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Re: Taliska

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  • jonathan_avidan
    Well, Taliska, by name, testimony and few samples is slightly (or heavily?) Gothic based. In WJ:238, 270, 309 we find _hal_ head, chief , _halbar_
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 26 1:04 PM
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      Well, Taliska, by name, testimony and few samples is slightly (or
      heavily?) Gothic based. In WJ:238, 270, 309 we find _hal_ "head,
      chief", _halbar_ "chieftain", _hal(a)_ "watch, guard",
      _halad_ "warden", _haldad_ "watchdog" and _bor_ "stone". In the
      Silmarillion, chp. 17, it is said that Beor's people (the speakers
      of Taliska) called him _Nóm_, "wisdom" and his people _Nómin_, "the
      wise". Helge concludes this might be the plural ending seen in
      various tongues of various stages by Tolkien, like Doriathrin,
      Ilkorin, Gnomish (btw, in Hebrew is beautifully called _Lilanith_
      which actually resembles the language itself!) and Rohirric (Helge
      mentioned only Dor. and Rohirric). However, this seems to be a
      simple adjectival ending by gloss and context. People are not
      called "wisdoms", yet "wise" can be used as a noun.

      Happy Israeli Independance Day!
      Khag shameakh,
      Jonathan Avidan.

      "falmarendur" <falmarendur@y...> wrote:
      > And is it possible, if copyright permits it, to know how it looks
      > like, any word or phrase?
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