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Case Study : The Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters ' Dynamic Facade --- Series of Amazing Construction, j ust for educational purposes

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  • Asjid
    (Have a look when you have free time) Series of Amazing Construction, just for educational purposes Desert-smart towers carry their own sunscreen Abu Dhabi
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 21, 2012
    • 0 Attachment

      (Have a look when you have free time)

       

      Series of Amazing Construction, just for educational purposes

      Desert-smart towers carry their own sunscreen

      Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters Building

      Case Study : The Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters’ Dynamic Facade

      http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-1.jpg

      Figure 1: Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters

      Parametric modelling and BIM processes supported the design, coordination and construction of the Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters (ICHQ), still under construction in the UAE. This case study focuses on critical challenges faced in the design, construction and future operation of the dynamic “Mashrabiya” façade. It demonstrates how parametric modelling can be used to tune the complexities of an optimal, energy-efficient design so that it also takes into account the constraints and imitations of fabrication.  This multi-dimensional, non-linear approach, enabled by parametric modelling, informs and enhances the design process resulting in more compelling and energy-efficient links between the built and natural environment.

       The Headquarters for the Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ICHQ) is a 147m high twin-tower development located in Abu Dhabi, UAE. One tower will be occupied by Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC), and the other by Al Hilal Bank. In an innovative and captivating gesture to moderate the impact of the severe climate, the architects (AEDAS) conceived a kinetic facade composed of elements that fold like origami in response to external changes in light and wind. The modules—called “Mashrabiya” by the design team in a nod to Islamic culture—make a responsive shading system that variably filters the light and heat entering the building at all times during the day. The facade even has the “intelligence” to react to unusual weather conditions.  If the weather goes beyond the norm, the facade will respond by deviating from its preset programme to offset the impact of the unusual conditions outside.  The engineers estimate that this kinetic and responsive facade, which is controlled automatically by a system that processes information from sensors measuring light and wind-speed, will reduce the building’s electricity consumption and carbon emissions by 20%.

      Quick Facts ICHQ Building

      • Project Name: Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters
      • Type of Project: Commercial Offices
      • 25 storeys + 2 Basement levels, Ground, Podium, Mezzanine and Crown-Levels
      • 147 m high
      • Size: 75000 sqm total built-up area
      • Owner: AD Investment Council
      • Design Architect: Aedas
      • Main Contractor: Al-Futtaim Carillion
      • Parametric and Building-Information Modeling (BIM): Gehry Technologies

      http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-2-225x300.jpg

      Figure 2: ADIC towers under construction

      Designing Parametric Origami: the unfolding of the “Mashrabiya”

      The Mashrabiya is a modular, dynamic, solar shading system comprising 1049 modules per tower that individually open and close in response to the movement of the sun throughout the course of a day. The opening mechanism, a linear screw-jack actuator and electric motor, in the center of each module that causes the triangular facets of the Mashrabiya to fold into the center, is automatically controlled by a Building Management System (BMS) that computes the state of each module in response to data sent by light sensors and anemometers—sensors for measuring wind speed. Instead of a binary “on-off” condition, each module in the facade varies smoothly between the open and closed states, allowing the facade to obtain an optimal balance between outside conditions and interior requirements throughout the building’s floor plan.

       The Mashrabiya effectively forms a second skin around the building that reduces solar gain and enhances energy efficiency. It regulates the sunlight and glare entering the buildings, improving comfort conditions inside, and avoiding the dark glazing—common in Middle Eastern buildings—that greatly reduces interior sunlight regardless of the light conditions outside. Moreover, given the great deal of energy that goes into thermal control, the facade is expected to significantly reduce electricity consumption and carbon emissions of the building—by around 20%—by smartly controlling the solar gain.

      http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-31-300x219.jpg

      Figure 3: Parametric Mashrabiya Model

      The design of the Mashrabiya facade’s physical structure—and behavior—was shaped by parametric technologies and processes. During the competition stage the architects wrote algorithms to describe the geometry of the Mashrabiya facade within traditional CAD systems. Immediately after, during the development stages, the definition of the mechanical and kinematic details of the modules demanded a more robust approach. Parametric modeling environments were key to develop the proof of concept critical to advance the project. An important aspect of this stage was to parametrically capture the movement of the module from the open to the closed states (See Figure 3). The parametric modeling team iterated over the module’s design with architecture and engineering teams until reaching an optimal solution.

