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RE: [energyresources] Re: Peak oil and the psychology of work

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  • Abernethy, Virginia Deane
    I m very glad you read it and liked it. Thanks. Virginia ________________________________ From: energyresources@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Helga V Sent: Wed
    Message 1 of 35 , Jan 1, 2010
      I'm very glad you read it and liked it. Thanks.
      Virginia

      ________________________________

      From: energyresources@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Helga V
      Sent: Wed 12/30/2009 2:15 PM
      To: energyresources@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [energyresources] Re: Peak oil and the psychology of work




      I downloaded your paper, Virginia. Nice work! regards, Helga

      --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com <mailto:energyresources%40yahoogroups.com> , "Abernethy, Virginia Deane" <virginia.abernethy@...> wrote:
      >
      > I suggest you read the article on this group of Eskimo. Inuit is too broad a category. I told you how to find the reference.
      > V.
      >
      > ________________________________
      >
      > From: energyresources@yahoogroups.com <mailto:energyresources%40yahoogroups.com> on behalf of Michael Lewis
      > Sent: Mon 12/28/2009 10:29 PM
      > To: energyresources@yahoogroups.com <mailto:energyresources%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: Re: [energyresources] Re: Peak oil and the psychology of work
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Abernethy, Virginia Deane wrote:
      > > More on Eskimo:
      > >
      >
      > Perhaps you are referring to Inuit.
      >
      > >
      > > The sled dog to human ratio was a proxy for community prosperity, or actually their margin of survival in a very tough environment.
      > >
      >
      > I doubt this simplistic model. It takes so many dogs to pull a sled,
      > and one can only feed so many sled dogs, so prosperity is not part of
      > this equation with Arctic peoples.
      >
      > >
      > > It's interesting that where the ratio was low, they almost certainly practiced female infanticide. That is a very efficient means for keeping population size in check because females are the "scarce resource" when it comes to mammalian reproduction.
      > >
      >
      > Female infanticide was a function of food availability, not sled
      > dogs (except when they became food!). It was indeed used, in extreme
      > situations, very rarely.
      >
      > >
      > > It's an interesting case study and the reference is in my first book on this subject: Population Pressure and Cultural Adjustment. The second book edition was put out by Transaction Publications.
      > >
      >
      > Which case study is this?
      >
      > Michael
      >
      > --
      > Hayduke Blogs
      > http://hayduke2000.blogspot.com/ <http://hayduke2000.blogspot.com/> <http://hayduke2000.blogspot.com/ <http://hayduke2000.blogspot.com/> >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Helga V
      I was not presenting a sentimentalized account, I was reporting what I observed among a group of people who at present share the planet with us. I certainly am
      Message 35 of 35 , Jan 1, 2010
        I was not presenting a sentimentalized account, I was reporting what I observed among a group of people who at present share the planet with us.

        I certainly am not a romantic and in my own work i also collected data on thefts and murders, heart break and disease.

        But I had the great fortune to live among one of the last groups of mobile hunter-gatherers on the planet, and I have a feeling that we will be their like again... or at least, those of us who survive the coming collapse.

        And, by the way, the Ibu are not hunter-gatherers. regards, Helga

        --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com, Marisa Cohen <edet@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am always amazed to read these sentimentalized versions of a bygone
        > era of hunter-gatherers and other cultures outside our western
        > pattern.
        > You may be interested to read the accounts of life in a small
        > village of the Ibu tribe, as described by the Nigerian writer Achebe
        > "Things fall apart", stories of children and especially twins,
        > killed on order by the goddess earth and other awful superstitions.
        > Besides, the wealth of a man is essential and commands respect-
        > equality is not a value. Women are definitely despised and the number
        > of wives is part of the enhanced status.
        >
        > Marisa
        >
        > On Dec 30, 2009, at 7:53 AM, Helga V wrote:
        >
        > > Actually, i would. They are sedentary hunter-gatherers, and possibly
        > > more like the pre-neolithic (mesolithic) cultures in the
        > > archaeological record. They have experienced some of the changes you
        > > also see in horticultural people, in that they had become organized
        > > as - somewhat - corporate groups - although they still had bilateral
        > > kinship, they had higher population density and some warfare or
        > > raiding.
        > >
        > > I suspect that any hunter-gatherer group that becomes sedentary will
        > > experience an shortening of the birth spacing, and therefore faster
        > > population growth, but it is hard to reconstruct in contexts like
        > > the Northwest Coast due to the rapid changes that occurred there
        > > after contact with Europeans.
        > >
        > > I note that in a later post it was mentioned that the Inuit rarely
        > > used infanticide. This fits with what I found in the Kalahari. I saw
        > > several sets of twin, and met one man who was born with both legs
        > > paralyzed - he carried his legs around in a sort of leather sling
        > > and walked on his hands. He ran a trap line, was an excellent
        > > marksman and hunter, and was married with four children.
        > >
        > > Added to this was the interview data on infanticide - people in this
        > > culture all expressed horror when I asked if a damaged child might
        > > ever be killed - they said this was wrong, and that all children
        > > born were guaranteed two things - their mother's milk and the love
        > > of all their relations. The love, incidentally, was created for each
        > > child individually and entered (pierced) the hearts of all family
        > > members as a love separate and special for that particular child, so
        > > that other siblings need not compete for the love of their parents.
        > >
        > > regards, Helga
        > >
        > > --- In energyresources@yahoogroups.com, Michael Lewis <hayduke@>
        > > wrote:
        > >
        > > > I wouldn't characterise Northwest Coast Native people as
        > > > hunter-gatherers. Would you, Helga?
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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