Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Fwd: From Certainty to Uncertainty: The Story of Science and Ideas in the Twentieth Century

Expand Messages
  • William Tamblyn
    ... wrote: Journal of the American Medical Association Table of Contents - November 20, 2002 Vol 288, No 19, pp 2359-2498
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 20, 2002
      --- In evolutionary-psychology@y..., "Ian Pitchford"
      <ian.pitchford@s...> wrote: Journal of the American Medical
      Association Table of Contents - November 20, 2002 Vol 288, No 19, pp
      2359-2498 http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v288n19/toc.html

      Books/Science

      From Certainty to Uncertainty: The Story of Science and Ideas in the
      Twentieth Century by F. David Peat, 230 pp, $24.95, ISBN 0-309-07641-
      2, Washington, DC, Joseph Henry Press, 2002 (text available at
      http://www.nap.edu).

      Reviewed by Saty Satya-Murti, MD

      Early in the 20th century we were giddy and confident in the
      knowledge that rational thinking would solve many of our ills.
      Science would provide an abundance of food and energy. Peace and
      prosperity were within reach. No accomplishment remained beyond the
      grasp of enlightened thought. Certainty was the zeitgeist of this
      early modern period.

      Today, 100 years later, we face environmental deterioration, emerging
      infections, bioterrorism, and doubts about our earth's ability to
      sustain us. We did not anticipate this transition from cocky
      certainty to disquieting uncertainty. Our views and our Western
      emphasis on science and progress may have led us to this state.

      This transition is one recurrent theme of From Certainty to
      Uncertainty, by physicist, independent researcher, author,
      consultant, and accessible recluse David Peat. He introduces us to
      Kelvin, Bohr, Einstein, Russell, and other prominent, early 20th-
      century giants of the physical world. Their Newtonian ideals
      eventually yielded to uncertainty with the birth of quantum theory and
      Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. As relativism and postmodernism
      also entered our awareness, we began to realize that there are limits
      to our abilities. Our intellect has horizons, and, as doubt enters,
      certainty exits.

      Full text
      http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v288n19/ffull/jbk1120-1.html

      From Certainty to Uncertainty: The Story of Science and Ideas in the
      Twentieth Century by F. David Peat Hardcover: 248 pages ;
      Dimensions (in inches): 0.90 x 9.32 x 6.22 Publisher: Joseph Henry
      Press; ISBN: 0309076412; 1st edition (May 2002)
      AMAZON - US
      http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0309076412/darwinanddarwini/
      AMAZON - UK
      http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0309076412/humannaturecom/

      Editorial Reviews

      From Publishers Weekly

      At the same time that 20th-century science brought unprecedented
      advances, it also led to the growing awareness of the limitations of
      scientific knowledge itself. Through wonderfully concise, clear
      metaphors, physicist Peat (Infinite Potential) traces the philosophy
      of science from the 19th through the 20th centuries, showing how the
      earlier era¡s faith in the reliability of scientific research, and
      its belief that it was theoretically possible to predict the behavior
      of everything from particles to people, was abruptly shaken in the
      20th century. Peat focuses especially on how the theory of
      relativity, quantum mechanics and chaos theory brought about
      cataclysmic changes in our worldview.
      Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

      From Book News, Inc.
      A popular science writer and physicist who created the Pari Center
      for New Learning in Italy traces the substitution in science and
      other fields of a new world view tolerating uncertainty for that of a
      deterministic universe. Includes a post-9/11 postscript, and appendix
      on Godel's meta-mathematical theorem. Includes a few footnoted
      references.Book News, Inc.®, Portland, OR

      NEW SCIENTIST, June 2002
      "...impressively wide-ranging study ...immensely thought- provoking
      book"

      METAPSYCHOLOGY ONLINE REVIEW, June 2002
      "...remarkably lucid.full of philosophical wisdom. ... An admirable
      companion."

      Physics World, July 2002
      "This well written and easily read book is intended for a general
      audience..."

      The Constant Reader, June 2002
      "This book, which is reader-friendly even to the scientifically
      challenged, should go on every bookshelf."

      Book Description
      Early theorists believed that in science lay the promise of
      certainty. Built on a foundation of fact and constructed with
      objective and trustworthy tools, science produced knowledge. But
      science has also shown us that this knowledge will always be
      fundamentally incomplete and that a true understanding of the world
      is ultimately beyond our grasp.

