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Re: [Elm City Cycling] SWEET NEW BUS PLACARDS!

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  • bnt789
    Hey, [If you are a normal person, please ignore this email.] I just saw the 3-foot placard close up and noticed that it actually says 3-FEET. IT S NOT JUST A
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 1, 2009
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      Hey,

      [If you are a normal person, please ignore this email.]

      I just saw the 3-foot placard close up and noticed that it actually says "3-FEET. IT'S NOT JUST A CUSHION. IT'S A LAW." (I hadn't noticed the periods before). Therefore, I hereby upgrade my rating of CT DOT's punctuation use from "atrocious" to "debatable."

      I continue to dispute their usage of a hyphen in the expression "3-feet;" hyphens should be used when multiple non-modifiers (or a non-modifier and a modifier, as in the case of "non-modifier") are employed as a single modifier. Thus the expression 3-foot (as in "a 3-foot cushion") should employ a hyphen, while the expression "3 feet," where "3" is a quantity and "feet" refers to the unit of length equal to twelve inches, should not employ a hyphen, as it does not function as a modifier.

      Brian Tang

      --- In elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com, david bonan <bicyclereporter@...> wrote:
      >
      > i checked my email today on a bike trip in suffield about the bus placards.
      > then in east windsor, i saw the sign! it was cool.
      >
      > i don't understand what you meant about the punctuation.
      >
    • Sturgis-Pascale, Erin
      Brian, I m nominating you for King of the Universe ! Thanks for the laughs. Non-normally yours, Erin From: elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 1, 2009
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        Brian,

        I’m nominating you for “King of the Universe”!

         

        Thanks for the laughs.

         

        Non-normally yours,

        Erin

         

        From: elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com [mailto:elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of bnt789
        Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 11:11 AM
        To: elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Elm City Cycling] SWEET NEW BUS PLACARDS!

         

         

        Hey,

        [If you are a normal person, please ignore this email.]

        I just saw the 3-foot placard close up and noticed that it actually says "3-FEET. IT'S NOT JUST A CUSHION. IT'S A LAW." (I hadn't noticed the periods before). Therefore, I hereby upgrade my rating of CT DOT's punctuation use from "atrocious" to "debatable."

        I continue to dispute their usage of a hyphen in the expression "3-feet;" hyphens should be used when multiple non-modifiers (or a non-modifier and a modifier, as in the case of "non-modifier") are employed as a single modifier. Thus the expression 3-foot (as in "a 3-foot cushion") should employ a hyphen, while the expression "3 feet," where "3" is a quantity and "feet" refers to the unit of length equal to twelve inches, should not employ a hyphen, as it does not function as a modifier.

        Brian Tang

        --- In elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com, david bonan <bicyclereporter@...> wrote:

        >
        > i checked my email today on a bike trip in suffield about the bus
        placards.
        > then in east windsor, i saw the sign! it was cool.
        >
        > i don't understand what you meant about the punctuation.
        >

      • Nottoli, Timothy
        I suggest a rewording: 3 feet: if I can smack you with a yardstick, you re too close! I think it s great that they re posting the message on buses,
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 1, 2009
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          I suggest a rewording: "3 feet: if I can smack you with a yardstick, you're too close!"

          I think it's great that they're posting the message on buses, regardless of punctuation. It might be the only way that some people learn traffic laws.

          Tim


          On 10/1/09 11:10 AM, "bnt789" <bnt789@...> wrote:





          Hey,

          [If you are a normal person, please ignore this email.]

          I just saw the 3-foot placard close up and noticed that it actually says "3-FEET. IT'S NOT JUST A CUSHION. IT'S A LAW." (I hadn't noticed the periods before). Therefore, I hereby upgrade my rating of CT DOT's punctuation use from "atrocious" to "debatable."

          I continue to dispute their usage of a hyphen in the expression "3-feet;" hyphens should be used when multiple non-modifiers (or a non-modifier and a modifier, as in the case of "non-modifier") are employed as a single modifier. Thus the expression 3-foot (as in "a 3-foot cushion") should employ a hyphen, while the expression "3 feet," where "3" is a quantity and "feet" refers to the unit of length equal to twelve inches, should not employ a hyphen, as it does not function as a modifier.

          Brian Tang

          --- In elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com <mailto:elmcitycycling%40yahoogroups.com> , david bonan <bicyclereporter@...> wrote:
          >
          > i checked my email today on a bike trip in suffield about the bus placards.
          > then in east windsor, i saw the sign! it was cool.
          >
          > i don't understand what you meant about the punctuation.
          >
        • Linda Hoza
          Aha, a yardstick, that reminds me, I saw a contraption on a bike in Zurich that hung out to the side from the back of the bike delineating the footage that was
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 1, 2009
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            Aha, a yardstick, that reminds me, I saw a contraption on a bike in Zurich that hung out to the side from the back of the bike delineating the footage that was necessary to pass at a safe distance. It had some sort of blinking or sparkling thingy on the end to attract attention.  I keep an eye out whenever I’m there hoping to see one again and take a picture but have never spotted it again. It seemed a unique and inventive tool for road safety -- any inventive entrepreneurs out there?

             

            Linda Hoza

            Connecticut Forest & Park Association

            Coordinator, Merritt Parkway Trail Alliance

            203-355-0687

            203-504-2442 (F)

            203-685-1100 ( Mobile )

             


            From: elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com [mailto:elmcitycycling@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nottoli, Timothy
            Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 1:41 PM
            To: Elm City Cycling
            Subject: Re: [ Elm City Cycling] SWEET NEW BUS PLACARDS!

             

             

            I suggest a rewording: "3 feet: if I can smack you with a yardstick, you're too close!"

            I think it's great that they're posting the message on buses, regardless of punctuation. It might be the only way that some people learn traffic laws.

            Tim

            On 10/1/09 11:10 AM, "bnt789" <bnt789@gmail. com> wrote:

            Hey,

            [If you are a normal person, please ignore this email.]

            I just saw the 3-foot placard close up and noticed that it actually says "3-FEET. IT'S NOT JUST A CUSHION. IT'S A LAW." (I hadn't noticed the periods before). Therefore, I hereby upgrade my rating of CT DOT's punctuation use from "atrocious" to "debatable."

            I continue to dispute their usage of a hyphen in the expression "3-feet;" hyphens should be used when multiple non-modifiers (or a non-modifier and a modifier, as in the case of "non-modifier" ) are employed as a single modifier. Thus the expression 3-foot (as in "a 3-foot cushion") should employ a hyphen, while the expression "3 feet," where "3" is a quantity and "feet" refers to the unit of length equal to twelve inches, should not employ a hyphen, as it does not function as a modifier.

            Brian Tang

            --- In elmcitycycling@ yahoogroups. com <mailto:elmcitycycl ing%40yahoogroup s.com> , david bonan <bicyclereporter@ ...> wrote:

            >
            > i checked my email today on a bike trip in suffield about the bus
            placards.
            > then in east windsor ,
            i saw the sign! it was cool.
            >
            > i don't understand what you meant about the punctuation.
            >

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