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(Fwd) [coinherence-l] What did CW, Tolkien, CSL, make of life?

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  • Steve Hayes
    I ve forwarded this from the Charles Williams forum since it concerns all the Inklings. Comments, anyone? ... To: coinherence-l@egroups.com
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 9, 2008
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      I've forwarded this from the Charles Williams forum since it concerns all the
      Inklings.

      Comments, anyone?

      ------- Forwarded message follows -------
      To: "coinherence-l@egroups.com" <coinherence-l@yahoogroups.com>
      From: AJA <ahnemann@...>
      Date sent: Sat, 09 Aug 2008 14:05:07 -0400
      Subject: [coinherence-l] What did CW, Tolkien, CSL, make of life?
      Send reply to: coinherence-l@yahoogroups.com

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      I've again looked up and read Richard Sturch's article, 'Common Themes Among
      Inklings', Charles Williams: A celebrations, ed. Brian Horne, 1995. Thanks,
      Richard!! (Get this book, all!) My question in light of our sehnsucht
      discussion is, What did the Inklings think of life, and life's aesthetic?
      You
      must know that for centuries the church has been and still is struggling with
      this now- considering 'veil of tears' teaching about this life, and preaching
      longing for death and eternity in God's presence vs. the affirmation of the
      great aesthetic of life. Noted, at least in my church experience, that we're
      hearing more and more "For the beauty of this earth" praise and celebration.
      Certainly Williams spoke of the salutary beauty of love on this earth. Lewis
      loved his nature walks, his libations, his books and his friends. Tolkien?
      Their characters learn about cosmic things through life experience, no? But
      for them, is beauty on earth something cherished or fraught with the
      oppression of evil? So which way does the balance swing with these Inklings?
      Life? Death and Paradise? Or both in some way? How? And is what they wrote
      and thought still relevant (I'd say yes, of course). More to the question,
      is
      what they wrote life affirming?

      AJA



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      Steve Hayes
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    • ddanehyoakes
      ... I think these Inklings would not have agreed 100% on your questions, but that they would all agree to the following statement: Life is a good thing,
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 10, 2008
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        --- In eldil@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hayes" <hayesstw@...> wrote:
        > ...
        > for them, is beauty on earth something cherished or fraught with the
        > oppression of evil? So which way does the balance swing with these
        > Inklings? Life? Death and Paradise? Or both in some way? How?
        > And is what they wrote and thought still relevant (I'd say yes, of
        > course). More to the question, is what they wrote life affirming?

        I think these Inklings would not have agreed 100% on your
        questions, but that they would all agree to the following
        statement: Life is a good thing, created by God for us to
        enjoy; however, it is not the ultimate good, but rather
        a preview of the ultimate good. Further, it is (unlike the
        ultimate good) damaged or tainted by evil. Nonetheless, it
        is salutary to enjoy those aspects of this life which may
        be enjoyed lawfully.

        To borrow a bit of CW's terminology, I believe that all
        three of these Inklings were followers, to greater or
        lesser extents, of the Way of Affirmation -- this is
        Thou (though neither is this _fully_ Thou).

        And, yes, what they wrote is life-affirming, Williams'
        work most of all.

        --Dan'l
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