      In this thoughtful and compelling book, physicist F. David Peat
      examines the basic philosophic difference between the certainty that
      characterized the thinking of humankind through the nineteenth
      century and contrasts it with the startling fall of certainty in the
      twentieth. The nineteenth century was marked by a boundless optimism
      and confidence in the power of progress and technology. Science and
      philosophy were on firm ground. Newtonian physics showed that the
      universe was a gigantic clockwork mechanism that functioned according
      to rigid laws-that its course could be predicted with total
      confidence far into the future. Indeed, in 1900, the President of the
      Royal Society in Britain went so far as to proclaim that everything
      of importance had already been discovered by science.

      But it was not long before the seeds of a scientific revolution began
      to take root. Quantum Theory and the General Theory of Relativity
      exploded the clockwork universe, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt
      that our knowledge was, at best, incomplete-and would probably remain
      that way forever. There were places in the universe, such as black
      holes, from which no information at all could ever be obtained. Chaos
      Theory also demonstrated our inherent limits to knowing, predicting,
      and controlling the world around us and showed the way that chaos can
      often be found at the heart of natural and social systems.

      Although we may not always recognize it, this new world view has had
      a profound effect not only on science, but on art, literature,
      philosophy, and societal relations. The twenty-first century now
      begins with a humble acceptance of uncertainty.

      From Certainty to Uncertainty traces the rise and fall of the
      deterministic universe and shows the evolving influences that such
      disparate disciplines now have on one another. Drawing on the lessons
      we can learn from history, Peat also speculates on how we will manage
      our lives into the future.

      Book Info
      Traces the rise and fall of the deterministic universe and shows the
      evolving influences that such disparate disciplines now have on one
      another. Drawing on the lessons we can learn from history, Peat also
      speculates on how we will manage our lives into the future. Softcover.

      From the Inside Flap
      "F. David Peat takes us on a wide-ranging, intellectual journey
      through the major scientific ideas of the 20th century, from physics
      and complexity to psychology and ecology. It's a grand, exhilarating
      tour of the post-modern world." -- Marcia Bartusiak, author of
      Einstein's Unfinished Symphony

      "Lucid, engaging, provocative... simply brilliant. Peat delivers a
      fascinating take on why uncertainty in quantum physics intimately
      affects every aspect of our lives and thoughts. This timely book
      should be required reading for anybody who cares about where we all
      go from here." -- James Burke, author of Circles: Fifty Round-Trips
      Through History, Technology, Science, Culture

      "The journey from certainty to uncertainty is not confined to a
      scientific tale. It is the story of how human thought has changed in
      every aspect so that we now live in an age where the only certainty
      is uncertainty. By making his story an intimate one and absorbing the
      reader with the very human nature of intellectual revolution, David
      Peat has done a wonderful job of illustrating how our vision of the
      universe has changed so radically, so quickly." -- Michael White,
      author of The Pope and the Heretic and Leonardo: The First
      Scientist

      About the Author
      F. David Peat was born in Liverpool, England. He completed his Ph.D.
      at the University of Liverpool. He was engaged in research in
      theoretical physics at the National Research Council of Canada for
      many years and had ongoing discussions on the foundations of physics
      with the late David Bohm. In 1996, Peat moved to the medieval village
      of Pari, Italy, where he created the Pari Center for New Learning,
      where people can explore the new paradigms created by science and
      think about society's meanings and values. Peat is a Fellow of the
      World Academy of Art and Science and a Corresponding Member of the
      European Academy of Arts, Science, and the Humanities. He is author
      of over 20 books including: The Blackwinged Night: Creativity in
      Nature and Mind and Infinite Potential: The Life and Times of David
      Bohm.
    • Tom Robertson
      Folks: Thanks to William Tamblyn the note on from Certainty to Uncertainty: The Story of Science and Ideas in the Twentieth Century by F. David Peat, 230 pp,
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 20, 2002
        Folks:

        Thanks to William Tamblyn the note on from Certainty to Uncertainty: The
        Story of Science and Ideas in the Twentieth Century by F. David Peat, 230
        pp, $24.95, ISBN 0-309-07641-2, Washington, DC, Joseph Henry Press, 2002
        (text available at
        http://www.nap.edu).

