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RE: [eldil] The City and the Stars by Arthur C. Clarke

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  • Ann Ahnemann
    From: eldil@yahoogroups.com [mailto:eldil@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Lubbers Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2010 3:02 PM To: eldil@yahoogroups.com
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 4, 2010
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      From: eldil@yahoogroups.com [mailto:eldil@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Lubbers
      Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2010 3:02 PM
      To: eldil@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [eldil] The City and the Stars by Arthur C. Clarke

       

       


      I didn't care at all for Ender's Game.  I'm not big on the IQ == Übermensch philosophy.  So much more goes into being human than just raw processing power.  Compare how Madeleine L'Engle handles Charles Wallace in A Wrinkle In Time to Ender and his compatriots in Card's books.

       

      As for City And The Stars, I read this when I was 14 and it blew me away.  I recently re-read it as an adult and caught the coming-of-age story that it truly is.  Every adolescent/young adult must feel pretty much the same way as Alvin, and of course, our entire western culture passed through a phase somewhat like this in the 60s.  We didn't find Lys, though.

       

      For sheer mythic force, Childhood's End is superior to CATS, but I don't think it's as good a novel.  It's too didactic, kind of like the evolutionary humanist's response to Perelandra, which is about 1/3 a lecture on Christian dogma set in the most ravishing land/seascape possible.

       

      I thought Ender's Game was a good intro book, great for youth.  I read all the Ender Series in my late 50s.

      Ender pretty much had renounced the Ubermensch thing in the last of the series.  IQ?  I would have thought AI.  Now, _that_ interests me.  It looks to me that is where the world is headed, and if we don't like it we'd better wake up and head it off.  But that's another discussion

      The so-called Christian parallels or hints in Card's works of course didn't annoy me in the least.  As similar in Tolkien works exist, though denied by some, don't bother.  In fact the theme informs the entire work. Same with Space Trilogy by CSL.  Card, btw, is Mormon- which is not a belief that I hold (should anyone care).  But I really dislike reading something of which I continually have to ask, What in heaven's name is the _point_? 

      AJA

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