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Re: anna-yanta, vala-uure

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  • xeeniseit
    ... And exactly that s what I don t understand, as there is no reason at all to have different signs for consonantal w / y and for the same sound as the
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 21, 2002
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      Danny teithant:

      >Teithant Alf:
      >
      >>I'm sorry I've confused things. I'm not talking about
      >>the Quenya mode, but rather about the Westron/English
      >>/Black Speech mode. This mode/these modes happen
      >>to have -in their tehtar version- to have two signs for
      >>the sound w and two for the sound of (consonantal) y
      >>(as in _yes_), but I don't find any good reason for that.
      >
      >Actually, that's not the case. From the examples we
      >have, tehta modes that use vala for consonantal 'w' and
      >anna for consonantal 'y' use ├║re and yanta as second
      >elements of diphthongs, not as consonants.

      And exactly that's what I don't understand, as there is no reason at
      all to have different signs for consonantal 'w'/'y' and for the same
      sound as the second part of a diphtong. You can observe the same thing
      even in traditional English orthography, where you also have the
      "consonantal" letters <w> and <y> for the second parts of diphtongs, in
      words such as _boy_ or _how_. The sounds of 'w' and 'y' are always the
      same; it's only a matter of interpretation whether you consider them
      "consonatal" or "second part of a diphtong". You could argue that
      English or Westron modes do exactly that interpretation, but I can see
      no reason for it in oomatehtar modes. In an oomatehtar mode with that
      interpretation, I would rather expect to find second parts of diphtongs
      represented with tehtar, not with tengwar, because in these modes any
      tengwa is "consonantal".

      suilaid, alf
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