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CNN: "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis"

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  • David Delaney
    I just watched the Saturday 8:00 PM airing of We were warned: tomorrow s oil crisis , on CNN. See schedule below for Sunday and Monday airings. The Saturday
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 18, 2006
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      I just watched the Saturday 8:00 PM airing of "We were
      warned: tomorrow's oil crisis", on CNN. See schedule below
      for Sunday and Monday airings. The Saturday 4:00 PM airing
      did not happen, although I got the text announcing it
      (below) from the CNN web site.

      It's a confused mish-mash. Worth watching though, for
      several reasons. E.g. to see the show avoiding mention of
      peak oil and the inexorable progressive decline of oil
      production that will follow it. You can bet your bippy that
      everyone involved in the production of the show knew a lot
      about peak oil. You can bet your bippy that several of their
      guests mentioned peak oil--Simmons at least. Several
      utterance of "peak oil" must have wound up on the cutting
      room floor. (Do they still have cutting room floors?
      Probably not.) By the way, they did an excellent job of
      making Simmons look like a nut.

      It is interesting to ask oneself what constraint would have
      kept them from allowing the show to mention the one concept
      that would have given coherence and focus to the show, a
      concept almost certainly well known to the producers.

      David Delaney, Ottawa


      >Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2006 18:38:21 -0500
      >From: David Delaney <ddelaney@...>
      >Subject: CNN: "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis"
      >
      >Might be an interesting program:
      >
      >"We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis, What if a hurricane wiped out Houston, Texas, and terrorists attacked oil production in Saudi Arabia? CNN Presents looks at a hypothetical scenario about the vulnerability of the world's oil supply, the world's remaining sources of oil and explores the potential of alternative fuels. Airs: March 18 and 19 at 8 p.m., 11 p.m. ET"
      >
      >Airs again without commercials early Monday morning on CNN Classroom Edition:
      >
      >"We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis" Set your VCR to record the CNN Presents Classroom Edition: We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis when it airs commercial-free on Monday, March 20, 2006, from 4:00 - 5:00 a.m. ET on CNN.
      >
      >David Delaney, Ottawa
    • toilforoil
      Did anyone really expect any better from CNN? Below is a piece on another facet of peak oil, which sums up quite accurately the shite being fed consumers of
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 18, 2006
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        Did anyone really expect any better from CNN? Below is a piece on
        another facet of peak oil, which sums up quite accurately the shite
        being fed consumers of USMedia Inc..

        doug gabelmann
        ottawa

        The farcical end of the American dream

        The US press is supposed to be challenging the lies of this war

        By Robert Fisk

        03/18/06 "The Independent" -- -- It is a bright winter morning and I
        am sipping my first coffee of the day in Los Angeles. My eye moves
        like a radar beam over the front page of the Los Angeles Times for
        the word that dominates the minds of all Middle East correspondents:
        Iraq. In post-invasion, post-Judith Miller mode, the American press
        is supposed to be challenging the lies of this war. So the story
        beneath the headline "In a Battle of Wits, Iraq's Insurgency
        Mastermind Stays a Step Ahead of US" deserves to be read. Or does it?

        Datelined Washington - an odd city in which to learn about Iraq, you
        might think - its opening paragraph reads: "Despite the recent arrest
        of one of his would-be suicide bombers in Jordan and some top aides
        in Iraq, insurgency mastermind Abu Musab Zarqawi has eluded capture,
        US authorities say, because his network has a much better
        intelligence-gathering operation than they do."

        Now quite apart from the fact that many Iraqis - along, I have to
        admit, with myself - have grave doubts about whether Zarqawi exists,
        and that al-Qai'da's Zarqawi, if he does exist, does not merit the
        title of "insurgency mastermind", the words that caught my eye
        were "US authorities say". And as I read through the report, I note
        how the Los Angeles Times sources this extraordinary tale. I thought
        American reporters no longer trusted the US administration, not after
        the mythical weapons of mass destruction and the equally mythical
        connections between Saddam and the international crimes against
        humanity of 11 September 2001. Of course, I was wrong.

