Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

The necessity of mythology

Expand Messages
  • shoemakers525
    I teach in a classical school where our literature, Latin, and history curricula include a very broad swatch of mythologies. Literature includes the works of
    Message 1 of 2 , May 8, 2012
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      I teach in a classical school where our literature, Latin, and history curricula include a very broad swatch of mythologies. Literature includes the works of Homer, Vergil, and Sophocles. Latin includes Vergil, Ovid, etc. History includes primary source documents by Seutonius and the Renaissance authors and "historians". (Let us also not put aside the philosophers and theologians who make regular references to established mythologies and use them to illustrate their points.) I would argue that these, far from being distractions or detrimental to the students' development and understanding of their worldview are actually a necessary part of that development.

      1. A myth is not necessarily fiction.
      I often teach my students in the Bible class that to label something as mythical does not make it false. Abraham is certainly a character of mythical proportions; David became the mythical King of Kings in the Psalms and slays "his ten thousands"; and Peter and Paul's shadows could heal the sick! Are these people or the events of their lives untrue? Not at all! They have simply been raised to a level beyond what is human (Called "pure and holy and spotless" though we know from the biblical accounts that they are far from that) and held as examples for the community.

      2.Mythos takes us alongside the story.
      The myths of literature and other sources take us alongside the story and teach us the truths to be garnered from them. Myth is essential because man understands that he is not alone in the universe and there are forces beyond his comprehension. Myth is necessary as part of our development as scholars as we seek to see meaning in histories, biblical accounts, and literary expressions of culture and philosophy.

      Thoughts?
    • Ahnemann
      Truly a great post, and wonderful teaching lessons! Just to expand- myth expresses perhaps the deepest truth. C. Jung and others expressed this fact very well.
      Message 2 of 2 , May 8, 2012
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Truly a great post, and wonderful teaching lessons! Just to expand- myth expresses perhaps the deepest truth. C. Jung and others expressed this fact very well. Much uproar here about a sign atheists put up about Jesus, it's a myth. To which thinking Christians reply, Of _course_ it's a myth! More later when time permits. Thank you for this thread!
        AJA

        Sent from my iPad

        On May 8, 2012, at 2:42 PM, shoemakers525 <shoemakers525@...> wrote:

         

        I teach in a classical school where our literature, Latin, and history curricula include a very broad swatch of mythologies. Literature includes the works of Homer, Vergil, and Sophocles. Latin includes Vergil, Ovid, etc. History includes primary source documents by Seutonius and the Renaissance authors and "historians". (Let us also not put aside the philosophers and theologians who make regular references to established mythologies and use them to illustrate their points.) I would argue that these, far from being distractions or detrimental to the students' development and understanding of their worldview are actually a necessary part of that development.

        1. A myth is not necessarily fiction.
        I often teach my students in the Bible class that to label something as mythical does not make it false. Abraham is certainly a character of mythical proportions; David became the mythical King of Kings in the Psalms and slays "his ten thousands"; and Peter and Paul's shadows could heal the sick! Are these people or the events of their lives untrue? Not at all! They have simply been raised to a level beyond what is human (Called "pure and holy and spotless" though we know from the biblical accounts that they are far from that) and held as examples for the community.

        2.Mythos takes us alongside the story.
        The myths of literature and other sources take us alongside the story and teach us the truths to be garnered from them. Myth is essential because man understands that he is not alone in the universe and there are forces beyond his comprehension. Myth is necessary as part of our development as scholars as we seek to see meaning in histories, biblical accounts, and literary expressions of culture and philosophy.

        Thoughts?

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.