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Re: [eldil] 2012 reading

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  • Isaac
    Gosh, that s a lot of reading. 2012 was a busy year for me and I managed to squeeze only a few books in: MacDonald, George. Phantastes MacDonald, George.
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 2, 2013
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      Gosh, that's a lot of reading. 2012 was a busy year for me and I managed to squeeze only a few books in:

      MacDonald, George. Phantastes
      MacDonald, George. Lilith
      Lossky, Vladimir. The mystical theology of the Eastern Church
      Heschel, Abraham. The sabbath

      Maybe one or two others. Lossky was brilliant and Heschel's claim that Judaism is a religion of time (and not space) was intriguing.

      Isaac


      On 1 Jan 2013, at 12:03, Steve Hayes <hayesstw@...> wrote:

      > What did you read in 2012?
      >
      > When I look at the list of books I have read, it's a bit disappointing. I
      > didn't read as much as I hoped to, and there's not much by the Inklings there
      > either. Well, actually there's nothing there by or about the Inklings, though
      > I have a few on my "to read" list. The closest I came was Phil Rickman, whose
      > earlier books had a vaguely Charles Williamsish feel, but his more recent
      > offerings seem to be run-of-the-mill whodunits with a middle-aged Anglican
      > lady vicar with a teenage daughter in the role of Miss Marples. Pleasant
      > reading, but they somehow don't live up to the promise.
      >
      > Barbery, Muriel. 2008. The elegance of the hedgehog.
      > Boyne, John. 2012. The Absolutist.
      > Collins, Suzanne. 2009. Catching fire.
      > Collins, Suzanne. 2009. The hunger games.
      > Collins, Suzanne. 2010. Mockingjay.
      > Conrad, Joseph. 2010. Heart of darkness.
      > Crystal, David. 2007. By hook or by crook: a journey in search of English.
      > Davies, John D. 1983. The faith abroad.
      > Foer, Jonathan Safran. 2011 [2006] Extremely loud & incredibly close.
      > Forest, Jim. 2011. All is grace: a biography of Dorothy Day.
      > Goddard, Robert. 2012. Fault line.
      > James, P.D. 2011. Death comes to Pemberley.
      > Kerouac, Jack. 1963. Big Sur.
      > La Plante, Lynda. 2011. Blind fury.
      > Larsen, Reif. 2009. The selected works of T.S. Spivet.
      > Lelic, Simon. 2011. The facility.
      > Maher, Paul. 2007. Jack Kerouac's American journey.
      > Mankell, Henning. 2009. The fifth woman.
      > Mankell, Henning. 2010. The man from Beijing.
      > Mankell, Henning. 2011. The troubled man.
      > Maugham, W. Somerset. 1967 [1897] Liza of Lambeth.
      > Maugham, W. Somerset. 1967 [1953] Up at the villa.
      > Maugham, W. Somerset. 1970 [1930] Cakes and ale.
      > Nesbo, Jo. 2012 [1997] The bat.
      > Nesser, Hakan. 2012. Hour of the wolf.
      > Rickman, Phil. 2011. The secrets of pain.
      > Robinson, Peter. 2002. Aftermath.
      > Robinson, Peter. 2010. The price of love.
      > Sandison, David; Vickers, Graham. 2006. Neal Cassady: the fast life of a
      > Beat hero.
      > Shephard, Ben. 2010. The long road home: the aftermath of the Second World
      > War.
      > Tsiolkas, Christos. 2011. The slap.
      > Vermeulen, Elizabeth. 1961. Re‰nboog in die skemering.
      > Vermeulen, Elizabeth. s.a. Fata Morgana.
      > Vermeulen, Elizabeth. s.a. Towergoud.
      > Wise, Arthur. 1969. The day the Queen flew to Scotland for the grouse
      > shooting: a document.
      > Wouk, Herman. 1989. The winds of war.
      > Zaf¢n, Carlos Ruiz. 2005 [2002] The shadow of the wind.
      >
      > Some of those were re-reads - Kerouac, Wise and Wouk, Oh yes, and I also
      > reread "Pride and prejudice", but seem to have forgotten to record it.
      >
      > Best fiction? - "The elegance of the hedgehog", without a doubt. "The shadow
      > of the wind" was also pretty good.
      >
      > Best non-fiction? - Jim Forest's revised and revamped biography of Dorothy
      > Day, "All is grace". Strongly recommended.
    • Steve Hayes
      ... I read Lossky a long time ago, and tried to read Lilith, but never managed to finish it. I m not sure why. I read about three quarters of the way through
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 2, 2013
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        On 2 Jan 2013 at 12:58, Isaac wrote:

        > Gosh, that's a lot of reading. 2012 was a busy year for me and I managed to
        > squeeze only a few books in:
        >
        > MacDonald, George. Phantastes
        > MacDonald, George. Lilith
        > Lossky, Vladimir. The mystical theology of the Eastern Church
        > Heschel, Abraham. The sabbath
        >
        > Maybe one or two others. Lossky was brilliant and Heschel's claim that Judaism
        > is a religion of time (and not space) was intriguing.

        I read Lossky a long time ago, and tried to read Lilith, but never managed to
        finish it. I'm not sure why. I read about three quarters of the way through
        the first time, and about halfway through the second time.

        One phrase struck me qas memorable, though -- pity has, but is not love.




        --
        Steve Hayes
        E-mail: shayes@...
        Web: http://hayesstw.tumblr.com/ (follow me on Tumblr)
        Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
        Phone: 083-342-3563 or 012-333-6727
        Fax: 086-548-2525
      • Andrea Luxenburg
        I am writing - will be writing - an essay on virtue and heroism in Beowulf, working from an academic definition of hero/heroism. Any definitions you can think
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 1 12:06 PM
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          I am writing - will be writing - an essay on virtue and heroism in Beowulf, working from an academic definition of hero/heroism.  Any definitions you can think of from Tolkien or Lewis?  Of course, Chesterton or MacDonald would also work.  I might even consider Augustine or Boethius, if I don't have to read the entire collection to find the definition. (Not that I don't want to, but there are limits on my time.)
           
          Thanks for any suggestions.
           
          Andromeda
        • dnrlsa@...
          Try Tolkien s seminal essay “The monsters & the critics” available in pdf from a couple of places on the Web. Also the opposite of virtue is sin so see if
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 1 1:29 PM
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            Try Tolkien's seminal essay “The monsters & the critics” available in pdf from a couple of places on the Web.

            Also the opposite of virtue is sin so see if you can get hold of Morton W Bloomfield's tome on the Seven Deadly Sins.

            Good luck. It could be an interesting and rich topic.

            David Levey
            Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device
          • Steve Hayes
            ... What is the academic definition of heroism you are working from? I may be wrong, but I think that in Christian theology there is an ambivalence about both
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 6 5:51 PM
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              On 1 Apr 2013 at 12:06, Andrea Luxenburg wrote:

              > I am writing - will be writing - an essay on virtue and heroism in Beowulf,
              > working from an academic definition of hero/heroism. Any definitions you can
              > think of from Tolkien or Lewis? Of course, Chesterton or MacDonald would also
              > work. I might even consider Augustine or Boethius, if I don't have to read
              > the entire collection to find the definition. (Not that I don't want to, but
              > there are limits on my time.)

              What is the academic definition of heroism you are working from?

              I may be wrong, but I think that in Christian theology there is an
              ambivalence about both heroism and virtue, and, though I haven't studied
              Beowulf closely (and haven't read it for a long time) I suspect that in it
              the pagan notion of the virtue of herosim has been somewhat undermined by the
              Christian notions of mercy, compassion and love.

              This is seen in Tolkien too, for example in the well-known passage in the
              Lord of the Rings where Frodo says that it is a pity that Bilbo did not kill
              Gollum when he had the chance, and Gandalf remarks that it was pity that
              stayed his hand. And then there is George MacDonald saying (in "Lilith", I
              think), that pity has, but is not love.

              Is it only Christian writers who think that herosim should be tempered by
              mercy? It is it something inherent in the concept of heroism itself?


              --
              Steve Hayes
              E-mail: shayes@...
              Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
              Phone: 083-342-3563 or 012-333-6727
              Fax: 086-548-2525
            • Andrea Luxenburg
              What is the academic definition of heroism you are working from? ****That s just it - I need to find one to use. I may be wrong, but I think that in Christian
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 9 2:22 PM
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                What is the academic definition of heroism you are working from?
                 