        Here are the sources - on pages one and 10 for the yarn spun by
        reporters Josh Meyer and Mark Mazzetti: "US officials said", "said
        one US Justice Department counter-terrorism official", "Officials ...
        said", "those officials said", "the officials confirmed", "American
        officials complained", "the US officials stressed", "US authorities
        believe", "said one senior US intelligence official", "US officials
        said", "Jordanian officials ... said" - here, at least is some light
        relief - "several US officials said", "the US officials
        said", "American officials said", "officials say", "say US
        officials", "US officials said", "one US counter-terrorism official
        said".

        I do truly treasure this story. It proves my point that the Los
        Angeles Times - along with the big east coast dailies - should all be
        called US OFFICIALS SAY. But it's not just this fawning on political
        power that makes me despair. Let's move to a more recent example of
        what I can only call institutionalised racism in American reporting
        of Iraq. I have to thank reader Andrew Gorman for this gem, a January
        Associated Press report about the killing of an Iraqi prisoner under
        interrogation by US Chief Warrant Officer Lewis Welshofer Jnr.

        Mr Welshofer, it transpired in court, had stuffed the Iraqi General
        Abed Hamed Mowhoush head-first into a sleeping bag and sat on his
        chest, an action which - not surprisingly - caused the general to
        expire. The military jury ordered - reader, hold your breath - a
        reprimand for Mr Welshofer, the forfeiting of $6,000 of his salary
        and confinement to barracks for 60 days. But what caught my eye was
        the sympathetic detail. Welshofer's wife's Barbara, the AP told
        us, "testified that she was worried about providing for their three
        children if her husband was sentenced to prison. 'I love him more for
        fighting this,' she said, tears welling up in her eyes. 'He's always
        said that you need to do the right thing, and sometimes the right
        thing is the hardest thing to do'".

        Yes, I guess torture is tough on the torturer. But try this from the
        same report: "Earlier in the day ... Mr Welshofer fought back
        tears. 'I deeply apologise if my actions tarnish the soldiers serving
        in Iraq,' he said."

        Note how the American killer's remorse is directed not towards his
        helpless and dead victim but to the honour of his fellow soldiers,
        even though an earlier hearing had revealed that some of his
        colleagues watched Welshofer stuffing the general into the sleeping
        bag and did nothing to stop him. An earlier AP report stated
        that "officials" - here we go again - "believed Mowhoush had
        information that would 'break the back of the insurgency'." Wow. The
        general knew all about 40,000 Iraqi insurgents. So what a good idea
        to stuff him upside down inside a sleeping bag and sit on his chest.

        But the real scandal about these reports is we're not told anything
        about the general's family. Didn't he have a wife? I imagine the
        tears were "welling up in her eyes" when she was told her husband had
        been done to death. Didn't the general have children? Or parents? Or
        any loved ones who "fought back tears" when told of this vile deed?
        Not in the AP report he didn't. General Mowhoush comes across as an
        object, a dehumanised creature who wouldn't let the Americans "break
        the back" of the insurgency after being stuffed headfirst into a
        sleeping bag.

        Now let's praise the AP. On an equally bright summer's morning in
        Australia a few days ago I open the Sydney Morning Herald. It tells
        me, on page six, that the news agency, using the Freedom of
        Information Act, has forced US authorities to turn over 5,000 pages
        of transcripts of hearings at the Guantanamo Bay prison camp. One of
        them records the trial of since-released British prisoner Feroz
        Abbasi, in which Mr Abbasi vainly pleads with his judge, a US air
        force colonel, to reveal the evidence against him, something he says
        he has a right to hear under international law.

        And here is what the American colonel replied: "Mr Abbasi, your
        conduct is unacceptable and this is your absolute final warning. I do
        not care about international law. I do not want to hear the words
        international law. We are not concerned about international law."

        Alas, these words - which symbolise the very end of the American
        dream - are buried down the story. The colonel, clearly a disgrace to
        the uniform he wears, does not appear in the bland headline ("US
        papers tell Guantanamo inmates' stories") of the Sydney paper, more
        interested in telling us that the released documents identify by name
        the "farmers, shopkeepers or goatherds" held in Guantanamo.

        I am now in Wellington, New Zealand, watching on CNN Saddam Hussein's
        attack on the Baghdad court trying him. And suddenly, the ghastly
        Saddam disappears from my screen. The hearing will now proceed in
        secret, turning this drumhead court into even more of a farce. It is
        a disgrace. And what does CNN respectfully tell us? That the judge
        has "suspended media coverage"!

