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Re: [eldil] Digest Number 168

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  • Richard Lyman
    Agrred: but Williams did come very close to allegory in The House by the Stable and Grab and Grace . Richard Sturch. ________________________________ From:
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2012
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      Agrred: but Williams did come very close to allegory in "The House by the Stable" and "Grab and Grace".
      Richard Sturch.

      From: "eldil@yahoogroups.com" <eldil@yahoogroups.com>
      To: eldil@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, 31 October 2012, 8:10
      Subject: [eldil] Digest Number 168

      NeoInklings

      2 New Messages

      Digest #168

      Messages

      Tue Oct 30, 2012 2:50 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Steve Hayes" hayesstw

      The Inklings it isn't, but I greatly enjoyed reading "The elegance of the
      hedgehog" by Muriel Barbery, which gives some insight into the meaning of
      ubuntu.

      My review is here, in case anyone is interested:

      http://khanya. wordpress. com/2012/ 10/30/the- elegance- of-the-hedgehog/

      and some of the responses prompted me to wonder whether an android can
      understand ubuntu, whether or not it's dreaming of electric sheep.

      http://t.co/ n6a0cpiK

      --
      Steve Hayes
      E-mail: shayes@dunelm. org.uk
      Web: http://hayesfam. bravehost. com/litmain. htm
      http://www.goodread s.com/hayesstw


      Wed Oct 31, 2012 1:01 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Steve Hayes" hayesstw

      Williams was not an allegorist as, for example, was John Bunyan, whose
      Christian cannot be made to symbolize Everyman or any man, but only Christian
      man. He was an imagist like Dante, whose actual Beatrice was a symbol of many
      things besides salvation, and could have been used to symbolize and
      indefinite number of other things, some of them inimical to salvation. A
      convenient illustration of the distinction between allegory and imagery
      comes from the opening verse of Psalm 19, "The heavens declare the glory of
      God," which can be read either way.

      To begin with allegory: the psalmist may have wished to communicate an idea
      of God's glory that was already reasonably clear to him, and looking around,
      decided that this concept could be expressed better by comparing it with the
      heavens that with the oceans, the mountains, the birth-death- rebirth cycle of
      nature, or the splendor of the human heart. To enhance the poetic effect, he
      may have turned the literally exact but passive statement, "The glory of God
      is like the heavens", into the figurative but active. "The heavens declare
      the glory of God". If he functioned in this manner (and we have no way of
      knowing whether he did), using the heavens, the law, and other aspects of the
      world as convenient illustrations, he was an allegorist. Many people do
      habitually think in this manner, and apparently it is their natural mode of
      thought.

      On the other hand, the psalmist may have looked at the heavens and discovered
      that they revealed to him something that he did not already know about the
      divine glory, so that his line was a literal description of his experience.
      If he observed the world in this way, with the things ands activities around
      him serving as instruments for discovery, he was an imagist, and in company
      with many others to whom imagery is a natural mode of thinking and
      perceiving.

      Source: Lewis & Williams 1974:7 (article by Mary McDermott Shideler)

      --
      Steve Hayes
      E-mail: shayes@dunelm. org.uk
      Web: http://hayesfam. bravehost. com/litmain. htm
      http://www.goodread s.com/hayesstw


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    • Steve Hayes
      ... Now those I have not read, or even heard of before! -- Steve Hayes E-mail: shayes@dunelm.org.uk Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/litmain.htm
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 31, 2012
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        On 31 Oct 2012 at 10:12, Richard Lyman wrote:

        > Agrred: but Williams did come very close to allegory in "The House by the
        > Stable" and "Grab and Grace".

        Now those I have not read, or even heard of before!


        --
        Steve Hayes
        E-mail: shayes@...
        Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/litmain.htm
        http://www.goodreads.com/hayesstw
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