                ****That's just it - I need to find one to use.

                I may be wrong, but I think that in Christian theology there is an
                ambivalence about both heroism and virtue, and, though I haven't studied
                Beowulf closely (and haven't read it for a long time) I suspect that in it
                the pagan notion of the virtue of herosim has been somewhat undermined by the
                Christian notions of mercy, compassion and love.

                ****I'm not sure what you mean by an ambivalence about virtue - I thought we were all in favor of it?
                 
                *I also see in Beowulf a tension between the pagan ideals and the Christian virtues, and that is part of what I want to explore. 
                 
                Is it only Christian writers who think that herosim should be tempered by
                mercy? It is it something inherent in the concept of heroism itself?

                ****Good question.  What about in the Iliad, when just about everyone seemed to think Achilles should have pity on Hector's family and return his corpse to them?  I think even in pagan heroism there is an element of noblesse oblige, that because I am strong and brave I should show mercy...but I'm not altogether sure how prominent that idea is.
                 
                Thanks for your input, Steven.  It is always helpful to hear other people's points of view.
                 
                Andromeda
              • Steve Hayes
                ... To quote a Western hymn (from a somewhat rusty memory, haven t sung it for 25 years or more): These keep the guard amid Salem s dear bowers Thrones,
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 9 8:56 PM
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                  On 9 Apr 2013 at 14:22, Andrea Luxenburg wrote:

                  > What is the academic definition of heroism you are working from?
                  >
                  > ****That's just it - I need to find one to use.
                  >
                  > I may be wrong, but I think that in Christian theology there is an
                  > ambivalence about both heroism and virtue, and, though I haven't studied
                  > Beowulf closely (and haven't read it for a long time) I suspect that in it the
                  > pagan notion of the virtue of herosim has been somewhat undermined by the
                  > Christian notions of mercy, compassion and love.
                  >
                  > ****I'm not sure what you mean by an ambivalence about virtue - I thought we
                  > were all in favor of it?

                  To quote a Western hymn (from a somewhat rusty memory, haven't sung it for 25
                  years or more):

                  These keep the guard amid Salem's dear bowers
                  Thrones, principalities, virtues and powers

                  I just checked the "Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church", but they just
                  have "See Cardinal Virtues" and "See Theological Virtues" which isn't very
                  helpful, so here are a few random and half-baked thoughts that you may or may
                  not want to pick up and bake.

                  Virtue suggests manliness, a peculiarly male characteristic, perhaps related
                  to machismo, and thus perhaps to Teutonic notions of heroism.

                  I am reminded of a poem I once learned in primary school, though it was about
                  Celtic heroism rather than Germanic, and also seen in Victorian retrospect.

                  The War-song of Dinas Vawr
                  By Thomas Love Peacock

                  The mountain sheep are sweeter,
                  But the valley sheep are fatter;
                  We therefore deemed it meeter
                  To carry off the latter.
                  We made an expedition;
                  We met a host, and quelled it;
                  We forced a strong position,
                  And killed the men who held it.

                  On Dyfed's richest valley,
                  Where herds of kine were browsing,
                  We made a mighty sally,
                  To furnish our carousing.
                  Fierce warriors rushed to meet us;
                  We met them, and o'erthrew them:
                  They struggled hard to beat us;
                  But we conquered them, and slew them.

                  As we drove our prize at leisure,
                  The king marched forth to catch us:
                  His rage surpassed all measure,
                  But his people could not match us.
                  He fled to his hall-pillars;
                  And, ere our force we led off,
                  Some sacked his house and cellars,
                  While others cut his head off.

                  We there, in strife bewild'ring,
                  Spilt blood enough to swim in:
                  We orphaned many children,
                  And widowed many women.
                  The eagles and the ravens
                  We glutted with our foemen;
                  The heroes and the cravens,
                  The spearmen and the bowmen.

                  We brought away from battle,
                  And much their land bemoaned them,
                  Two thousand head of cattle,
                  And the head of him who owned them:
                  Ednyfed, king of Dyfed,
                  His head was borne before us;
                  His wine and beasts supplied our feasts,
                  And his overthrow, our chorus.