      http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-4-300x152.jpg

      Figure 4

      At the module level the team of BIM consultants developed detailed parametric models to account for the unique motion of the components. At the facade level the by-product of the parametric model allowed studies to be conducted to test the lighting performance, energy performance, and the facade’s open vs. closed optimization. These studies fed back to the module, helping designers realize how even very small changes in the module—perhaps of only a few millimeters—affected the overall energy performance of the facade. Moreover, the BIM consultants developed computational methods of surface evaluation that helped designers optimize the size and shape of the glazing elements to maximize flatness and rectangularity of glass—a crucial budget factor.

       http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-5-300x166.jpg

      Figure 5: ‘intelligent connection’ to resolve non-repetitive details

      Script-based parametric design

       The shape of the ICHQ towers is deceivingly simple. Rather than a perfect circumference, the tower’s floor plan follows a series of arches varying subtly from floor to floor. As a result, the connections between the casings of the hexagonal honeycomb steel structure members that support the facade are different at each point along the perimeter of the building. In order to avoid clashes between the casings—and between the casings and each floor’s ceilings—and produce accurate descriptions for the fabricators, the team of BIM consultants developed intelligent connections that automatically measure the angle at the joint and check for potential clashes, rotating and trimming its pieces accordingly (See Figure 5). By analyzing the ratio of rotated elements throughout the facade in different scenarios, and the global amount of rotation, the team of BIM consultants was able to fine-tune the behavior of the intelligent connection to simplify both fabrication and assembly (See Figure 6). Similarly, the team developed intelligent connections between the interior facades and the radial partition walls. The connections measured the angle between the facade and the partition walls and adjusted automatically to their particular condition. When these “smart” models were placed in its specific location in the facade, both the structure and the partition connections were updated and the extraction of data to support shop-drawings was automated: accelerating the flow of  information to the fabricator (See Figure 7).

      http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-6-300x198.jpg

      Figure 6: Measuring performance in terms of required rotation.

      http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-7-300x268.jpg

      Figure 7: Automatically generated unfold fabrication drawings for column casings

      http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-8-300x217.jpg

      Figure 8: Visual Mockup and testing the Mashrabiya operation

       

      http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Abu+Dhabi+Investment+Council+Headquarters+construction+pictures&view=detail&id=98623CDB9E12CD83E0A339A66756615144BAA0C0&first=61&FORM=IDFRIR

       

    • Harish Desai
      kind attn. friends, i am a degree civil engineer with 15 years of experience and a diploma in construction contracts management from nicmar sode. i wish to
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 22, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        kind attn. friends,

        i am a degree civil engineer with 15 years of experience and a diploma in construction contracts management from nicmar sode.

        i wish to find a job in my field.

        please go through my profile on www.linkedin.com website.

        further please get in touch with me on 09867150876 for discussions.

        alternatively email me on the above email id.

         

        thanks and regards,

         

        HARISH DESAI
        CIVIL ENGINEER CUM CONTENT WRITER
        hary.desai@...






        --- On Sun, 21/10/12, Asjid <asjid@...> wrote:

        From: Asjid <asjid@...>
        Subject: [engineeringcivil] Case Study : The Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters' Dynamic Facade --- Series of Amazing Construction, just for educational purposes
        To: engineeringcivil@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, 21 October, 2012, 3:45 PM

         

        (Have a look when you have free time)

         

        Series of Amazing Construction, just for educational purposes

        Desert-smart towers carry their own sunscreen

        Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters Building

        Case Study : The Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters’ Dynamic Facade

        http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-1.jpg

        Figure 1: Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters

        Parametric modelling and BIM processes supported the design, coordination and construction of the Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters (ICHQ), still under construction in the UAE. This case study focuses on critical challenges faced in the design, construction and future operation of the dynamic “Mashrabiya” façade. It demonstrates how parametric modelling can be used to tune the complexities of an optimal, energy-efficient design so that it also takes into account the constraints and imitations of fabrication.  This multi-dimensional, non-linear approach, enabled by parametric modelling, informs and enhances the design process resulting in more compelling and energy-efficient links between the built and natural environment.

