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brochure for tax mailing

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  • Bruce Crowder
    Hey folks. Here is the brochure I am planning to give the city to be included with the annual tax mailing. I need to give it to them tomorrow -- sorry for
    Message 1 of 8 , May 7 8:48 PM
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      Hey folks.  Here is the brochure I am planning to give the city to be included with the annual tax mailing.  I need to give it to them tomorrow -- sorry for the short notice, but I emailed the city today to check on the due date and they told me to get it in by tomorrow.   My fault for letting it sit for a while.

      Please read hese over and let me know if there are any egregious errors.  I have to turn it over in the morning, but there may be an opportunity for editing after they look it over (though I'm really not sure).

      I am going to ask for two sided copies full-sized 8.5 x 11.

      I am not a graphic designer and I threw it together in a pretty big hurry, so don't worry about hurting my feelings if you have any criticisms.

      --
      Bruce Crowder
      http://ctenergy.blogspot.com
    • david streever
      Hey Bruce, Bang up job. I think that s beautiful. You hit all the major points & I like the evenness of it. Great job man! David Streever 203/843.1866 _____
      Message 2 of 8 , May 8 3:46 AM
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        Hey Bruce,

         

        Bang up job. I think that’s beautiful. You hit all the major points & I like the evenness of it.

         

        Great job man!

         

        David Streever

        203/843.1866


        From: elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com [mailto:elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bruce Crowder
        Sent: Monday, May 07, 2007 23.49
        To: Elm CIty Cycling
        Cc: Edward Crowder; Roland Lemar
        Subject: [Elm City Cycling] brochure for tax mailing

         

        Hey folks.  Here is the brochure I am planning to give the city to be included with the annual tax mailing.  I need to give it to them tomorrow -- sorry for the short notice, but I emailed the city today to check on the due date and they told me to get it in by tomorrow.   My fault for letting it sit for a while.

        Please read hese over and let me know if there are any egregious errors.  I have to turn it over in the morning, but there may be an opportunity for editing after they look it over (though I'm really not sure).

        I am going to ask for two sided copies full-sized 8.5 x 11.

        I am not a graphic designer and I threw it together in a pretty big hurry, so don't worry about hurting my feelings if you have any criticisms.

        --
        Bruce Crowder
        http://ctenergy. blogspot. com

      • Melinda Tuhus
        Hi Bruce, Thanks so much for doing this! I think this could be an important step in changing the culture of driving/cycling in New Haven. I just have two
        Message 3 of 8 , May 8 5:00 AM
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          Hi Bruce,
               Thanks so much for doing this! I think this could be an important step in changing the culture of driving/cycling in New Haven.
               I just have two questions about the text:

          1. "When stopped at a light, move to the center of the lane in line with other vehicles so that cars cannot miss seeing you. " -- This issue came up re: Robin's accident and the subsequent letters to the independent.org.  I think it's unclear (in the law, and in your write-up) about what the cyclist should do when the light changes, if he/she is waiting in a line of vehicles -- you write in a later section that cyclists should be as far to the right as practicable but also should be prepared to "take the lane" when a street is too narrow to ride outside the line of motor traffic. So when a light changes, should a cyclist move immediately out of the lane of traffic?

          2. "For the safety of pedestrians, bicyclists may not ride on sidewalks in
          New Haven except where otherwise designated." Is there such a designation anywhere in the city? Someone mentioned that the city wouldn't prosecute cyclists for riding on sidewalks if the adjacent street is too dangerous (for fear of liability should an accident occur). For example, Whitney Avenue south of Edwards is incredibly dangerous -- it's narrow with a horrible road surface (esp. near the curbs). Meanwhile, a wide sidewalk parallels it and often has few pedestrians on it. Where should cyclists ride?

           Melinda


          Bruce Crowder wrote:

          Hey folks.  Here is the brochure I am planning to give the city to be included with the annual tax mailing.  I need to give it to them tomorrow -- sorry for the short notice, but I emailed the city today to check on the due date and they told me to get it in by tomorrow.   My fault for letting it sit for a while.

          Please read hese over and let me know if there are any egregious errors.  I have to turn it over in the morning, but there may be an opportunity for editing after they look it over (though I'm really not sure).

          I am going to ask for two sided copies full-sized 8.5 x 11.

          I am not a graphic designer and I threw it together in a pretty big hurry, so don't worry about hurting my feelings if you have any criticisms.

          --
          Bruce Crowder
          http://ctenergy. blogspot. com

        • david streever
          Hi Melinda and all Sidewalk riding has been a frequent topic lately. It IS illegal in New Haven. The state bicycle laws permit municipalities to enact sidewalk
          Message 4 of 8 , May 8 5:32 AM
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            Hi Melinda and all

             

            Sidewalk riding has been a frequent topic lately. It IS illegal in New Haven .