                  That, I suspect, reflects the pagan notion of heroic virtue, or virtuous
                  heroism, untempered by any Christian notions of mercy.

                  In effect, it is a glorification of armed robbery, which, in the eyes of the
                  narrator of the poem at least, is virtuous.

                  If one considers "the Dionysian nine" (cf Williams's "The place of the lion")
                  I think virtue corresponds to exousia, the authority with which Jesus spoke,
                  and not as the scribes. In Romans 13:1 St Paul says "Let every soul be
                  subject to the superior virtues", yet in Ephesians 6:12 he refers to virtues
                  as spiritual powers of wickedness in the heavenlies, against which Christians
                  struggle.

                  So I would say "virtue" is ambivalent, at least from a Christian point of
                  view.


                  --
                  Steve Hayes
                  E-mail: shayes@...
                  Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
                  Phone: 083-342-3563 or 012-333-6727
                  Fax: 086-548-2525
                • Dan Drake
                  ... It s useful to be reminded of that poem, which I have always found loathsome since I first heard any of it beyond the first two lines, with their clever,
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 10 10:44 AM
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                    On Apr 9, 2013, at 8:56 PM, Steve Hayes wrote:

                    > That, I suspect, reflects the pagan notion of heroic virtue, or virtuous
                    > heroism, untempered by any Christian notions of mercy.
                    >
                    > In effect, it is a glorification of armed robbery, which, in the eyes of the
                    > narrator of the poem at least, is virtuous.

                    It's useful to be reminded of that poem, which I have always found loathsome since I first heard any of it beyond the first two lines, with their clever, jolly-rogue quality. ("What? The guy is SERIOUS?" Sheeesh!" IMHO.)

                    But there seems to be another thread to this matter, which hasn't been touched on. It's an account that I picked up a number of years ago, from a couple of sources, though I can't recall which, and it also seems to be just in the air to some extent.

                    In this account the whole Chivalric Ideal is a more or less conscious attempt to get at the ruffians, bold in battle and highly skilled, who dominated Europe in the early Middle Ages, and civilize them by imbuing them with Christian virtue. If this is accurate, the effort certainly succeeded on a literary level, and probably on a practical one as well. As to at least the part of the ideal that constituted romanic love, I recall something of the sort from C. S. Lewis; but I don't remember whether he said much of the matter of valor, which concerns us here.

                    Am I missing the obvious, or stating the too obvious, or maybe both?


                    --
                    Dan Drake
                    dd@...
                    http://www.dandrake.com/index.html
                  • Steve Hayes
                    ... No, I think it s an interesting point. If you read Charles Williams s book on Witchcraft you can see how the pagan Germans used to burn suspected witches
                    Message 9 of 12 , Apr 10 11:21 AM
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                      On 10 Apr 2013 at 10:44, Dan Drake wrote:

                      >
                      > On Apr 9, 2013, at 8:56 PM, Steve Hayes wrote:
                      >
                      > > That, I suspect, reflects the pagan notion of heroic virtue, or virtuous
                      > > heroism, untempered by any Christian notions of mercy.
                      > >
                      > > In effect, it is a glorification of armed robbery, which, in the eyes of the
                      > > narrator of the poem at least, is virtuous.
                      >
                      > It's useful to be reminded of that poem, which I have always found loathsome
                      > since I first heard any of it beyond the first two lines, with their clever,
                      > jolly-rogue quality. ("What? The guy is SERIOUS?" Sheeesh!" IMHO.)
                      >
                      > But there seems to be another thread to this matter, which hasn't been touched
                      > on. It's an account that I picked up a number of years ago, from a couple of
                      > sources, though I can't recall which, and it also seems to be just in the air
                      > to some extent.
                      >
                      > In this account the whole Chivalric Ideal is a more or less conscious attempt
                      > to get at the ruffians, bold in battle and highly skilled, who dominated
                      > Europe in the early Middle Ages, and civilize them by imbuing them with
                      > Christian virtue. If this is accurate, the effort certainly succeeded on a
                      > literary level, and probably on a practical one as well. As to at least the
                      > part of the ideal that constituted romanic love, I recall something of the
                      > sort from C. S. Lewis; but I don't remember whether he said much of the matter
                      > of valor, which concerns us here.
                      >
                      > Am I missing the obvious, or stating the too obvious, or maybe both?