        If only, I say to myself, CNN - along with the American press - would
        do the same.

        --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com, David Delaney <ddelaney@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I just watched the Saturday 8:00 PM airing of "We were
        > warned: tomorrow's oil crisis", on CNN. See schedule below
        > for Sunday and Monday airings. The Saturday 4:00 PM airing
        > did not happen, although I got the text announcing it
        > (below) from the CNN web site.
        >
        > It's a confused mish-mash. Worth watching though, for
        > several reasons. E.g. to see the show avoiding mention of
        > peak oil and the inexorable progressive decline of oil
        > production that will follow it. You can bet your bippy that
        > everyone involved in the production of the show knew a lot
        > about peak oil. You can bet your bippy that several of their
        > guests mentioned peak oil--Simmons at least. Several
        > utterance of "peak oil" must have wound up on the cutting
        > room floor. (Do they still have cutting room floors?
        > Probably not.) By the way, they did an excellent job of
        > making Simmons look like a nut.
        >
        > It is interesting to ask oneself what constraint would have
        > kept them from allowing the show to mention the one concept
        > that would have given coherence and focus to the show, a
        > concept almost certainly well known to the producers.
        >
        > David Delaney, Ottawa
        >
        >
        > >Date: Fri, 17 Mar 2006 18:38:21 -0500
        > >From: David Delaney <ddelaney@...>
        > >Subject: CNN: "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis"
        > >
        > >Might be an interesting program:
        > >
        > >"We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis, What if a hurricane wiped
        out Houston, Texas, and terrorists attacked oil production in Saudi
        Arabia? CNN Presents looks at a hypothetical scenario about the
        vulnerability of the world's oil supply, the world's remaining
        sources of oil and explores the potential of alternative fuels. Airs:
        March 18 and 19 at 8 p.m., 11 p.m. ET"
        > >
        > >Airs again without commercials early Monday morning on CNN
        Classroom Edition:
        > >
        > >"We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis" Set your VCR to record
        the CNN Presents Classroom Edition: We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil
        Crisis when it airs commercial-free on Monday, March 20, 2006, from
        4:00 - 5:00 a.m. ET on CNN.
        > >
        > >David Delaney, Ottawa
        >
      • Dave Scott
        I watched the We Were Warned: Tomorrow s Oil Crisis last night and it was basically the same-old,same old. Really, no mention of the need to change our way
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 19, 2006
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          I watched the "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis" last night and
          it was basically the same-old,same old. Really, no mention of the
          need to change our way of life where we have things like "walkable
          communities" or good dependable public transportation. No mention of
          what is probably the most important aspect of alternative sources of
          energy, namely EROEI. Why, you would think that every alternative
          that was mentioned on the program will be just as cheap in terms of
          EROEI and actual dollars as conventional oil products have been.

          Yes, I wonder what Matt Simmons really had to say to the folks at CNN.
          It looked like he did all that he could to temper what he really
          wanted to say.

          Well, maybe this is a start with the corporate media now having to
          prepare the general public in "baby steps" for what's to come.

          Dave Scott
          Johnstown, PA, USA
        • dmathew1
          Hello Doug, ... another facet of peak oil, which sums up quite accurately the shite being fed consumers of USMedia Inc.. The program was not entirely terrible.
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 19, 2006
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            Hello Doug,

            > Did anyone really expect any better from CNN? Below is a piece on
            another facet of peak oil, which sums up quite accurately the shite
            being fed consumers of USMedia Inc..

            The program was not entirely terrible. The general public can
            understand hurricanes and terrorist attacks much better than the
            concept of resource depletion and mathematical descriptions of
            Hubbert's Peak. If CNN had taken the technical scientific path
            probably 99% of the viewers would have turned to VH1 to watch
            some "reality" fluff instead.

            The hurricane scenario nearly occurred with Hurricane Rita. For
            many hours it appeared like Galveston would take a direct hit before
            the storm drifted to the North and hit Louisiana instead. At some
            point in the next twenty years Houston is going to get its
            hurricane. When that happens the American economy will probably
            collapse. It's inevitable and not necessarily a bad thing (except
            for the pain involved).

