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Re: Tengwar for other languages

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  • mach
    ... Do you mean a curl that looks similar to an inverted s-letter? I used to write a following _r_ with this tehta in a Spanish mode where each syllable was
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 10, 2003
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      Benct Philip Jonsson wrote:
      > I have tried to write Sanskrit in Tengwar,
      > using an appendage to the tinkoteema for the
      > retroflex stops -- ideally the rightmost
      > luuva should end in a tail like that of
      > Roomen,

      Do you mean a curl that looks similar to an inverted s-letter? I used to
      write a following _r_ with this tehta in a Spanish mode where each syllable
      was represented by one tengwa + tehtar (kind of a little game). I suppose
      you've chosen that tehta to show the phonetical similarity of the alveolars
      ("retroflex") to _r_, right?

      I've also found an old attempt of mine to represent Sanskrit with tengwar,
      but I couldn't decide whether I'd use a modified tincotéma (I just chose the
      point below like in Roman transcription) for the alveolars ("retroflex"), or
      whether I'd use calmatéma for the alveolars and a modified calmatéma (with
      the sign for following _y_) for the palatals. But I think your suggestion is
      better than both of mine.

      > but when writing in a Dan Smith
      > font one has to use the s-curl. BTW I
      > also use the caret tehta for vocalic .r,

      I used to write syllabic _r_ with a little rómen above (for the
      representation of my southern German dialect). I also used to have a
      v-shaped representation of a variant of _r_, but I used it was a variant of
      rómen in the same sence úre is a variant of vilya in the classical Quenya
      mode (again in that Spanish mode).

      > I also used Arda for the retroflex .s

      Very good suggestion!

      > I also once tried to squeeze Arabic into
      > the four-teemar grid, but this is only
      > feasible if one follows the Arabic tradition
      > of regarding Jym as the voiced counterpart
      > of Kaaf -- actually reasonable from the
      > POV of the Egyptian pronunciation of 'Gym',
      > and the emphatics as modifications
      > of the dentals. If you are interested I
      > can produce a readble table and upload it.

      Sure I'd be interested. I also once designed a mode for Arabian, and it also
      regards Jym as the voiced counterpart of Kaaf. See:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/elfscript/message/1501

      suilaid
      mach
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