         The Headquarters for the Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ICHQ) is a 147m high twin-tower development located in Abu Dhabi, UAE. One tower will be occupied by Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC), and the other by Al Hilal Bank. In an innovative and captivating gesture to moderate the impact of the severe climate, the architects (AEDAS) conceived a kinetic facade composed of elements that fold like origami in response to external changes in light and wind. The modules—called “Mashrabiya” by the design team in a nod to Islamic culture—make a responsive shading system that variably filters the light and heat entering the building at all times during the day. The facade even has the “intelligence” to react to unusual weather conditions.  If the weather goes beyond the norm, the facade will respond by deviating from its preset programme to offset the impact of the unusual conditions outside.  The engineers estimate that this kinetic and responsive facade, which is controlled automatically by a system that processes information from sensors measuring light and wind-speed, will reduce the building’s electricity consumption and carbon emissions by 20%.

        Quick Facts ICHQ Building

        • Project Name: Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters
        • Type of Project: Commercial Offices
        • 25 storeys + 2 Basement levels, Ground, Podium, Mezzanine and Crown-Levels
        • 147 m high
        • Size: 75000 sqm total built-up area
        • Owner: AD Investment Council
        • Design Architect: Aedas
        • Main Contractor: Al-Futtaim Carillion
        • Parametric and Building-Information Modeling (BIM): Gehry Technologies

        http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-2-225x300.jpg

        Figure 2: ADIC towers under construction

        Designing Parametric Origami: the unfolding of the “Mashrabiya”

        The Mashrabiya is a modular, dynamic, solar shading system comprising 1049 modules per tower that individually open and close in response to the movement of the sun throughout the course of a day. The opening mechanism, a linear screw-jack actuator and electric motor, in the center of each module that causes the triangular facets of the Mashrabiya to fold into the center, is automatically controlled by a Building Management System (BMS) that computes the state of each module in response to data sent by light sensors and anemometers—sensors for measuring wind speed. Instead of a binary “on-off” condition, each module in the facade varies smoothly between the open and closed states, allowing the facade to obtain an optimal balance between outside conditions and interior requirements throughout the building’s floor plan.

         The Mashrabiya effectively forms a second skin around the building that reduces solar gain and enhances energy efficiency. It regulates the sunlight and glare entering the buildings, improving comfort conditions inside, and avoiding the dark glazing—common in Middle Eastern buildings—that greatly reduces interior sunlight regardless of the light conditions outside. Moreover, given the great deal of energy that goes into thermal control, the facade is expected to significantly reduce electricity consumption and carbon emissions of the building—by around 20%—by smartly controlling the solar gain.

        http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-31-300x219.jpg

        Figure 3: Parametric Mashrabiya Model

        The design of the Mashrabiya facade’s physical structure—and behavior—was shaped by parametric technologies and processes. During the competition stage the architects wrote algorithms to describe the geometry of the Mashrabiya facade within traditional CAD systems. Immediately after, during the development stages, the definition of the mechanical and kinematic details of the modules demanded a more robust approach. Parametric modeling environments were key to develop the proof of concept critical to advance the project. An important aspect of this stage was to parametrically capture the movement of the module from the open to the closed states (See Figure 3). The parametric modeling team iterated over the module’s design with architecture and engineering teams until reaching an optimal solution.

        http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-4-300x152.jpg

        Figure 4

        At the module level the team of BIM consultants developed detailed parametric models to account for the unique motion of the components. At the facade level the by-product of the parametric model allowed studies to be conducted to test the lighting performance, energy performance, and the facade’s open vs. closed optimization. These studies fed back to the module, helping designers realize how even very small changes in the module—perhaps of only a few millimeters—affected the overall energy performance of the facade. Moreover, the BIM consultants developed computational methods of surface evaluation that helped designers optimize the size and shape of the glazing elements to maximize flatness and rectangularity of glass—a crucial budget factor.