            What I found most distressing about the show was the blame which was
            decidedly pointing everywhere else except for the U.S. consumer.
            The terrorists do pose a direct threat to the Middle East oil supply
            but that danger would not exist if Americans were not consuming
            twice as much oil as we produce. The Chinese have a growing economy
            and therefore are consuming oil at an accelerating rate, yet their
            consumption is much lower than America's with a population four
            times as large.

            The American consumer apparently has a God-given right to consume
            everything. The only sinners in the world are the foreigners who
            infringe upon that right. The oil problem is presented as a problem
            of price only, the poverty and oppression which exist throughout the
            oil-producing world is apparently acceptable.

            But none of these efforts matter. The American public is not about
            to make any sacrifices in order to wean this country off of its
            addiction to oil, consumerism, debt and global pollution. That's
            why Nature is going to make these decisions for us.

            Sincerely,

            David Mathews
            http://www.geocities.com/dmathew1
          • Daniel J. Lavigne
            Dave Scott wrote: I watched the We Were Warned: Tomorrow s Oil Crisis last night and it was basically the same-old,same old. Really, no mention of the need
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 19, 2006
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              Dave Scott wrote:

              I watched the "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis" last night and
              it was basically the same-old,same old. Really, no mention of the
              need to change our way of life where we have things like "walkable
              communities" or good dependable public transportation. No mention of
              what is probably the most important aspect of alternative sources of
              energy, namely EROEI. Why, you would think that every alternative
              that was mentioned on the program will be just as cheap in terms of
              EROEI and actual dollars as conventional oil products have been.

              Yes, I wonder what Matt Simmons really had to say to the folks at CNN.
              It looked like he did all that he could to temper what he really
              wanted to say.

              Well, maybe this is a start with the corporate media now having to
              prepare the general public in "baby steps" for what's to come.

              Dave Scott
              Johnstown, PA, USA
              **************************************
              Unfortunately, such is the reality of a population that is lost to the
              madness of greed.

              Unfortunately, those "baby steps" will not help avert a collapse wherein all
              will blame all others for "their" circumstances.

              Such is the nature of animals that are still learning to "think".

              Such is the nature of animals that support, with their taxes, plans and
              preparation that mock their claim to being "Human".

              To a safer, saner and more caring world. To Duty.

              Daniel J. Lavigne
              46.06 N 80.29 W
              *******************************************************
              http://www.taxrefusal.com

              Painful realities:

              (1) "Peak Oil" is, most likely, now upon us.

              (2) Absent a worldwide recognition of one's duty to refuse to support
              societies that would be party to murder, wars for oil, leading to the murder
              of millions, are the unavoidable result.

              (3) Its time to rely on bikes and "ourselves", instead of vehicles and
              "armies".
              ------------ __o
              ----------- _'\<,_
              ---------- (_)/ (_)____________________________

              (With thanks to Mark - for the bike!!)
            • Stuart Studebaker
              From: Dave Scott Subject: Re: CNN: We Were Warned: Tomorrow s Oil Crisis I watched the We Were Warned: Tomorrow s Oil Crisis
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 19, 2006
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                From: "Dave Scott" <davescott@...>
                Subject: Re: CNN: "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis"

                I watched the "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis" last night and
                it was basically the same-old,same old. Really, no mention of the
                need to change our way of life where we have things like "walkable
                communities" or good dependable public transportation.

                <snip>

                Well, maybe this is a start with the corporate media now having to
                prepare the general public in "baby steps" for what's to come.

                ====================================================

                I agree. However, I'm looking at it from the other angle: rather than
                focus on the shortcomings of the piece (which were many) the simple
                FACT that it appeared on CNN *at all* is a major stride.

                As an educator, I can also assure you that it is nearly impossible to
                get the average human being to learn more than 3 simple facts in an
                hour or two, and when the delivery system is TV, even 3 is tough to get
                across.

                I think "We Were Warned" is the first major announcement (consider it a
                "fanfare" before the symphony that will soon/have to follow) of the new
                landscape. 9/11, Katrina and Iraq are kind of like "landing in Oz" - it
                was traumatic and resulted in the removal of a tyrant. But the REALLY
                scary stuff is ahead, and if we tell Dorothy about the flying monkeys
                NOW, she'll never go to the emerald city.