        You should also note that the Joseph Henry Press is an imprint of "nap"
        which in in the url above stands for National Academy Press, a part of the
        National Academy of Sciences

        I have ordered the book, and should have a better understanding of its
        content in a few days.

        However, based on all the reviews I can find, I see this book--and the
        publisher and and related institutions as well, as standing as a substantial
        indictment of our dominant intellectual traditions. I bet it is also a very
        lucid description of how reductionist science is almost totally incapable of
        addressing the real issues facing our society; like energy resources and the
        changes in their availability that we are increasingly being introduced to
        as each day passes.

        Of course there are alternatives, but I will wait till I actually read CtU
        before I comment on all that.

        Tom Robertson, Moderator, EnergyResources Group
        (39°53'N 76° 59'W)


        Reviewed by Saty Satya-Murti, MD

        Early in the 20th century we were giddy and confident in the
        knowledge that rational thinking would solve many of our ills.
        Science would provide an abundance of food and energy. Peace and
        prosperity were within reach. No accomplishment remained beyond the
        grasp of enlightened thought. Certainty was the zeitgeist of this
        early modern period.

        Today, 100 years later, we face environmental deterioration, emerging
        infections, bioterrorism, and doubts about our earth's ability to
        sustain us. We did not anticipate this transition from cocky
        certainty to disquieting uncertainty. Our views and our Western
        emphasis on science and progress may have led us to this state.

        This transition is one recurrent theme of From Certainty to
        Uncertainty, by physicist, independent researcher, author,
        consultant, and accessible recluse David Peat. He introduces us to
        Kelvin, Bohr, Einstein, Russell, and other prominent, early 20th-
        century giants of the physical world. Their Newtonian ideals
        eventually yielded to uncertainty with the birth of quantum theory and
        Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. As relativism and postmodernism
        also entered our awareness, we began to realize that there are limits
        to our abilities. Our intellect has horizons, and, as doubt enters,
        certainty exits.

        Full text
        http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v288n19/ffull/jbk1120-1.html

        From Certainty to Uncertainty: The Story of Science and Ideas in the
        Twentieth Century by F. David Peat Hardcover: 248 pages ;
        Dimensions (in inches): 0.90 x 9.32 x 6.22 Publisher: Joseph Henry
        Press; ISBN: 0309076412; 1st edition (May 2002)
        AMAZON - US
        http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0309076412/darwinanddarwini/
        AMAZON - UK
        http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0309076412/humannaturecom/

        Editorial Reviews

        From Publishers Weekly

        At the same time that 20th-century science brought unprecedented
        advances, it also led to the growing awareness of the limitations of
        scientific knowledge itself. Through wonderfully concise, clear
        metaphors, physicist Peat (Infinite Potential) traces the philosophy
        of science from the 19th through the 20th centuries, showing how the
        earlier era¡s faith in the reliability of scientific research, and
        its belief that it was theoretically possible to predict the behavior
        of everything from particles to people, was abruptly shaken in the
        20th century. Peat focuses especially on how the theory of
        relativity, quantum mechanics and chaos theory brought about
        cataclysmic changes in our worldview.
        Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

        From Book News, Inc.
        A popular science writer and physicist who created the Pari Center
        for New Learning in Italy traces the substitution in science and
        other fields of a new world view tolerating uncertainty for that of a
        deterministic universe. Includes a post-9/11 postscript, and appendix
        on Godel's meta-mathematical theorem. Includes a few footnoted
        references.Book News, Inc.®, Portland, OR

        NEW SCIENTIST, June 2002
        "...impressively wide-ranging study ...immensely thought- provoking
        book"

        METAPSYCHOLOGY ONLINE REVIEW, June 2002
        "...remarkably lucid.full of philosophical wisdom. ... An admirable
        companion."

        Physics World, July 2002
        "This well written and easily read book is intended for a general
        audience..."

        The Constant Reader, June 2002
        "This book, which is reader-friendly even to the scientifically
        challenged, should go on every bookshelf."

        Book Description
        Early theorists believed that in science lay the promise of
        certainty. Built on a foundation of fact and constructed with
        objective and trustworthy tools, science produced knowledge. But
        science has also shown us that this knowledge will always be
        fundamentally incomplete and that a true understanding of the world
        is ultimately beyond our grasp.