         http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-5-300x166.jpg

        Figure 5: ‘intelligent connection’ to resolve non-repetitive details

        Script-based parametric design

         The shape of the ICHQ towers is deceivingly simple. Rather than a perfect circumference, the tower’s floor plan follows a series of arches varying subtly from floor to floor. As a result, the connections between the casings of the hexagonal honeycomb steel structure members that support the facade are different at each point along the perimeter of the building. In order to avoid clashes between the casings—and between the casings and each floor’s ceilings—and produce accurate descriptions for the fabricators, the team of BIM consultants developed intelligent connections that automatically measure the angle at the joint and check for potential clashes, rotating and trimming its pieces accordingly (See Figure 5). By analyzing the ratio of rotated elements throughout the facade in different scenarios, and the global amount of rotation, the team of BIM consultants was able to fine-tune the behavior of the intelligent connection to simplify both fabrication and assembly (See Figure 6). Similarly, the team developed intelligent connections between the interior facades and the radial partition walls. The connections measured the angle between the facade and the partition walls and adjusted automatically to their particular condition. When these “smart” models were placed in its specific location in the facade, both the structure and the partition connections were updated and the extraction of data to support shop-drawings was automated: accelerating the flow of  information to the fabricator (See Figure 7).

        http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-6-300x198.jpg

        Figure 6: Measuring performance in terms of required rotation.

        http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-7-300x268.jpg

        Figure 7: Automatically generated unfold fabrication drawings for column casings

        http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-8-300x217.jpg

        Figure 8: Visual Mockup and testing the Mashrabiya operation

         

        http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Abu+Dhabi+Investment+Council+Headquarters+construction+pictures&view=detail&id=98623CDB9E12CD83E0A339A66756615144BAA0C0&first=61&FORM=IDFRIR

         

      • JIJO M JAMES
        dear all, very gud information. ... -- With Thanks & Regards, JIJO M JAMES [B.E / CIVIL] E Mail : jmjmiracleministry@gmail.com Ph: +91 9633750225 (K) dear all,
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 22, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          dear all,
          very gud information.


          On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 10:27 AM, Harish Desai <hary.desai@...> wrote:
          kind attn. friends,

          i am a degree civil engineer with 15 years of experience and a diploma in construction contracts management from nicmar sode.

          i wish to find a job in my field.

          please go through my profile on www.linkedin.com website.

          further please get in touch with me on 09867150876 for discussions.

          alternatively email me on the above email id.

           

          thanks and regards,

           

          HARISH DESAI
          CIVIL ENGINEER CUM CONTENT WRITER
          hary.desai@...






          --- On Sun, 21/10/12, Asjid <asjid@...> wrote:

          From: Asjid <asjid@...>
          Subject: [engineeringcivil] Case Study : The Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters' Dynamic Facade --- Series of Amazing Construction, just for educational purposes
          To: engineeringcivil@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, 21 October, 2012, 3:45 PM

           

          (Have a look when you have free time)

           

          Series of Amazing Construction, just for educational purposes

          Desert-smart towers carry their own sunscreen

          Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters Building

          Case Study : The Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters’ Dynamic Facade

          http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-1.jpg

          Figure 1: Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters

          Parametric modelling and BIM processes supported the design, coordination and construction of the Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters (ICHQ), still under construction in the UAE. This case study focuses on critical challenges faced in the design, construction and future operation of the dynamic “Mashrabiya” façade. It demonstrates how parametric modelling can be used to tune the complexities of an optimal, energy-efficient design so that it also takes into account the constraints and imitations of fabrication.  This multi-dimensional, non-linear approach, enabled by parametric modelling, informs and enhances the design process resulting in more compelling and energy-efficient links between the built and natural environment.

           The Headquarters for the Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ICHQ) is a 147m high twin-tower development located in Abu Dhabi, UAE. One tower will be occupied by Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC), and the other by Al Hilal Bank. In an innovative and captivating gesture to moderate the impact of the severe climate, the architects (AEDAS) conceived a kinetic facade composed of elements that fold like origami in response to external changes in light and wind. The modules—called “Mashrabiya” by the design team in a nod to Islamic culture—make a responsive shading system that variably filters the light and heat entering the building at all times during the day. The facade even has the “intelligence” to react to unusual weather conditions.  If the weather goes beyond the norm, the facade will respond by deviating from its preset programme to offset the impact of the unusual conditions outside.  The engineers estimate that this kinetic and responsive facade, which is controlled automatically by a system that processes information from sensors measuring light and wind-speed, will reduce the building’s electricity consumption and carbon emissions by 20%.