                Getting the simple IDEA of "peak oil" across to people is hard enough.
                Once they can wrap their minds around that, the language that surrounds
                the discussion can then introduce them to the more complex ideas that
                attend "peak oil", such as EROEI (I prefer ER/EI, because it describes
                the ratio, but oh well...), delivery infrastructure, necessary
                lifestyle changes, etc.

                If CNN said "OK, this is the deal: oil is about to peak in production
                and once that happens, the cost will climb. Eventually, it will cease
                to be a part of our lives. Given that our entire civilisation is
                completely dependent on the stuff, we are looking at major and painful
                changes that will affect the human species, forever. we must judge all
                future energy dources by the ER/EI equation, and anything that is less
                than 2:1 isn't worth bothering with, and anything that is less than 1:1
                is an energy sink and is a Really Bad Idea. To prevent a total
                collapse, you need to stop having so many kids, start growing your own
                food, use your own shit and piss to help nitrogenate the soil, give up
                the SUV and any vehicle that you can't propel yourself, put solar
                panels on your roof for some electricty and hot water, etc. etc. etc."

                I'm telling ya: the EYES WOULD GLAZE OVER. Instantly. And they would be
                made to feel "stupid". Yeah, I know - THEY ARE - but the if you rub
                their noses in it, they get insulted and huffy and then, like the
                spoiled children they are, will get all stubborn on you.

                So, I considered "We Were Warned" a qualified success in terms of its
                content. Its impact is something else and will only be properly judged
                with hindsight. If "We Were Warned" doesn't take, perhaps the next one
                will. I think a "drama" would do the best - a work of fiction on film,
                like "The Day After" did back i n1984, which really got people's
                attention on Nuclear War. Perhaps, a miniseries, like "Roots", will get
                the topic into people's heads and affecting their actions.

                The *one* good thing about peak oil is that there is a metric by which
                we can gauge the success of peak oil awareness, and that is the
                question of the "fast crash". Given the inexorable nature of
                thermodynamics, insofar as we can stay under the depletion curve and
                avoid catastrophe, we can say "We Did Our Job".

                Because it might take 15 years rather than 15 weeks to crash, I don't
                think it will be so smooth or simple; there will likely be major
                distruptions that will make it seem like a fast crash is upon us, but
                then we may bee brought back from the brink, and flutter down a little
                more - once again - it will be in hindsight when we can say "yeah -
                that was the crash."

                best,

                S2
                NJ

                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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              • David M. Delaney
                ... I disagree. The program creates anxiety without conveying an understanding of the underlying issues. It actually conveys false ideas about the problem. We
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 19, 2006
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                  --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com, "dmathew1" <dmathew1@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The program was not entirely terrible. The general public can
                  > understand hurricanes and terrorist attacks much better than the
                  > concept of resource depletion and mathematical descriptions of
                  > Hubbert's Peak. If CNN had taken the technical scientific path
                  > probably 99% of the viewers would have turned to VH1 to watch
                  > some "reality" fluff instead.

                  I disagree. The program creates anxiety without conveying an
                  understanding of the underlying issues. It actually conveys false
                  ideas about the problem. "We can drill our way out of the problem" was
                  said and not contradicted. The program was entirely terrible.

                  You don't have to be very technical to understand "Some experts
                  believe that the world's total yearly oil production is nearing an all
                  time peak after which it will decline year after year forever. These
                  experts believe the decline of oil production after the peak will be
                  approximately the same each year as the yearly increase of oil
                  production before the peak, about 2-1/2 percent. The change from a
                  constantly growing world oil production before the peak to a
                  constantly shrinking one after the peak would have profound economic
                  and social effects."

                  David Delaney, Ottawa
                • DJ
                  ... My comment: what Stu2 sez. Handy to have someone save me typing strokes by doing it first and better. My wife and I watched it, and thought it was not
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 19, 2006
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                    > From: "Dave Scott" <davescott@...>
                    >Subject: Re: CNN: "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis"
                    >
                    >I watched the "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis" last night and
                    >it was basically the same-old,same old.
                    >====================================================
                    >
                    >I agree. However, I'm looking at it from the other angle: rather than
                    >focus on the shortcomings of the piece (which were many) the simple
                    >FACT that it appeared on CNN *at all* is a major stride.
                    >
                    >As an educator, I can also assure you that it is nearly impossible to
                    >get the average human being to learn more than 3 simple facts in an
                    >hour or two, and when the delivery system is TV, even 3 is tough to get
                    >across.
                    >S2
                    >NJ

                    My comment: what Stu2 sez. Handy to have someone save me typing
                    strokes by doing it first and better.

