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Re: : Used At All?

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  • DDanielA@webtv.net
    I would assume that it s used in the Sindarin words hwest (breeze), hwan= n (sponge) and hwinio (twirl). –Danny.
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 31, 2000
      I would assume that it's used in the Sindarin words "hwest" (breeze), "hwan=
      n" (sponge) and "hwinio" (twirl). –Danny.
      --- In elfscript@egroups.com, Mans Bjorkman <mansb@h...> wrote:
      > Near the bottom of the Tengwar table in Appendix E to _The Lord of the
      > Rings_, there is an odd-looking tengwa which resembles a "d" with a
      > tail. The text names it _hwesta sindarinwa_, "Grey-elven _hw_". The
      > tengwa was "mostly used (if at all) for voiceless _w_ (_hw_)".
      >
      > The name _hwesta sindarinwa_ would suggest that the tengwa was used when
      > writing Sindarin, yet we have no examples of its usage in that language.
      > In fact, in the whole of Tolkien's published production, a tengwa with
      > this appearance occurs in one place only: the Tengwar table in LR.
      > (Christopher Tolkien does use it in his title page inscription to _The
      > Silmarillion_, but that inscription contains so many oddities that it
      > cannot be trusted to correspond with JRRT's intentions.)
      >
      > On the other hand, another, quite similar tengwa occurs several times in
      > Tolkien's English inscriptions, right from the early _Tom Bombadil_
      > inscriptions (DTS* 17,18) down to the proposed dust-jacked design for
      > _The Two Towers_ (DTS 37). In the former, it mostly resembles a cursive
      > "2" or an upside-down <romen>; in the latter, it has taken the form of
      > an elegant cursive "L". Common for all these is the closed bow to the
      > left of the stem, and the "tail" to the right of it (in DTS 18 the bow
      > may be missing, but its relatedness with the corresponding tengwa in DTS
      > 17 cannot be doubted).
      >
      > These tengwar all represent the English voiceless "w", just as <hwesta
      > sindarinwa> is meant to. Could they actually be cursive forms of that
      > tengwa? We know that <romen> developed as a cursive variant of <óre>, so
      > this kind of variation is not unpreceded. Given the attested usage,
      > then, which form of the tengwa should be used? The cursive form, or the
      > "upright" one given in the Tengwar table?
      >
      >
      > * "DTS" in this letter refers to The Mellonath Daeron Index of Tengwar
      > Specimina <http://www.forodrim.org/daeron/mdtci.html>
      >
      >
      > --
      > Måns Björkman "Mun þu mik!
      > Störtloppsvägen 8, III Man þik.
      > SE-129 46 Hägersten Un þu mer!
      > Sweden An þer."
    • Mans Bjorkman
      ... I would assume the same. Yours, Måns -- Måns Björkman Mun þu mik! Störtloppsvägen 8, III
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 31, 2000
        Danny Andriës wrote:

        > I would assume that it's used in the Sindarin words "hwest" (breeze),
        > "hwann" (sponge) and "hwinio" (twirl). –Danny.

        I would assume the same.

        Yours,
        Måns


        --
        Måns Björkman "Mun þu mik!
        Störtloppsvägen 8, III Man þik.
        SE-129 46 Hägersten Un þu mer!
        Sweden An þer."
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