        In this thoughtful and compelling book, physicist F. David Peat
        examines the basic philosophic difference between the certainty that
        characterized the thinking of humankind through the nineteenth
        century and contrasts it with the startling fall of certainty in the
        twentieth. The nineteenth century was marked by a boundless optimism
        and confidence in the power of progress and technology. Science and
        philosophy were on firm ground. Newtonian physics showed that the
        universe was a gigantic clockwork mechanism that functioned according
        to rigid laws-that its course could be predicted with total
        confidence far into the future. Indeed, in 1900, the President of the
        Royal Society in Britain went so far as to proclaim that everything
        of importance had already been discovered by science.

        But it was not long before the seeds of a scientific revolution began
        to take root. Quantum Theory and the General Theory of Relativity
        exploded the clockwork universe, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt
        that our knowledge was, at best, incomplete-and would probably remain
        that way forever. There were places in the universe, such as black
        holes, from which no information at all could ever be obtained. Chaos
        Theory also demonstrated our inherent limits to knowing, predicting,
        and controlling the world around us and showed the way that chaos can
        often be found at the heart of natural and social systems.

        Although we may not always recognize it, this new world view has had
        a profound effect not only on science, but on art, literature,
        philosophy, and societal relations. The twenty-first century now
        begins with a humble acceptance of uncertainty.

        From Certainty to Uncertainty traces the rise and fall of the
        deterministic universe and shows the evolving influences that such
        disparate disciplines now have on one another. Drawing on the lessons
        we can learn from history, Peat also speculates on how we will manage
        our lives into the future.

        Book Info
        Traces the rise and fall of the deterministic universe and shows the
        evolving influences that such disparate disciplines now have on one
        another. Drawing on the lessons we can learn from history, Peat also
        speculates on how we will manage our lives into the future. Softcover.

        From the Inside Flap
        "F. David Peat takes us on a wide-ranging, intellectual journey
        through the major scientific ideas of the 20th century, from physics
        and complexity to psychology and ecology. It's a grand, exhilarating
        tour of the post-modern world." -- Marcia Bartusiak, author of
        Einstein's Unfinished Symphony

        "Lucid, engaging, provocative... simply brilliant. Peat delivers a
        fascinating take on why uncertainty in quantum physics intimately
        affects every aspect of our lives and thoughts. This timely book
        should be required reading for anybody who cares about where we all
        go from here." -- James Burke, author of Circles: Fifty Round-Trips
        Through History, Technology, Science, Culture

        "The journey from certainty to uncertainty is not confined to a
        scientific tale. It is the story of how human thought has changed in
        every aspect so that we now live in an age where the only certainty
        is uncertainty. By making his story an intimate one and absorbing the
        reader with the very human nature of intellectual revolution, David
        Peat has done a wonderful job of illustrating how our vision of the
        universe has changed so radically, so quickly." -- Michael White,
        author of The Pope and the Heretic and Leonardo: The First
        Scientist

        About the Author
        F. David Peat was born in Liverpool, England. He completed his Ph.D.
        at the University of Liverpool. He was engaged in research in
        theoretical physics at the National Research Council of Canada for
        many years and had ongoing discussions on the foundations of physics
        with the late David Bohm. In 1996, Peat moved to the medieval village
        of Pari, Italy, where he created the Pari Center for New Learning,
        where people can explore the new paradigms created by science and
        think about society's meanings and values. Peat is a Fellow of the
        World Academy of Art and Science and a Corresponding Member of the
        European Academy of Arts, Science, and the Humanities. He is author
        of over 20 books including: The Blackwinged Night: Creativity in
        Nature and Mind and Infinite Potential: The Life and Times of David
        Bohm.




        Your message didn't show up on the list? Complaints or compliments?
        Drop me (Tom Robertson) a note at t1r@...

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Chester Walls
        Reading the following I find this is words of the most dangerous kind, As in: We thought science would enable us to do and know everything, the future would
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 21, 2002
          Reading the following I find this is words of the most dangerous kind,
          As in:

          We thought science would enable us to do and know everything, the future
          would all be roses, but gosh suddenly the world is turning to custard
          and the future looks grim.
          Everything we do (based on science) doesn’t quite go a planned, science
          no longer knows everything, in fact it looks like there is lots of stuff
          that is simply unknowable (must be god), hence science is to blame for
          where we are.