                    My wife and I watched it, and thought it was not bad... due to the
                    miracle of 'low expectations'. The fact that they had Simmons, even
                    briefly, talking about "worst case scenarios" was good.

                    The estimable Mr. Studebaker has a good point about getting
                    information drummed into the heads of the masses. It's like towing
                    an oil tanker with dental floss (an original metaphor, if I'm not
                    mistaken). Possible in theory, but excruciatingly slow and easy to
                    break.

                    Hell, I spent 30 years giving press conferences and doing
                    documentaries, and APPEARING in hundreds of OTHER news stories and
                    documentaries about the dolphin kill in ETP fisheries, as did dozens
                    of other folks, and most people STILL think that dolphins die due to
                    throwing themselves into tuna nets for no particular reason. I think
                    many people are generally in some kind of furshlugginer fugue state
                    while in front of the TV (and seem to recall brainwaves reflect
                    this), meaning that it actually may not be that effective a tool for
                    learning unless a person is consciously taking notes. It's entirely
                    possible to put a phone number up after even a good documentary and
                    get 'way fewer than 1 call per million viewers. And THAT is designed
                    to catch them before they forget about it.

                    What I did miss seeing was the CNN stuff that energybulletin.net said
                    was going to be on on the 16th... with Roscoe Bartlett going on about
                    peak oil, etc. Didn't see it, dunno whether it was cut due to
                    "operation swarmer" (is it just me, or are they not even trying with
                    the names anymore?) or just came on the day before, offset due to
                    maybe energybulletin being done by brits or something.

                    anyhow, glad to see the piece.

                    dj
                    oahu

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • memills@aol.com
                    Th most egregious mis/dis-information presented both by CNN, and by the recent 60 Minutes segment, on Alberta tar sands is that the Canadian tar sands have
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 19, 2006
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                      Th most egregious mis/dis-information presented both
                      by CNN, and by the recent "60 Minutes" segment, on Alberta tar sands
                      is that the Canadian tar sands have enough oil to last for "the
                      next 100 - 200 years" (or, whatever heart warming figure was used).
                      And that their oil reserves are massive -- second only to Saudi Arabia.

                      Of course, they fail to mention that the maximum daily production
                      is expected to be only 2 - 3 mbpd -- a small fraction of world daily
                      consumption.

                      Without that information, the lay viewer comes away with
                      a shockingly naive false sense of security. E.g., "we don't need
                      to worry about oil running out -- we'll simply get our oil from the
                      Canadians," after the twilight in the Saudi desert turns to dusk...

                      Another problem was the presentation of ethanol in Brazil without
                      mention of ERoEI, and, how many years of repeated harvesting of crops
                      of sugar cane can the soil sustain before the it is depleted?

                      Hope for a techno-fix, something like tabletop cold fusion (!), to save us
                      from our
                      naivety before it is too late...

                      -- Mike
                      Santa Barbara, CA


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Dick Lawrence
                      Writer Steve Alten is working on the book now, tentatively titled The Shell Game (not named after the oil company!) He is the author of Meg and a stack of
                      Message 10 of 13 , Mar 20, 2006
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                        Writer Steve Alten is working on the book now, tentatively
                        titled "The Shell Game" (not named after the oil company!) He is
                        the author of "Meg" and a stack of other best-sellers; "Meg" - about
                        the discovery of assumed-extinct mega-sharks (Carcharodon Megalodon)
                        in the deepest Pacific waters - is "soon to be a major motion
                        picture". If this succeeds, Steve will have a track record with
                        Hollywood and a shot at bringing the consequences of Peak Oil to
                        movie screens - and a chance to imprint the message in very visual
                        form into the minds of millions of Americans who otherwise would
                        never see the message.