             

            The state bicycle laws permit municipalities to enact sidewalk bans, and the city of New Haven does have one in effect.

             

            Personally, I think the reason to ride on a sidewalk is simply convenience:

            In your case, I’d recommend NOT riding on that part of the street. It is dangerous. I go out of my way to avoid it—I have to ride over there frequently, and simply choose alternate roads.

             

            We have two different groups too: people like you who are concerned for your safety, and lazy people who don’t want to ride with traffic when they are downtown, and would rather take a sidewalk then loop around, as they should. I have sympathy for people who ride for safety, and a bit of scorn for the lazy.

             

            I think with those factors in mind, it’s important that we as an organization strongly advocate for cyclists to obey the law, and stay in the road. I think the practice we should strongly recommend though is one of alternate route planning, and simultaneously requesting help from the city.

             

            I do have a lot of sympathy for anyone who has to ride dangerous roads, Melinda, and don’t want this to sound like I’m criticizing you—you know I’m not, and have the utmost respect for you as a person and a cyclist!!! I’m just a bit frustrated by people I see bombing Orange & Elm sidewalks, oblivious to the pedestrians darting out of their way…..

             

             

            David Streever

            203/843.1866


            From: elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com [mailto:elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Melinda Tuhus
            Sent: Tuesday, May 08, 2007 8.00
            To: Bruce Crowder; Elm CIty Cycling
            Subject: Re: [Elm City Cycling] brochure for tax mailing

             

            Hi Bruce,
                 Thanks so much for doing this! I think this could be an important step in changing the culture of driving/cycling in New Haven .
                 I just have two questions about the text:

            1. "When stopped at a light, move to the center of the lane in line with other vehicles so that cars cannot miss seeing you. " -- This issue came up re: Robin's accident and the subsequent letters to the independent. org.
              I think it's unclear (in the law, and in your write-up) about what the cyclist should do when the light changes, if he/she is waiting in a line of vehicles -- you write in a later section that cyclists should be as far to the right as practicable but also should be prepared to "take the lane" when a street is too narrow to ride outside the line of motor traffic. So when a light changes, should a cyclist move immediately out of the lane of traffic?

            2. "For the safety of pedestrians, bicyclists may not ride on sidewalks in New Haven except where otherwise designated." Is there such a designation anywhere in the city? Someone mentioned that the city wouldn't prosecute cyclists for riding on sidewalks if the adjacent street is too dangerous (for fear of liability should an accident occur). For example, Whitney Avenue south of Edwards is incredibly dangerous -- it's narrow with a horrible road surface (esp. near the curbs). Meanwhile, a wide sidewalk parallels it and often has few pedestrians on it. Where should cyclists ride?

             Melinda

            Bruce Crowder wrote:

            Hey folks.  Here is the brochure I am planning to give the city to be included with the annual tax mailing.  I need to give it to them tomorrow -- sorry for the short notice, but I emailed the city today to check on the due date and they told me to get it in by tomorrow.   My fault for letting it sit for a while.

            Please read hese over and let me know if there are any egregious errors.  I have to turn it over in the morning, but there may be an opportunity for editing after they look it over (though I'm really not sure).

            I am going to ask for two sided copies full-sized 8.5 x 11.

            I am not a graphic designer and I threw it together in a pretty big hurry, so don't worry about hurting my feelings if you have any criticisms.

            --
            Bruce Crowder
            http://ctenergy. blogspot. com

          • Bruce Crowder
            Thank you so much for reviewing this. I read the bicyclesafe.org guidelines on not getting hit and while they have several options for staying safe at traffic
            Message 5 of 8 , May 8 5:55 AM
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              Thank you so much for reviewing this.  I read the bicyclesafe.org guidelines on not getting hit and while they have several options for staying safe at traffic lights, I couldn't fit them all in and this one seemed to be the most failsafe.  This is also the approach that I personally use.  I stay in the line of traffic until I'm through the intersection and then pull to the right if there's room.

              It's really hard to keep all these rules concise.  I'll cut out the center lane part and try to find room for a link to bicyclesafe.org.

              "When stopped at a light, position yourself so that you are clearly visible.  Be wary of vehicles that may decide to make a right turn. M ake eye contact with adjacent drivers and remember to smile."

              As far as riding on the sidewalk, I know that the vision trail where it runs around Ikea is a sidewalk with a set of signs and bricks down the middle designating bicycles on one side and pedestrians on the other.  The police went through a phase where they were ticketing kids for violating traffic laws on bicycles -- including riding on sidewalks -- I think this was in response to a series of crimes commited by kids on bicycles.  There are times when I ride on the sidewalk too (though very rarely), but I am aware that I'm breaking a law and that is a risk that I choose to take.  I think people should at least know that it's against the law.  I see a lot of bicyclists in new haven weaving dangerously around pedestrians on the sidewalks and that is a practice that has got to stop before someone gets seriously hurt.



