Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Thanx Guys!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Expand Messages
  • kedarnath_r@rediffmail.com
    Kedar here again! I am amazed by your response and I have indeed found some useful links. Often in TLOR Tolkien uses words like nigh , ere , anon .These
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 24, 2001
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Kedar here again!
      I am amazed by your response and I have
      indeed found some useful links.
      Often in TLOR Tolkien uses words
      like "nigh" , "ere" , "anon" .These words
      I think were used in the Old English but
      I am not sure of their meaning.!
      Can anyone comment on this????

      Kedar
    • John Cowan
      ... Synonym for near . Originally, nigh mean near and near meant what is now nearer : it was an irregular comparative. ... Before. ... In the future,
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 24, 2001
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        kedarnath_r@... wrote:

        > Often in TLOR Tolkien uses words like "nigh"

        Synonym for "near". Originally, "nigh" mean "near" and "near"
        meant what is now "nearer": it was an irregular comparative.

        > "ere"

        Before.

        > "anon"

        In the future, anywhere from "immediately" to "soon".

        > These words I think were used in the Old English

        "Old English" in the technical sense ended in 1066.
        You mean "Early Modern English". All these terms
        were current in the 16th and the 17th century and
        were common in poetry right through the 19th.

        --
        Not to perambulate || John Cowan <jcowan@...>
        the corridors || http://www.reutershealth.com
        during the hours of repose || http://www.ccil.org/~cowan
        in the boots of ascension. \\ Sign in Austrian ski-resort hotel
      • Gildor Inglorion
        ... There is one site, which is an online Tolkien Encyclopedia, if not mistaken it s called Arda project. There is a section there with a list of all (hm..
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 24, 2001
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          > "Old English" in the technical sense ended in 1066.
          > You mean "Early Modern English". All these terms
          > were current in the 16th and the 17th century and
          > were common in poetry right through the 19th.

          There is one site, which is an online Tolkien
          Encyclopedia, if not mistaken it's called Arda
          project. There is a section there with a list of all
          (hm.. many) archaic words that Tolkien uses and their
          meaning.. unfortunately I dont have the link right
          now.. if anyone has??

          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail
          http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/
        • David Nowakowski
          ... It s called the Encyclopedia of Arda, and is located at this URL: http://www.glyphweb.com/arda/ The link to the list of archaic words is in the bar to the
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 24, 2001
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            >There is one site, which is an online Tolkien
            >Encyclopedia, if not mistaken it's called Arda
            >project. There is a section there with a list of all
            >(hm.. many) archaic words that Tolkien uses and their
            >meaning.. unfortunately I dont have the link right
            >now.. if anyone has??

            It's called the Encyclopedia of Arda, and is located at this URL:

            http://www.glyphweb.com/arda/

            The link to the list of archaic words is in the bar to the left.


            Cuio mae,
            David Nowakowski

            _________________________________________________________________
            Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
          • Lola Lee
            ... You can also look these word up in a dictionary. A good dictionary will often have information on the background of certain words. I would recommend
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 27, 2001
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In elfscript@y..., kedarnath_r@r... wrote:


              > Often in TLOR Tolkien uses words
              > like "nigh" , "ere" , "anon" .These words
              > I think were used in the Old English but
              > I am not sure of their meaning.!
              > Can anyone comment on this????


              You can also look these word up in a dictionary. A good dictionary
              will often have information on the background of certain words. I
              would recommend Webster or Oxford. Get one that is on a college level
              - the definitions are more detailed. Whenever I come across an
              unfamiliar word, I make it a practice to look it up in a dictionary.
              You'll find that it can be your best friend!

              Lola
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.