                        - Dick Lawrence
                        ASPO-USA

                        --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com, Stuart Studebaker
                        <misterstudebaker@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > From: "Dave Scott" <davescott@...>
                        > Subject: Re: CNN: "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis"
                        >
                        > Well, maybe this is a start with the corporate media now having to
                        > prepare the general public in "baby steps" for what's to come.
                        >
                        > =======================================================================================================>
                        If "We Were Warned" doesn't take, perhaps the next one will. I
                        think a "drama" would do the best - a work of fiction on film,
                        like "The Day After" did back i n1984, which really got people's
                        attention on Nuclear War. Perhaps, a miniseries, like "Roots", will
                        get the topic into people's heads and affecting their actions.
                        >

                        ~~~~~~~ EnergyResources Moderator Comment ~~~~~~~~

                        Think of the CNN energy bit as a learning experience. As the folks at CNN learn that it is their lives that will be affected by "Peak Oil" and its pervasive ramifications, we can expect more penetrating explorations to follow--with no guarantee of accuracy or message effectiveness, of course.

                        ~~~~~ EnergyResources Moderator Tom Robertson ~~~~~~
                      • DJ
                        ... I think they actually did mention 3 mbpd dj oahu
                        Message 11 of 13 , Mar 20, 2006
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                          >Of course, they fail to mention that the maximum daily production
                          >is expected to be only 2 - 3 mbpd -- a small fraction of world daily
                          >consumption.
                          >
                          > -- Mike
                          >Santa Barbara, CA

                          I think they actually did mention 3 mbpd

                          dj
                          oahu
                        • Stuart Studebaker
                          From: memills@aol.com Th most egregious mis/dis-information presented both by CNN, and by the recent 60 Minutes segment, on Alberta tar sands is that the
                          Message 12 of 13 , Mar 20, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            From: memills@...

                            Th most egregious mis/dis-information presented both
                            by CNN, and by the recent "60 Minutes" segment, on Alberta tar sands
                            is that the Canadian tar sands have enough oil to last for "the
                            next 100 - 200 years" (or, whatever heart warming figure was used).
                            And that their oil reserves are massive -- second only to Saudi
                            Arabia.

                            <snip>

                            ======================================================

                            I agree. what I'd like to point out though is this: Now that CNN (with
                            NPR, PBS, and Fox, one of the most mainstream news orgs I can think of)
                            has basically opened the door of the discussion, we can now look
                            forward to more detailed analysis. Just because We Were Warned was a
                            bit of a white wash, doesn't mean that it's the final word on the
                            subject - quite the contrary...

                            Eventually (hopefully soon) we'll see a report saying "Sure - there's
                            jillions of barrels of oil in Canada, but the production needs to be
                            ramped up geometrically to be useful, AND then there's this nasty
                            little problem with GLOBAL WARMING. DoH!"

                            Then we'll see a long piece like "We Were Warned" that will spell out
                            to the eating tards of the world the ER/EI equation. That will likely
                            occur as foes/competitors to less efficient systems come to the fore as
                            less-efficient systems get the nod from corrupt officials. It'll be
                            bark bark bark and woof woof woof. Eventually people will get a wee
                            tiny clue.

                            Example: Right after We Were Warned my (enclued but INCREDIBLEY lazy)
                            housemates called a friend who has PV on his roof and got the number
                            for the company to get their own PV installation. What convinced them?

                            Former CIA Chief Woolsey. My housemates are liberal lefty hippie types,
                            and when they saw that the former head of the CIA had PV and drove a
                            freakin' Prius with his bloody hands, their jaws dropped. The big
                            cluebat from the sky came down and bomped 'em a good one right 'tween
                            the eyes.

                            Now, if I can only get them to not leave all the freakin lights on, and
                            ditch the hot tub (god, hippies just piss me off), do the dishes by
                            hand, change the bulbs to CFL, switch the mood lights to LED, etc.,
                            replace the stupid water heater with localised water heat systems and a
                            solar hot water panel, they might actually almost stand a chance...

                            It's like that. As time goes on, more and more of these reports will
                            come out, and the discourse will sharpen as its sophistication
                            increases. We're talkin' SUV McMansion suburbia here folks- you can't
                            expect things to change overnight. As much of a whitewash "We Were
                            Warned" was, it IS a first step. Now it is up to us to keep up the
                            pressure and get them to level with people about the severity of the
                            problem and depth of the required solution - once people *FINALLY* get
                            a wee clue what is at stake, things will move and people will adjust.