          Quick Facts ICHQ Building

          • Project Name: Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters
          • Type of Project: Commercial Offices
          • 25 storeys + 2 Basement levels, Ground, Podium, Mezzanine and Crown-Levels
          • 147 m high
          • Size: 75000 sqm total built-up area
          • Owner: AD Investment Council
          • Design Architect: Aedas
          • Main Contractor: Al-Futtaim Carillion
          • Parametric and Building-Information Modeling (BIM): Gehry Technologies

          http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-2-225x300.jpg

          Figure 2: ADIC towers under construction

          Designing Parametric Origami: the unfolding of the “Mashrabiya”

          The Mashrabiya is a modular, dynamic, solar shading system comprising 1049 modules per tower that individually open and close in response to the movement of the sun throughout the course of a day. The opening mechanism, a linear screw-jack actuator and electric motor, in the center of each module that causes the triangular facets of the Mashrabiya to fold into the center, is automatically controlled by a Building Management System (BMS) that computes the state of each module in response to data sent by light sensors and anemometers—sensors for measuring wind speed. Instead of a binary “on-off” condition, each module in the facade varies smoothly between the open and closed states, allowing the facade to obtain an optimal balance between outside conditions and interior requirements throughout the building’s floor plan.

           The Mashrabiya effectively forms a second skin around the building that reduces solar gain and enhances energy efficiency. It regulates the sunlight and glare entering the buildings, improving comfort conditions inside, and avoiding the dark glazing—common in Middle Eastern buildings—that greatly reduces interior sunlight regardless of the light conditions outside. Moreover, given the great deal of energy that goes into thermal control, the facade is expected to significantly reduce electricity consumption and carbon emissions of the building—by around 20%—by smartly controlling the solar gain.

          http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-31-300x219.jpg

          Figure 3: Parametric Mashrabiya Model

          The design of the Mashrabiya facade’s physical structure—and behavior—was shaped by parametric technologies and processes. During the competition stage the architects wrote algorithms to describe the geometry of the Mashrabiya facade within traditional CAD systems. Immediately after, during the development stages, the definition of the mechanical and kinematic details of the modules demanded a more robust approach. Parametric modeling environments were key to develop the proof of concept critical to advance the project. An important aspect of this stage was to parametrically capture the movement of the module from the open to the closed states (See Figure 3). The parametric modeling team iterated over the module’s design with architecture and engineering teams until reaching an optimal solution.

          http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-4-300x152.jpg

          Figure 4

          At the module level the team of BIM consultants developed detailed parametric models to account for the unique motion of the components. At the facade level the by-product of the parametric model allowed studies to be conducted to test the lighting performance, energy performance, and the facade’s open vs. closed optimization. These studies fed back to the module, helping designers realize how even very small changes in the module—perhaps of only a few millimeters—affected the overall energy performance of the facade. Moreover, the BIM consultants developed computational methods of surface evaluation that helped designers optimize the size and shape of the glazing elements to maximize flatness and rectangularity of glass—a crucial budget factor.

           http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-5-300x166.jpg

          Figure 5: ‘intelligent connection’ to resolve non-repetitive details

          Script-based parametric design

           The shape of the ICHQ towers is deceivingly simple. Rather than a perfect circumference, the tower’s floor plan follows a series of arches varying subtly from floor to floor. As a result, the connections between the casings of the hexagonal honeycomb steel structure members that support the facade are different at each point along the perimeter of the building. In order to avoid clashes between the casings—and between the casings and each floor’s ceilings—and produce accurate descriptions for the fabricators, the team of BIM consultants developed intelligent connections that automatically measure the angle at the joint and check for potential clashes, rotating and trimming its pieces accordingly (See Figure 5). By analyzing the ratio of rotated elements throughout the facade in different scenarios, and the global amount of rotation, the team of BIM consultants was able to fine-tune the behavior of the intelligent connection to simplify both fabrication and assembly (See Figure 6). Similarly, the team developed intelligent connections between the interior facades and the radial partition walls. The connections measured the angle between the facade and the partition walls and adjusted automatically to their particular condition. When these “smart” models were placed in its specific location in the facade, both the structure and the partition connections were updated and the extraction of data to support shop-drawings was automated: accelerating the flow of  information to the fabricator (See Figure 7).

