Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [elfscript2] Re: on DTS 71 -- there is a new tengwa!

Expand Messages
  • Johan Winge
    ... I agree that the doubled understroke is most probably used to indicate that we are dealing with the noun Inn , rather than the conjunction ( Green Dragon
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 8, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      On Sun, 07 Oct 2007, Måns Bjorkman wrote:

      > On Wed, 26 Sep 2007, j_mach_wust wrote:
      >
      >> * The word "Inn" has a kind of doubled understroke that might have
      >> been used in order to differentiate it from the homophonous word "in"
      >> (both are spelt identically).
      >
      > Good point! Note also the similar tehta indicating double consonants
      > in DTS 50-51.

      I agree that the doubled understroke is most probably used to indicate
      that we are dealing with the noun "Inn", rather than the conjunction
      ("Green Dragon in Bywater"). The connection with the consonant doubler in
      DTS 50-51 would be indubitable, if it was placed below the númen. But
      since it is instead clearly positioned below the carrier, I would propose
      a slightly different explanation of this sign:

      As far as I can see, whenever there are any capital letters in the text as
      published in The Hobbit, these are represented in this specimen by tengwar
      with doubled telco. The only apparent exception to this is in this word.
      Thus my guess is that the double understroke works as a sort of
      capitalisation of the short carrier.

      -- Johan Winge
    • j_mach_wust
      ... Good point! Add to this that in DTS 71, short carrier represents /i/, while long carrier represents /e/, so it is not possible to embiggen the smallest
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 9, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In #168 of elfscript2@yahoogroups.com, Johan Winge wrote:

        > As far as I can see, whenever there are any capital letters in the
        > text as published in The Hobbit, these are represented in this
        > specimen by tengwar with doubled telco. The only apparent exception
        > to this is in this word.
        > Thus my guess is that the double understroke works as a sort of
        > capitalisation of the short carrier.

        Good point! Add to this that in DTS 71, short carrier represents /i/, while long carrier represents /e/, so it is not possible to embiggen the smallest carrier.

        It is an interesting feature of DTS 71 that capital letters seem to be used consistently. I'm not sure how much can be said about this with regard to other specimina. If I'm not mistaken, at least some other English texts show the same feature.

        --
        grüess
        mach
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.