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Re: Water bills 'to double again'

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  • szoraster
    ... Some Australian writers think they could have done dams. Well, except the Labor government was afraid of Global Warming: http://tinyurl.com/2c3fb4m
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 31 6:13 PM
      --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com, brent_ns <brent_ns1@...> wrote:
      >
      > THE true costs of Australia's largest desalination plant are
      > becoming clearer, with Melburnians said to be facing another
      > doubling of water bills to pay for the Brumby government's $5.7
      > billion plant.
      >

      Some Australian writers think they could have done dams. Well, except the Labor government was afraid of Global Warming:

      http://tinyurl.com/2c3fb4m

      Remember when the Victorian Labor Government said it couldn't build a new dam because global warming was drying up the rains?

      Melbourne has had its wettest October since 1975, with 135.4 millimetres of rain falling in the city by late yesterday, about 70 millimetres more than the monthly average.

      (A search on "Andrew Bold Water Dams" will provide a history of his critique of the desalination option.)

      Steven Zoraster
    • Frank Holland
      $A1.6 is about £1; right now I am paying just under £4 for water. The Ozzies have been paying much too little. Frank
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 1, 2010
        $A1.6 is about £1; right now I am paying just under £4 for water. The
        Ozzies have been paying much too little.

        Frank

        On Sun, 2010-10-31 at 14:19 -0700, brent_ns wrote:
        >
        > THE true costs of Australia's largest desalination plant are becoming
        > clearer, with Melburnians said to be facing another doubling of water
        > bills to pay for the Brumby government's $5.7 billion plant.
        >
        > Consumers, who have already been slugged with a doubling of bills from
        > 2009 to 2013, face further hikes as Melbourne Water's costs soar, an
        > analysis of Auditor-General figures shows.
        >
        > In the face of the government's repeated refusals to reveal the bill
        > increases for desalinated water, the opposition has analysed figures
        > in the Auditor-General's October finance report and found that
        > Melbourne Water's costs per kilolitre, or 1000 litres, could increase
        > by up to 130 per cent.
        > Advertisement: Story continues below
        >
        > These costs are passed on to the retail water companies - City West
        > Water, South East Water and Yarra Valley Water - which then pass them
        > on to customers.
        >
        > On average, the retailers pay Melbourne Water 70¢ a kilolitre. But the
        > opposition's figures show that once the desalination plant is
        > operating, it will cost Melbourne Water $1.60 to buy a kilolitre of
        > water.
        >
        > ''These figures show there will be a dramatic rise in Melbourne
        > Water's wholesale costs,'' Coalition scrutiny of government spokesman
        > David Davis said, warning that the rise could mean a quadrupling of
        > water prices.
        >
        > ''Victorian households should prepare to pay up to $2000 a year in
        > water bills … for the exorbitant mismanaged costs of the desalination
        > plant.''
        >
        > http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/state-election-2010/water-bills-to-double-again-20101030-17899.html?from=age_sb
        >
        > Creating wealth from our water
        >
        > IT may surprise you to know that for Australia, the worldwide water
        > situation is an opportunity more than a crisis.
        >
        > Unlike most of our food exporting competitors, our major population
        > centres are largely coastal and have water insurance in terms of
        > desalination plants. So our food bowls need not be drained by the
        > cities and can implement a wide range of productivity enhancements.
        > Hence, water is not a rigid constraint on either our population or our
        > production.
        > snip
        >
        > Second, that the idea that "science will tell us the answer" is
        > flawed, both because of the limitations of ecological knowledge, and
        > because balancing competing needs is a political and not a scientific
        > question.
        >
        > snip
        >
        > Professor John Briscoe, Harvard University is former head of Water at
        > the World Bank. Professor John Langford, Uniwater is former head of
        > the Rural Water Commission. Dr Michael Porter is national director,
        > CEDA Research and Policy
        >
        > http://www.theaustralian.com.au/creating-wealth-from-our-water/story-fn6nj4ny-1225945844874
        >
        > Dripping in cash: water chiefs flushed out
        >
        > WATER bosses have pocketed salary increases of up to tens of thousands
        > of dollars as Victorians suffer years of soaring bills.
        >
        > Chiefs are reaping performance bonuses and lucrative packages worth up
        > to $420,000 as households struggle with huge price rises and turn off
        > their taps.
        >
        > Bills for some families are surging up to $400 over four years to pay
        > for major projects including Wonthaggi's desalination plant and the
        > north-south pipeline.
        >