                      No, I think it's an interesting point.

                      If you read Charles Williams's book on "Witchcraft" you can see how the pagan
                      Germans used to burn suspected witches because they thought they were
                      incorrigible. Christianising them inculcated a more merciful attitude, and
                      punished witchcraft accusations as much as the deed. That lasted about 5
                      centuries, just about until the height of the age of chivalry, perhaps. Then
                      it suddenly broke down in the Great European Witch Hunt which really got
                      going in the 15th century -- wasn't that about the time Malory et al were
                      writing about chivalry?




                      --
                      Steve Hayes
                      E-mail: shayes@...
                      Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
                      Phone: 083-342-3563 or 012-333-6727
                      Fax: 086-548-2525
                    • Dan Drake
                      ... Now there s a connection I never made. Along with a major rise of Inquisitions, for which there are some obvious historical reasons (purging Spain of the
                      Message 10 of 12 , Apr 10 11:33 AM
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                        On Apr 10, 2013, at 11:21 AM, Steve Hayes wrote:

                        > Then
                        > it suddenly broke down in the Great European Witch Hunt which really got
                        > going in the 15th century -- wasn't that about the time Malory et al were
                        > writing about chivalry?

                        Now there's a connection I never made. Along with a major rise of Inquisitions, for which there are some obvious historical reasons (purging Spain of the Paynim Horde; Luther; Gutenberg; etc etc). Connections among all these are well beyond me to analyze, though.

                        --
                        Dan Drake
                        dd@...
                        http://www.dandrake.com/index.html
                      • Graham Darling
                        See C.S. Lewis The Necessity of Chivalry , originally /Time and Tide/, 1940-08-17, vol 21, p 841; reprinted in /Present Concerns/, 1986, p 13;
                        Message 11 of 12 , Apr 10 11:44 AM
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                          See C.S. Lewis "The Necessity of Chivalry", originally Time and Tide, 1940-08-17, vol 21, p 841; reprinted in Present Concerns, 1986, p 13; http://www.amazon.com/dp/0156027852/ref=cm_sw_su_dp#reader_0156027852 .

                          The Four Cardinal Virtues (common to all humanity: see Plato The Republic,
                          Steph 427ff) are Justice, Prudence (Wisdom), Temperance (Self-Mastery) and Fortitude.

                          The Three Theological Virtues (special to Christians) are Faith, Hope and Love (Charity).

                          On 2013-04-10 10:44 , Dan Drake wrote:
                          On Apr 9, 2013, at 8:56 PM, Steve Hayes wrote:
                          
                          
                          That, I suspect, reflects the pagan notion of heroic virtue, or virtuous 
                          heroism, untempered by any Christian notions of mercy. 
                          
                          In effect, it is a glorification of armed robbery, which, in the eyes of the 
                          narrator of the poem at least, is virtuous.
                          
                          It's useful to be reminded of that poem, which I have always found loathsome since I first heard any of it beyond the first two lines, with their clever, jolly-rogue quality. ("What? The guy is SERIOUS?" Sheeesh!" IMHO.) 
                          
                          But there seems to be another thread to this matter, which hasn't been touched on. It's an account that I picked up a number of years ago, from a couple of sources, though I can't recall which, and it also seems to be just in the air to some extent.
                          
                          In this account the whole Chivalric Ideal is a more or less conscious attempt to get at the ruffians, bold in battle and highly skilled, who dominated Europe in the early Middle Ages, and civilize them by imbuing them with Christian virtue. If this is accurate, the effort certainly succeeded on a literary level, and probably on a practical one as well. As to at least the part of the ideal that constituted romanic love, I recall something of the sort from C. S. Lewis; but I don't remember whether he said much of the matter of valor, which concerns us here.
                          
                          Am I missing the obvious, or stating the too obvious, or maybe both?
                          -GD
                          -- 
                          
                          Mr. Graham Darling, PhD
                          1007-D Gilmore Ave.
                          Burnaby, BC   V5C 4S4
                          Canada
                          
                          Phone 778-836-7122
                          Email darlingg@...
                          
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