              On 5/8/07, Melinda Tuhus <tuhus.dubrow@...> wrote:
              Hi Bruce,
                   Thanks so much for doing this! I think this could be an important step in changing the culture of driving/cycling in New Haven.
                   I just have two questions about the text:

              1. "When stopped at a light, move to the center of the lane in line with other vehicles so that cars cannot miss seeing you. " -- This issue came up re: Robin's accident and the subsequent letters to the independent.org.  I think it's unclear (in the law, and in your write-up) about what the cyclist should do when the light changes, if he/she is waiting in a line of vehicles -- you write in a later section that cyclists should be as far to the right as practicable but also should be prepared to "take the lane" when a street is too narrow to ride outside the line of motor traffic. So when a light changes, should a cyclist move immediately out of the lane of traffic?

              2. "For the safety of pedestrians, bicyclists may not ride on sidewalks in
              New Haven except where otherwise designated." Is there such a designation anywhere in the city? Someone mentioned that the city wouldn't prosecute cyclists for riding on sidewalks if the adjacent street is too dangerous (for fear of liability should an accident occur). For example, Whitney Avenue south of Edwards is incredibly dangerous -- it's narrow with a horrible road surface (esp. near the curbs). Meanwhile, a wide sidewalk parallels it and often has few pedestrians on it. Where should cyclists ride?

               Melinda


              Bruce Crowder wrote:

              Hey folks.  Here is the brochure I am planning to give the city to be included with the annual tax mailing.  I need to give it to them tomorrow -- sorry for the short notice, but I emailed the city today to check on the due date and they told me to get it in by tomorrow.   My fault for letting it sit for a while.

              Please read hese over and let me know if there are any egregious errors.  I have to turn it over in the morning, but there may be an opportunity for editing after they look it over (though I'm really not sure).

              I am going to ask for two sided copies full-sized 8.5 x 11.

              I am not a graphic designer and I threw it together in a pretty big hurry, so don't worry about hurting my feelings if you have any criticisms.

              --
              Bruce Crowder
              http://ctenergy.blogspot.com




              --
              Bruce Crowder
              http://ctenergy.blogspot.com
            • Kurtz,William
              The brochure looks great, Bruce; thanks for putting that together. There s no way to prepare for, or give rules for every eventuality. The emphasis should
              Message 6 of 8 , May 8 6:03 AM
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                The brochure looks great, Bruce; thanks for putting that together.

                 

                There’s no way to prepare for, or give rules for every eventuality.  The emphasis should always be on safety first, then following the applicable laws and rules.  I think we ought to encourage people to ride with traffic, signal their intentions, and be predictable and aware of their surroundings.  The fine points will take care of themselves—including the question of riding on the sidewalk.  I think we all do it at times but like Bruce said, we have to be aware that we’re technically violating the law and have a responsibility to be extra mindful of the safety of pedestrians.  Riding recklessly down the sidewalk is the cycling equivalent of those people who zoom down the highway, weaving in and out of traffic as though they’re pretending to be fighter pilots or something. 

              • Melinda Tuhus
                I second the point about riding predictably -- and the same goes for motor vehicles and pedestrians. Melinda
                Message 7 of 8 , May 8 7:03 AM
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                  I second the point about riding predictably -- and the same goes for motor vehicles and pedestrians.

                  Melinda

                  Kurtz,William wrote:

                  The brochure looks great, Bruce; thanks for putting that together.

                   

                  There’s no way to prepare for, or give rules for every eventuality.  The emphasis should always be on safety first, then following the applicable laws and rules.  I think we ought to encourage people to ride with traffic, signal their intentions, and be predictable and aware of their surroundings.  The fine points will take care of themselves—including the question of riding on the sidewalk.  I think we all do it at times but like Bruce said, we have to be aware that we’re technically violating the law and have a responsibility to be extra mindful of the safety of pedestrians.  Riding recklessly down the sidewalk is the cycling equivalent of those people who zoom down the highway, weaving in and out of traffic as though they’re pretending to be fighter pilots or something. 

                • Kurtz,William
                  Of course it does: the greater obligation is always on the person who has the greater capacity to do damage. Bike/car: the motorist needs to be extra
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 8 7:44 AM
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                    Of course it does:  the greater obligation is always on the person who has the greater capacity to do damage.  Bike/car: the motorist needs to be extra careful; bike/pedestrian, the cyclist needs to watch out.  I think that’s an attitude to cultivate.   

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