        > Welfare groups are campaigning for relief for pensioners and the
        > unemployed to cope with punishing costs.
        >
        > http://www.heraldsun.com.au/ipad-application/flushed-out-water-chiefs-cash-splash/story-fn6bfm6w-1225944921909
        >
        > Canada's Water Resources In Question
        >
        > Privatization of water and Albert's water allocation were hot topics
        > at a recent talk in Edmonton. Will Alberta's water be for sale?
        >
        > “Anything we can do to help you avoid our mistakes” Ian Douglas,
        > addressing the crowed on the mistakes Australia has made in water
        > allocation policies and urging Albertans not to follow Australia’s
        > example.
        > Australia has a highly deregulated water market, where private
        > ownership and speculative buying has driven the Murray Darling river
        > system in Australia to face critical water shortages. Critical water
        > shortages have forced the Austrian government to buy back water rights
        > for a sum of 5 billion, in order to conserve enough water in the basin
        > to protect the ecosystems. If water levels are to low for to long, the
        > river systems become unhealthy, essentially they fail to function
        > properly.
        > Water speculation in Australia, means precious water resources are
        > being bought up by large foreign entities and water speculators. It is
        > in the best interest of private water companies to maximize
        > consumption, by pushing farmers to grow water intensive monoculture
        > crops. Australia has no laws that protect the water rights of
        > citizens. Cash strapped territorial governments are also selling off
        > Australia’s publicly owned water infrastructure.
        > Many South American countries such as Chili have private water
        > services, cutting of water supplies to those who cannot pay for it.
        > Companies are buying up large tracts of land in Africa where they can
        > secure large supplies of water for agriculture production. As
        > desertification spreads and water demands increase, Canada’s water
        > will draw a great deal of attention. Canada is already facing pressure
        > from the United Sates, to sell Canada’s water.
        > Our Water is not for Sale is an Alberta organization bringing together
        > a broad spectrum of citizens, politicians, social and environmental
        > NGOs, and organic farming groups. The organization was formed to stand
        > against water markets being created in Alberta. The organization
        > believes Alberta should implement a system based on needs, rather then
        > a system which gives the water to those who can pay the most for it.
        > Alberta is set to change its water laws from a First In Time First in
        > Right (FITFIR), to what many believe will be water markets throughout
        > Alberta. If Alberta does implement water markets, they will be the
        > first province in Canada to do so. According to the Council of
        > Canadians, recent reports by government appointed bodies, released by
        > the government, show they are almost exclusively focused on expanding
        > water markets. For their part, the Alberta Government denies they are
        > moving towards water markets.
        > Is Alberta facing a water crisis and on a larger scale is Canada? Some
        > Alberta communities such as Okotoks have had to limit their size,
        > because of water shortages. A large portion of Canada’s clean water is
        > not easily accessed, such as icebergs and glaciers.
        > Virtual Water exportation is the water used to grow crops, which are
        > then shipped outside of the region or country. Canada is a large
        > supplier of food crops to the rest of the world, making Canada a net
        > exporter of Virtual Water. Any type of bottled beverage exported
        > outside the country, is also the exportation of Virtual Water. Some
        > studies estimate that Canada is exporting Virtual Water at 60 billion
        > cubic meters per year, and rising.
        > The state of Vermont has a very different way of approaching water
        > issues, then most other developed areas. Vermont holds the water in
        > trust for the people of Vermont, the water is owned by the public,
        > there is no private ownership. Vermont has very progressive water use
        > laws. As Alberta moves towards a change in water laws, Albertan's will
        > face a choice. Should water markets be created in Alberta, similar to
        > those of Australia? Or should Alberta take the route of Vermont,
        > holding the water resources in trust for the people and the ecosystem?
        > As the demands for water increase, the fight over water rights will
        > increase. “These wars will not be fought on battle fields, but on the
        > floors of the worlds stock exchanges” Says Barlow. Pollution and
        > misuse of Canada’s water supplies, Virtual Water exportation, and an
        > ever-increasing demand by a growing public, are straining Alberta and
        > Canada’s water resources. If water markets are approved for use in
        > Alberta, it will set a precedent for the rest of Canada that our water
        > is for sale.
        >
        > http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/299489
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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