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Re: Finnish with Beleriandic luuvar meanings?

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  • xeeniseit
    Harri Perälä teithant: a mode where voiced consonants cannot be represented would create an image of an uneducated, rustic writerI wrote:
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 6, 2003
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      Harri Perälä teithant:
      > > > a mode where voiced consonants cannot be represented would create
      an image of an uneducated, rustic writer

      I wrote:
      > > Uneducated? Rustic? If the mode fits the language it's designed for, th=
      en I
      don't understand these harsh judgments.

      Harri Perälä wrote:
      > Oh, I was just thinking about the current situation with Finnish and the =
      Latin
      alphabet. The letters b and g appear in loan words, and although they are
      often pronounced exactly like p and k, the written form is in some sense
      perceived as the correct one. Replacing b with p and g with k in writing
      creates a comical effect, perhaps something like what you get by writing
      "jools" instead of "jewels" in English.

      In my language it's different, because we use the d/b/g-letters to write th=
      e
      (short) t/p/k-sounds. So people are _not aware_ that in foreign words or
      names, they're saying t/p/k instead of d/b/g (of course, native speakers of=

      these foreign languages note that replacement). I was even told that people=

      (who speak my language) had perceived t/p/k-sounds spoken by Finns as if it=

      were d/b/g-sounds. This again shows that the sounds we think of as being d/=

      b/g-sounds (because we always write them as such) are in fact t/p/k-sounds.=


      So in that psychological respect, my language seems to be more suited for
      the use of these 'Beleriandic luuvar meanings' than Finnish (or Quechua).

      suilaid
      xeeniseit
    • John Cowan
      ... What language is that? Sounds like Chinese. -- With techies, I ve generally found John Cowan If your arguments lose the first round
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 6, 2003
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        xeeniseit scripsit:

        > In my language it's different, because we use the d/b/g-letters to write the
        > (short) t/p/k-sounds.

        What language is that? Sounds like Chinese.

        --
        With techies, I've generally found John Cowan
        If your arguments lose the first round http://www.reutershealth.com
        Make it rhyme, make it scan http://www.ccil.org/~cowan
        Then you generally can jcowan@...
        Make the same stupid point seem profound! --Jonathan Robie
      • xeeniseit
        ... d/b/g-letters to write the (short) t/p/k-sounds. ... It s a southern German dialect. I didn t know that our orthography is sharing some features with
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 7, 2003
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          I wrote:
          > > In my language it's different, because we use the
          d/b/g-letters to write the (short) t/p/k-sounds.

          John Cowan wrote:
          > What language is that? Sounds like Chinese.

          It's a southern German dialect. I didn't know that our orthography
          is sharing some features with Chinese transcription systems!

          suilaid
          xeeniseit
        • John Cowan
          ... Absolutely. The b in Beijing, for instance, represents an unvoiced sound; p is the same sound but with following aspiration, essentially an h . Some
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 7, 2003
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            xeeniseit scripsit:

            > It's a southern German dialect. I didn't know that our orthography
            > is sharing some features with Chinese transcription systems!

            Absolutely. The "b" in Beijing, for instance, represents an unvoiced
            sound; "p" is the same sound but with following aspiration, essentially
            an "h". Some dialects of English are pronounced this way as well, notably
            Australian.

            --
            John Cowan http://www.ccil.org/~cowan cowan@...
            To say that Bilbo's breath was taken away is no description at all. There
            are no words left to express his staggerment, since Men changed the language
            that they learned of elves in the days when all the world was wonderful.
            --_The Hobbit_
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