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Re: [empire-deluxe] Patch 3.512 (was: some Great Graphics)

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  • Michael Mendelsohn
    On 10 Sep 2003 , Steven Woodcock wrote about Re: [empire-deluxe] ... You already get a bad combat attackratio when you re attacking land units with aircraft
    Message 1 of 47 , Sep 10, 2003
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      On 10 Sep 2003 , Steven Woodcock wrote about Re: [empire-deluxe]
      Patch 3.512 (wa:
      > I think you're taking what I said out of context.
      >
      > I said the better general won't lose as many units, and I stand by
      > that.
      > If you are ruthlessly sacrificing your units into
      > out-of-range airplane attacks and futile attacks against battleships
      > you're not playing very well, frankly. Same goes if you let your
      > trannies get caught loaded a lot.

      You already get a bad combat attackratio when you're attacking land
      units with aircraft (exceptofr BO-AR, obviously), and that is exactly
      the kind of confrontation you could get into in the situation I
      described. I don't see how that makes one a bad general.

      > I think the better player balances his production efficiency with
      > his
      > unit production and unit loss--and that's what
      > the event organizer was trying to measure.

      That's not what you measure with # of units lost. This depends
      entirely on the random generator and the chances you have when
      entering combat - if you enter lots of combats with good odds (such
      as attacking TR), you'll lose less units as if you accept worse odds.


      Now I agree in the real world this is certainly the mark of a good
      general, but it doesn't necessarily help you win empire games if you
      already need to retire cities to keep up your prod. eff. If you have
      a choice of either not producing a unit, or producing a unit that
      comes up quickly to the the front and is lost quickly there, it makes
      sense to maybe produce fighters and smash them against enemy cities.
      It'll hurt the enemy more than producing nothing.

      What does count is repairing units, but I repair far less units than
      I lose, because I incur most losses on land units and aircraft, which
      can rarely be repaired, so repairing is not a big factor re: unit
      count.

      Cheers
      mendel


      > From: "Michael Mendelsohn" <yahoo@...>

      > Actually, that's not necessarily true, especially when playing at
      > Adv3. To avoid Efficiency degradation, you can either lay up a lot of
      > cities, or start producing units that don't spend so much time in
      > transit to the frontlines. In the latter case, destroying your own
      > units becomes imperative as not doing that will impair your efficiency
      > - you can either not have units by losing them in battle, or by not
      > producing them; and given these alternatives, there's not much of a
      > drawback accepting bad combat odds.

      --
      The beginning starts in the middle, and the end suddenly stops.
      "Der Anfang fängt in der Mitte an, und das Ende hört plötzlich auf."
      -- zitiert auf http://www.meocom-online.de/home/sabseb/zl.html
    • Andy Young
      I have been playing with different styles of maintaining production. I have tried keeping my production up by turning off production is backwater cities.
      Message 47 of 47 , Sep 15, 2003
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        I have been playing with different styles of maintaining production.

        I have tried keeping my production up by turning off production is
        backwater cities. Consider the situation.
        City Count 128, Units 451, Cities producing 37 [8+7+16+3+1+1+1],
        Overall Production Efficiency 379%
        By observation I see that I'm producing about 10 units per turn.

        Turning on the production in ten cities will increase the cities
        producing by 25% but will reduce overall production efficiency by
        only 15% to 323%. The result is a net increase in production of 10%.

        Turning on the production in all cities will increase the cities
        producing by 3.45 times but will reduce overall production efficiency
        by about 1/3 to 133%. The result is a net increase in production of
        20%.

        You can tweak this further.
        Turning the production to 100 cities will increase the cities
        producing to 2.7 times the original but will reduce overall
        production efficiency by about 1/2 to 174%. The result is a net
        increase in production of 24%.

        I applied these calculations to other games that I played and the
        results vary greatly. Sometimes you can maximumize production by
        keeping production at 400%, sometimes you need to turn all cities on.

        Conclusion:
        ED remains a great game with subtleties beyond comprehension.

        GeneralError
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