          It is not our fault lets point the finger at science.

          Hubbert sums up the response perfectly,

          "Our ignorance is not so vast as our failure to use what we know."
          M. King Hubbert.

          We have had a technological civilisation for a few hundred years, the
          universe has been around for the better part of 15 billion years, we are
          babes in the woods, the
          chances of us even beginning to scratch the surface of Knowledge at
          this stage of our existence is remote. We are the 2 year old with the
          bombs, we are not responsible for our own actions.

          Science is not to blame, we are

          Once again check the mirror, know yourself and then think about the
          stretch of time before us. We have blown it.

          Chester.

          > Early in the 20th century we were giddy and confident in the
          > knowledge that rational thinking would solve many of our ills.
          > Science would provide an abundance of food and energy. Peace and
          > prosperity were within reach. No accomplishment remained beyond the
          > grasp of enlightened thought. Certainty was the zeitgeist of this
          > early modern period.
          >
          > Today, 100 years later, we face environmental deterioration, emerging
          > infections, bioterrorism, and doubts about our earth's ability to
          > sustain us. We did not anticipate this transition from cocky
          > certainty to disquieting uncertainty. Our views and our Western
          > emphasis on science and progress may have led us to this state.
          >
          > This transition is one recurrent theme of From Certainty to
          > Uncertainty, by physicist, independent researcher, author,
          > consultant, and accessible recluse David Peat. He introduces us to
          > Kelvin, Bohr, Einstein, Russell, and other prominent, early 20th-
          > century giants of the physical world. Their Newtonian ideals
          > eventually yielded to uncertainty with the birth of quantum theory and
          > Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. As relativism and postmodernism
          > also entered our awareness, we began to realize that there are limits
          > to our abilities. Our intellect has horizons, and, as doubt enters,
          > certainty exits.
          >
          > Full text
          > http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v288n19/ffull/jbk1120-1.html
          >
          > >From Certainty to Uncertainty: The Story of Science and Ideas in the
          > Twentieth Century by F. David Peat Hardcover: 248 pages ;
          > Dimensions (in inches): 0.90 x 9.32 x 6.22 Publisher: Joseph Henry
          > Press; ISBN: 0309076412; 1st edition (May 2002)
          > AMAZON - US
          > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0309076412/darwinanddarwini/
          > AMAZON - UK
          > http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0309076412/humannaturecom/
          >
          > Editorial Reviews
          >
          > >From Publishers Weekly
          >
          > At the same time that 20th-century science brought unprecedented
          > advances, it also led to the growing awareness of the limitations of
          > scientific knowledge itself. Through wonderfully concise, clear
          > metaphors, physicist Peat (Infinite Potential) traces the philosophy
          > of science from the 19th through the 20th centuries, showing how the
          > earlier era¡s faith in the reliability of scientific research, and
          > its belief that it was theoretically possible to predict the behavior
          > of everything from particles to people, was abruptly shaken in the
          > 20th century. Peat focuses especially on how the theory of
          > relativity, quantum mechanics and chaos theory brought about
          > cataclysmic changes in our worldview.
          > Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.
          >
          > >From Book News, Inc.
          > A popular science writer and physicist who created the Pari Center
          > for New Learning in Italy traces the substitution in science and
          > other fields of a new world view tolerating uncertainty for that of a
          > deterministic universe. Includes a post-9/11 postscript, and appendix
          > on Godel's meta-mathematical theorem. Includes a few footnoted
          > references.Book News, Inc.®, Portland, OR
          >
          > NEW SCIENTIST, June 2002
          > "...impressively wide-ranging study ...immensely thought- provoking
          > book"
          >
          > METAPSYCHOLOGY ONLINE REVIEW, June 2002
          > "...remarkably lucid.full of philosophical wisdom. ... An admirable
          > companion."
          >
          > Physics World, July 2002
          > "This well written and easily read book is intended for a general
          > audience..."
          >
          > The Constant Reader, June 2002
          > "This book, which is reader-friendly even to the scientifically
          > challenged, should go on every bookshelf."
          >
          > Book Description
          > Early theorists believed that in science lay the promise of
          > certainty. Built on a foundation of fact and constructed with
          > objective and trustworthy tools, science produced knowledge. But
          > science has also shown us that this knowledge will always be