          http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-6-300x198.jpg

          Figure 6: Measuring performance in terms of required rotation.

          http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-7-300x268.jpg

          Figure 7: Automatically generated unfold fabrication drawings for column casings

          http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-8-300x217.jpg

          Figure 8: Visual Mockup and testing the Mashrabiya operation

           

          http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Abu+Dhabi+Investment+Council+Headquarters+construction+pictures&view=detail&id=98623CDB9E12CD83E0A339A66756615144BAA0C0&first=61&FORM=IDFRIR

           




          --
          With Thanks & Regards,


           JIJO M JAMES
             [B.E / CIVIL]

          E Mail : jmjmiracleministry@...

          Ph: +91 9633750225 (K)








        • ramana pandillapalli
          Dear Harish are you ready to work any where in india   regards venkata ramana P Sr.AGM ( P ) ... From: Harish Desai Subject:
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 22, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Dear Harish are you ready to work any where in india
             
            regards
            venkata ramana P
            Sr.AGM ( P )

            --- On Fri, 11/23/12, Harish Desai <hary.desai@...> wrote:

            From: Harish Desai <hary.desai@...>
            Subject: [engineeringcivil] Re: looking for a job in civil engineering field
            To: engineeringcivil@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, November 23, 2012, 10:27 AM

            http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Abu+Dhabi+Investment+Council+Headquarters+construction+pictures&view=detail&id=98623CDB9E12CD83E0A339A66756615144BAA0C0&first=61&FORM=IDFRIR

             

            kind attn. friends,

            i am a degree civil engineer with 15 years of experience and a diploma in construction contracts management from nicmar sode.

            i wish to find a job in my field.

            please go through my profile on www.linkedin.com website.

            further please get in touch with me on 09867150876 for discussions.

            alternatively email me on the above email id.

             
            thanks and regards,
             
            HARISH DESAI
            CIVIL ENGINEER CUM CONTENT WRITER
            hary.desai@...






            --- On Sun, 21/10/12, Asjid <asjid@...> wrote:

            From: Asjid <asjid@...>
            Subject: [engineeringcivil] Case Study : The Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters' Dynamic Facade --- Series of Amazing Construction, just for educational purposes
            To: engineeringcivil@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, 21 October, 2012, 3:45 PM

             

            (Have a look when you have free time)

             

            Series of Amazing Construction, just for educational purposes

            Desert-smart towers carry their own sunscreen

            Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters Building

            Case Study : The Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters’ Dynamic Facade