                            We Were Warned opened up the conversation, and now we can continue that
                            conversation and develop appropriate solutions. The stakes are high,
                            but so are the rewards...

                            S2
                            NJ


                            __________________________________________________
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                          • Peter Clark
                            Here s an idea. Why not visit CNN.com, click on contact us , click on the CNN TV icon, click on CNN news tips then click on send a story idea to CNN .
                            Message 13 of 13 , Mar 21, 2006
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                              Here's an idea. Why not visit CNN.com, click on 'contact us', click on the
                              'CNN TV' icon, click on 'CNN news tips' then click on 'send a story idea to
                              CNN'. Then ask them to do a proper story on Peak Oil. You never know!

                              Cheers
                              Peter Clark
                              Wellington NZ

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "Stuart Studebaker" <misterstudebaker@...>
                              To: <energyresources@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2006 1:05 PM
                              Subject: [energyresources] Re: CNN: "We Were Warned: Tomorrow's Oil Crisis"


                              >
                              > From: memills@...
                              >
                              > Th most egregious mis/dis-information presented both
                              > by CNN, and by the recent "60 Minutes" segment, on Alberta tar sands
                              > is that the Canadian tar sands have enough oil to last for "the
                              > next 100 - 200 years" (or, whatever heart warming figure was used).
                              > And that their oil reserves are massive -- second only to Saudi
                              > Arabia.
                              >
                              > <snip>
                              >
                              > ======================================================
                              >
                              > I agree. what I'd like to point out though is this: Now that CNN (with
                              > NPR, PBS, and Fox, one of the most mainstream news orgs I can think of)
                              > has basically opened the door of the discussion, we can now look
                              > forward to more detailed analysis. Just because We Were Warned was a
                              > bit of a white wash, doesn't mean that it's the final word on the
                              > subject - quite the contrary...
                              >
                              > Eventually (hopefully soon) we'll see a report saying "Sure - there's
                              > jillions of barrels of oil in Canada, but the production needs to be
                              > ramped up geometrically to be useful, AND then there's this nasty
                              > little problem with GLOBAL WARMING. DoH!"
                              >
                              > Then we'll see a long piece like "We Were Warned" that will spell out
                              > to the eating tards of the world the ER/EI equation. That will likely
                              > occur as foes/competitors to less efficient systems come to the fore as
                              > less-efficient systems get the nod from corrupt officials. It'll be
                              > bark bark bark and woof woof woof. Eventually people will get a wee
                              > tiny clue.
                              >
                              > Example: Right after We Were Warned my (enclued but INCREDIBLEY lazy)
                              > housemates called a friend who has PV on his roof and got the number
                              > for the company to get their own PV installation. What convinced them?
                              >
                              > Former CIA Chief Woolsey. My housemates are liberal lefty hippie types,
                              > and when they saw that the former head of the CIA had PV and drove a
                              > freakin' Prius with his bloody hands, their jaws dropped. The big
                              > cluebat from the sky came down and bomped 'em a good one right 'tween
                              > the eyes.
                              >
                              > Now, if I can only get them to not leave all the freakin lights on, and
                              > ditch the hot tub (god, hippies just piss me off), do the dishes by
                              > hand, change the bulbs to CFL, switch the mood lights to LED, etc.,
                              > replace the stupid water heater with localised water heat systems and a
                              > solar hot water panel, they might actually almost stand a chance...
                              >
                              > It's like that. As time goes on, more and more of these reports will
                              > come out, and the discourse will sharpen as its sophistication
                              > increases. We're talkin' SUV McMansion suburbia here folks- you can't
                              > expect things to change overnight. As much of a whitewash "We Were
                              > Warned" was, it IS a first step. Now it is up to us to keep up the
                              > pressure and get them to level with people about the severity of the
                              > problem and depth of the required solution - once people *FINALLY* get
                              > a wee clue what is at stake, things will move and people will adjust.
                              >
                              > We Were Warned opened up the conversation, and now we can continue that
                              > conversation and develop appropriate solutions. The stakes are high,
                              > but so are the rewards...
                              >
                              > S2
                              > NJ
                              >
                              >
                              > __________________________________________________
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                              > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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