          > fundamentally incomplete and that a true understanding of the world
          > is ultimately beyond our grasp.
          >
          > In this thoughtful and compelling book, physicist F. David Peat
          > examines the basic philosophic difference between the certainty that
          > characterized the thinking of humankind through the nineteenth
          > century and contrasts it with the startling fall of certainty in the
          > twentieth. The nineteenth century was marked by a boundless optimism
          > and confidence in the power of progress and technology. Science and
          > philosophy were on firm ground. Newtonian physics showed that the
          > universe was a gigantic clockwork mechanism that functioned according
          > to rigid laws-that its course could be predicted with total
          > confidence far into the future. Indeed, in 1900, the President of the
          > Royal Society in Britain went so far as to proclaim that everything
          > of importance had already been discovered by science.
          >
          > But it was not long before the seeds of a scientific revolution began
          > to take root. Quantum Theory and the General Theory of Relativity
          > exploded the clockwork universe, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt
          > that our knowledge was, at best, incomplete-and would probably remain
          > that way forever. There were places in the universe, such as black
          > holes, from which no information at all could ever be obtained. Chaos
          > Theory also demonstrated our inherent limits to knowing, predicting,
          > and controlling the world around us and showed the way that chaos can
          > often be found at the heart of natural and social systems.
          >
          > Although we may not always recognize it, this new world view has had
          > a profound effect not only on science, but on art, literature,
          > philosophy, and societal relations. The twenty-first century now
          > begins with a humble acceptance of uncertainty.
          >
          > >From Certainty to Uncertainty traces the rise and fall of the
          > deterministic universe and shows the evolving influences that such
          > disparate disciplines now have on one another. Drawing on the lessons
          > we can learn from history, Peat also speculates on how we will manage
          > our lives into the future.
          >
          > Book Info
          > Traces the rise and fall of the deterministic universe and shows the
          > evolving influences that such disparate disciplines now have on one
          > another. Drawing on the lessons we can learn from history, Peat also
          > speculates on how we will manage our lives into the future. Softcover.
          >
          > >From the Inside Flap
          > "F. David Peat takes us on a wide-ranging, intellectual journey
          > through the major scientific ideas of the 20th century, from physics
          > and complexity to psychology and ecology. It's a grand, exhilarating
          > tour of the post-modern world." -- Marcia Bartusiak, author of
          > Einstein's Unfinished Symphony
          >
          > "Lucid, engaging, provocative... simply brilliant. Peat delivers a
          > fascinating take on why uncertainty in quantum physics intimately
          > affects every aspect of our lives and thoughts. This timely book
          > should be required reading for anybody who cares about where we all
          > go from here." -- James Burke, author of Circles: Fifty Round-Trips
          > Through History, Technology, Science, Culture
          >
          > "The journey from certainty to uncertainty is not confined to a
          > scientific tale. It is the story of how human thought has changed in
          > every aspect so that we now live in an age where the only certainty
          > is uncertainty. By making his story an intimate one and absorbing the
          > reader with the very human nature of intellectual revolution, David
          > Peat has done a wonderful job of illustrating how our vision of the
          > universe has changed so radically, so quickly." -- Michael White,
          > author of The Pope and the Heretic and Leonardo: The First
          > Scientist
          >
          > About the Author
          > F. David Peat was born in Liverpool, England. He completed his Ph.D.
          > at the University of Liverpool. He was engaged in research in
          > theoretical physics at the National Research Council of Canada for
          > many years and had ongoing discussions on the foundations of physics
          > with the late David Bohm. In 1996, Peat moved to the medieval village
          > of Pari, Italy, where he created the Pari Center for New Learning,
          > where people can explore the new paradigms created by science and
          > think about society's meanings and values. Peat is a Fellow of the
          > World Academy of Art and Science and a Corresponding Member of the
          > European Academy of Arts, Science, and the Humanities. He is author
          > of over 20 books including: The Blackwinged Night: Creativity in
          > Nature and Mind and Infinite Potential: The Life and Times of David
          > Bohm.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Your message didn't show up on the list? Complaints or compliments?
          > Drop me (Tom Robertson) a note at t1r@...
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.