            http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-1.jpg
            Figure 1: Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters
            Parametric modelling and BIM processes supported the design, coordination and construction of the Abu Dhabi Investment Council Headquarters (ICHQ), still under construction in the UAE. This case study focuses on critical challenges faced in the design, construction and future operation of the dynamic “Mashrabiya” façade. It demonstrates how parametric modelling can be used to tune the complexities of an optimal, energy-efficient design so that it also takes into account the constraints and imitations of fabrication.  This multi-dimensional, non-linear approach, enabled by parametric modelling, informs and enhances the design process resulting in more compelling and energy-efficient links between the built and natural environment.
             The Headquarters for the Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ICHQ) is a 147m high twin-tower development located in Abu Dhabi, UAE. One tower will be occupied by Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC), and the other by Al Hilal Bank. In an innovative and captivating gesture to moderate the impact of the severe climate, the architects (AEDAS) conceived a kinetic facade composed of elements that fold like origami in response to external changes in light and wind. The modules—called “Mashrabiya” by the design team in a nod to Islamic culture—make a responsive shading system that variably filters the light and heat entering the building at all times during the day. The facade even has the “intelligence” to react to unusual weather conditions.  If the weather goes beyond the norm, the facade will respond by deviating from its preset programme to offset the impact of the unusual conditions outside.  The engineers estimate that this kinetic and responsive facade, which is controlled automatically by a system that processes information from sensors measuring light and wind-speed, will reduce the building’s electricity consumption and carbon emissions by 20%.
            Quick Facts ICHQ Building
            • Project Name: Abu Dhabi Investment Council (ADIC) Headquarters
            • Type of Project: Commercial Offices
            • 25 storeys + 2 Basement levels, Ground, Podium, Mezzanine and Crown-Levels
            • 147 m high
            • Size: 75000 sqm total built-up area
            • Owner: AD Investment Council
            • Design Architect: Aedas
            • Main Contractor: Al-Futtaim Carillion
            • Parametric and Building-Information Modeling (BIM): Gehry Technologies
            http://www.bimjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/article-3-figure-2-225x300.jpg
            Figure 2: ADIC towers under construction
            Designing Parametric Origami: the unfolding of the “Mashrabiya”
            The Mashrabiya is a modular, dynamic, solar shading system comprising 1049 modules per tower that individually open and close in response to the movement of the sun throughout the course of a day. The opening mechanism, a linear screw-jack actuator and electric motor, in the center of each module that causes the triangular facets of the Mashrabiya to fold into the center, is automatically controlled by a Building Management System (BMS) that computes the state of each module in response to data sent by light sensors and anemometers—sensors for measuring wind speed. Instead of a binary “on-off” condition, each module in the facade varies smoothly between the open and closed states, allowing the facade to obtain an optimal balance between outside conditions and interior requirements throughout the building’s floor plan.
             The Mashrabiya effectively forms a second skin around the building that reduces solar gain and enhances energy efficiency. It regulates the sunlight and glare entering the buildings, improving comfort conditions inside, and avoiding the dark glazing—common in Middle Eastern buildings—that greatly reduces interior sunlight regardless of the light conditions outside. Moreover, given the great deal of energy that goes into thermal control, the facade is expected to significantly reduce electricity consumption and carbon emissions of the building—by around 20%—by smartly controlling the solar gain.
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            Figure 3: Parametric Mashrabiya Model
            The design of the Mashrabiya facade’s physical structure—and behavior—was shaped by parametric technologies and processes. During the competition stage the architects wrote algorithms to describe the geometry of the Mashrabiya facade within traditional CAD systems. Immediately after, during the development stages, the definition of the mechanical and kinematic details of the modules demanded a more robust approach. Parametric modeling environments were key to develop the proof of concept critical to advance the project. An important aspect of this stage was to parametrically capture the movement of the module from the open to the closed states (See Figure 3). The parametric modeling team iterated over the module’s design with architecture and engineering teams until reaching an optimal solution.
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            Figure 4
            At the module level the team of BIM consultants developed detailed parametric models to account for the unique motion of the components. At the facade level the by-product of the parametric model allowed studies to be conducted to test the lighting performance, energy performance, and the facade’s open vs. closed optimization. These studies fed back to the module, helping designers realize how even very small changes in the module—perhaps of only a few millimeters—affected the overall energy performance of the facade. Moreover, the BIM consultants developed computational methods of surface evaluation that helped designers optimize the size and shape of the glazing elements to maximize flatness and rectangularity of glass—a crucial budget factor.
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            Figure 5: ‘intelligent connection’ to resolve non-repetitive details
            Script-based parametric design
             The shape of the ICHQ towers is deceivingly simple. Rather than a perfect circumference, the tower’s floor plan follows a series of arches varying subtly from floor to floor. As a result, the connections between the casings of the hexagonal honeycomb steel structure members that support the facade are different at each point along the perimeter of the building. In order to avoid clashes between the casings—and between the casings and each floor’s ceilings—and produce accurate descriptions for the fabricators, the team of BIM consultants developed intelligent connections that automatically measure the angle at the joint and check for potential clashes, rotating and trimming its pieces accordingly (See Figure 5). By analyzing the ratio of rotated elements throughout the facade in different scenarios, and the global amount of rotation, the team of BIM consultants was able to fine-tune the behavior of the intelligent connection to simplify both fabrication and assembly (See Figure 6). Similarly, the team developed intelligent connections between the interior facades and the radial partition walls. The connections measured the angle between the facade and the partition walls and adjusted automatically to their particular condition. When these “smart” models were placed in its specific location in the facade, both the structure and the partition connections were updated and the extraction of data to support shop-drawings was automated: accelerating the flow of  information to the fabricator (See Figure 7).
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            Figure 6: Measuring performance in terms of required rotation.
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            Figure 7: Automatically generated unfold fabrication drawings for column casings
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            Figure 8: Visual Mockup and testing the Mashrabiya operation

             

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