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English, in tengwar.

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  • Eko-mane
    Okay, first of all, I just joined. Hi! ^_~ Second of all, I realize there s most likely a post/thread on this topic somewhere, but I also realize that this is
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 12, 2002
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      Okay, first of all, I just joined. Hi! ^_~

      Second of all, I realize there's most likely a post/thread on this
      topic somewhere, but I also realize that this is a very active group.
      I didn't find anything to help me, obviously, but I apologise if it's
      there, and I just missed it. ^_^;

      In any case, I've got the basic concept of the tengwar and tehtar. I
      use TengScribe (because I'm lazy) and its English mode (puts the
      tehta over the following consonant/cluster). Besides, that's how I've
      always learned it.

      Anyways, I acknowledge that each vowel has a set sound, and,
      accordingly, I write phoenetically rather than literally. However...
      as English is a very erratic language, there are some vowel sounds
      that don't seem to be represented. (I say seem, because either I or
      Dan Smith may be wrong) These are- "uh" (as in "Love"
      and "Stuff") / "ih" (as in "if" and "kill")


      So, to my question, can these be represented using the tengwar
      alphabet? If so, how, and if not, what is the suggested substitute?

      Thanks, everyone, I appreciate the help and await a response. ^_^
    • Young Power
      Hi all. First post for me too, but when I write English using tengwar, I tend towards assigning the following values: Vowel Symbol Short Sound Long
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 12, 2002
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        Hi all. First post for me too, but when I write English using tengwar, I tend towards assigning the following values:
        "Vowel Symbol" Short Sound Long Sound
        a Cat Father
        e slept Slate (what in English would be long A)
        also use for schwa sound
        and hidden e's
        i Fit Feet
        o Hoe Bought
        u But Hoot

        There are some overlaps in sound sometime, and sometimes the English spelling enshrined in my head takes over. A good intermediary for putting stuff into tengwar would be to look it up in a dictionary that uses the international phoenetic alphabet and transcribe from that.

        Eko-mane wrote:Okay, first of all, I just joined. Hi! ^_~

        Second of all, I realize there's most likely a post/thread on this
        topic somewhere, but I also realize that this is a very active group.
        I didn't find anything to help me, obviously, but I apologise if it's
        there, and I just missed it. ^_^;

        In any case, I've got the basic concept of the tengwar and tehtar. I
        use TengScribe (because I'm lazy) and its English mode (puts the
        tehta over the following consonant/cluster). Besides, that's how I've
        always learned it.

        Anyways, I acknowledge that each vowel has a set sound, and,
        accordingly, I write phoenetically rather than literally. However...
        as English is a very erratic language, there are some vowel sounds
        that don't seem to be represented. (I say seem, because either I or
        Dan Smith may be wrong) These are- "uh" (as in "Love"
        and "Stuff") / "ih" (as in "if" and "kill")


        So, to my question, can these be represented using the tengwar
        alphabet? If so, how, and if not, what is the suggested substitute?

        Thanks, everyone, I appreciate the help and await a response. ^_^



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