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Re: Corrected version of the Chinese tehtar mode

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  • hisilome
    ... ... syllable. ... syllable. ... a ... ... following ... [I have long wondered about one little problem . When using Tengwar to write Chinese,
    Message 1 of 23 , Feb 17, 2006
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      --- In elfscript@yahoogroups.com, "j_mach_wust" <machhezan@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >This is a corrected version of the Chinese mode I proposed
      >yesterday.


      <...>


      >
      > NOTES TO THE CONSONANTS
      >
      > (1): vala is only used when the <w> is the first sound of a
      syllable.
      > If it follows a consonant, then the <w> is represented by a modified
      > left-curl above that consonant. If it follows a vowel, then it's
      > written with an úre that bears that preceding vowel.
      >
      > (2): vilya is only used when the <y> is the first sound of a
      syllable.
      > If it follows a consonant, then the <y> is represented by two dots
      > below that consonant. If it follows a vowel, then it's written with
      a
      > yanta that bears that preceding vowel.


      <...>


      >
      > COMPLEX VOWELS AND Ü
      >
      > All complex vowels and ü are written by combinations of the
      following
      > kind:
      >
      > y/w/yw + vowel + y/w
      >
      > Like this:
      >
      > ua = w + a
      > uo = w + o
      > uai = w + a + y (2)
      > ao = a + w
      > iu = i + w
      > ou = o + w
      > iao = y + a + w (2)
      >
      > ia = y + a
      > ie = y + e
      > io = y + o
      > iao = y + a + w (2)
      > ai = a + y
      > ei = e + y
      > ui = u + y
      > uai = w + a + y
      >
      > ü = y + u
      > üe = yw + e


      [I have long wondered about one little "problem". When using Tengwar
      to write Chinese, I always spell complex vowels in accordance with
      your suggestions above, presuming that when you use "u" and "i" you
      imply that one should use the actual U/I tehta, but when you use "w"
      and "y", the modified left-curl or uure/two underdots or yanta are
      employed.

      This works perfectly fine in most cases, but I believe there are two
      ambiguous scenarios that involve the combinations "iu" and "ui",
      featuring _both_ "i/y" and "u/w".

      If I read your suggestions correctly, for "iu" you suggest "i + u",
      i.e. "I-tehta on top of uure". Thus, a word like "diu" would be
      spelt "ando + I-tehta on top of uure". Question: Wouldn't it also
      comply with your NOTES TO THE CONSONANTS ("If <y> follows a
      consonant...") to spell "ando with two under-dots and U-tehta on top"?

      Similarly, I gather you'd spell a word like "tui" as "tinco + U-tehta
      on top of yanta". In accordance with your rules ("If <w> follows a
      consonant..."), couldn't one also spell "tinco with modified left-
      curl and I-tehta on top" (however one would arrange them, from left
      to right or on top of each other)?

      In a nutshell, how did you decide in these two special cases that the
      first part of "iu" and "ui" should be represented with a tehta and
      the second element with a tengwa, instead of using combinations
      employing two diacritic signs? I mean, here two choices seem possible
      (unlike in cases like "ai", "ia", "ei", "ua", "ao [=au =aw]" etc,
      since for "a" or "e" one has no choice but to use the "normal" A-/E-
      tehta, and thus naturally resorts to the more "special" spellings
      for "i/y" or "u/o/w", no matter if they make up the first or second
      element).

      Hm, hope this question isn't too obtuse...or confusing...:)]

      Hisilome
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