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Why EIA, IEA, and Randers’ 2052 Energy Forecasts are Wrong

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  • Jay Hanson
    WordPress.com Gail Tverberg posted: What is correct way to model the future course of energy and the economy? There are clearly huge amounts of oil, coal, and
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 14, 2014
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      WordPress.com
      Gail Tverberg posted: "What is correct way to model the future course of energy and the economy? There are clearly huge amounts of oil, coal, and natural gas in the ground. �With different approaches, researchers can obtain vastly different indications. I will show that the rea"
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      New post on Our Finite World

      Why EIA, IEA, and Randers� 2052 Energy Forecasts are�Wrong

      by Gail Tverberg

      What is correct way to model the future course of energy and the economy? There are clearly huge amounts of oil, coal, and natural gas in the ground. �With different approaches, researchers can obtain vastly different indications. I will show that the real issue is most researchers are modeling the wrong limit.

      Most researchers assume that the limit that they should be concerned with is the amount of oil, coal, and natural gas in the ground. This is the wrong limit. While in theory we will eventually hit this limit, because of the way fossil fuels are integrated into the rest of the economy, we hit financial limits much earlier. These financial limits include lack of investment capital, inability of governments to collect enough taxes to fund their programs, and widespread debt defaults.

      One of the things I show in this post is that Economic Growth is a positive feedback loop that is enabled by cheap energy sources. (Economists have postulated that Economic Growth is permanent, and has no connection to energy sources.) Economic Growth turns to economic contraction as the cost of energy extraction (broadly defined) rises. It is the change in this feedback loop that leads to the financial problems mentioned above. �These effects tend to lead to collapse over a period of years (perhaps 10 or 20, we really don't know), rather than a slow decline which is easily mitigated.

      If, indeed, most analysts are concerned about the wrong limit, this has huge implications for energy policy:

      1. Climate change models include way too much CO2 from fossil fuels. Lack of investment capital will bring down production of all fossil fuels in only a few years. The amounts of fossil fuels included in climate change models are based on "Demand Model" and "Hubbert Peak Model" estimates of fossil fuel consumption (described in this post), both of which tend to be far too high. This is not to say that the climate isn't changing, and won't continue to change. It is just that excessive fossil fuel consumption needs to move much farther down our list of problems contributing to future climate change.

      2. It becomes much less clear whether high-priced replacements for fossil fuels are worthwhile. In theory, they might allow a particular economy to have electricity for a while longer after collapse, if the whole system can be kept properly repaired. Offsetting this potential benefit are several drawbacks: �(a) they make the economy with the high-priced replacements less competitive in the world marketplace, (b) they tend to run up debt, increase government spending, and decrease discretionary income of citizens, all limits we are reaching, and (c) they tend to push the economic cycle more quickly toward contraction for the country purchasing the high-priced renewables.

      3. A large share of academic writing is premised on a wrong understanding of the real limits we are reaching. Since writers base their analyses on the wrong analyses of previous writers, this leads to a nearly endless supply of misleading or wrong academic papers.

      This post is related to a recent post I wrote,�The Real Oil Extraction Limit, and How It Affects the�Downslope.

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