005 Botanical.com
    • Karen Stingle
      Rhus tox is a homeopathic that is used, besides as a poison oak remedy, for aches and pains. Karen S
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 3, 2005
        Rhus tox is a homeopathic that is used, besides as a poison oak remedy,
        for aches and pains.

        Karen S

        >
        > Poison Oak as Medicine
        >
        > A friend at the Oregon Country Fair is part Native American. He said that
        > he was told that Poison Oak was used topically for sprains and bruises. It
        > is sometimes used with Arnica. His source was Krystal Whitecrow of the
        > Miami Nation (N.Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio Valley) and she is
        > former
        > Chief of the Free Cherokee Nation. He also said that, Native genes aside,
        > it does not affect him because of his friendly attitude to it
        >
        > Searches for "poison oak" + medicine give results mostly for poison oak
        > remedies. A search for Arnica found the following site and BINGO! There is
        > probably more info out there.
        >
        > HAPPY HUMUS!
        > >>>>>>>>
        >
        > Poison Oak
        > http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/i/ivypoi17.html
        >
        > "Bear in mind "A Modern Herbal" was written with the conventional wisdom
        > of
        > the early 1900's. This should be taken into account as some of the
        > information may now be considered inaccurate, or not in accordance with
        > modern medicine."
        >
        > Botanical: Rhus Toxicodendron (LINN.)
        > Family: N.O. Anacardiaceae
        > ...
        > ---Part Used Medicinally---The fresh leaves, from which a fluid extract is
        > prepared.
        > ...
        > ---Medicinal Action and Uses---Irritant, rubefacient, stimulant, narcotic.
        >
        > R. Toxicodendron was introduced into England first in 1640, but not used
        > as
        > a medicine till 1798, when Du Fressoy, a physician at Valenciennes, had
        > brought to his notice a young man, who had been cured of a herpetic
        > eruption on his wrist of six years' standing on being accidentally
        > poisoned
        > by this plant. He thereupon commenced the use of the plant in the
        > treatment
        > of obstinate herpetic eruptions and in palsy, many cases yielding well to
        > the drug. Since then it has rapidly gained a place in general practice,
        > meeting with some success in the treatment of paralysis, acute rheumatism
        > and articular stiffness, and in various forms of chronic and obstinate
        > eruptive diseases.
        >
        > It is not official in the British Pharmacopoeia, but was formerly official
        > in the United States Pharmacopceia. It is in extensive use by
        > homoeopathists for rheumatism, ringworm and other skin disorders, and is
        > considered by them one of the most useful remedies in a great majority of
        > cases of Nettlerash, especially if caused by some natural predisposition
        > of
        > constitution, in which the eruption is due to the use of some particular
        > food.
        >
        > The fluid extract, prepared from the fresh leaves, is mostly given in the
        > form of a tincture, in doses of 5 to 30 drops. In small doses it is an
        > excellent sedative to the nervous system, but must be given with care, as
        > internally it may cause gastric intestinal irritation, drowsiness, stupor
        > and delirium.
        >
        > It has been recommended in cases of incontinence of urine. For this, the
        > bark of the root of R. aromatica is also employed very successfully, an
        > infusion of 1 OZ. to a pint of boiling water being taken in wineglassful
        > doses.
        >
        > The fluid extract of R. Toxicodendron can be used as a vesicant or blister
        > producer, like cantharides, mezeron, and oil of Mustard.
        >
        > The best preparation is a concentrated alcoholic tincture made from the
        > green plant in the strength of 1 in 4. The dose of 25 per cent tincture is
        > given in 1 to 5 drops three times a day. A solid extract is not used owing
        > to the extreme volatility of the active principles of the crude drug.
        >
        > Its milky juice is also used as an indelible ink for marking linen, and as
        > an ingredient of liquid dressings or varnishes for finishing boots or
        > shoes, though R. venenata is more extensively used for the latter purpose.
        >
        > © Copyright Protected 1995-2005 Botanical.com
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