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No more SpareOom

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  • AnnA
    I left SpareOom, the moderated C. S. Lewis Yahoo group, yesterday. Currently the moderator and another member are mired in a discussion about who is closer to
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 1, 2010
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      I left SpareOom, the moderated C. S. Lewis Yahoo group, yesterday. Currently the moderator and another member are mired in a discussion about who is closer to God- Catholics (the moderator Ray) or Protestants (Mike). The discussion has absolutely nothing to do with C. S. Lewis who for years had a caring correspondance with Father Calabria. The current discussion at SpareOom is the antithesis of this relationship.
      I'm here with the some 26 of you to discuss the works of the Inklings. I hope that more people will find this group. Those of you on Facebook could perhaps pass the word.
      Blessings,
      Ann
    • Steve Hayes
      ... Welcome... Things have been very quiet around here, so perhaps you can help to liven them up. -- Steve Hayes E-mail: shayes@dunelm.org.uk Web:
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 1, 2010
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        On 1 Dec 2010 at 13:18, AnnA wrote:

        > I left SpareOom, the moderated C. S. Lewis Yahoo group, yesterday. Currently
        > the moderator and another member are mired in a discussion about who is closer
        > to God- Catholics (the moderator Ray) or Protestants (Mike). The discussion
        > has absolutely nothing to do with C. S. Lewis who for years had a caring
        > correspondance with Father Calabria. The current discussion at SpareOom is
        > the antithesis of this relationship. I'm here with the some 26 of you to
        > discuss the works of the Inklings. I hope that more people will find this
        > group. Those of you on Facebook could perhaps pass the word. Blessings, Ann

        Welcome... Things have been very quiet around here, so perhaps you can help
        to liven them up.


        --
        Steve Hayes
        E-mail: shayes@...
        Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/STEVESIG.HTM
        Blog: http://methodius.blogspot.com
        Phone: 083-342-3563 or 012-333-6727
        Fax: 086-548-2525
      • Andrew Beussink
        I ended up leaving SpareOom as well. This is more like coinherence, but quieter, of course, since there are fewer people. Recently I started rereading the
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 1, 2010
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          I ended up leaving SpareOom as well.  This is more like coinherence, but quieter, of course, since there are fewer people.

          Recently I started rereading the Lord of the Rings, since I've watched the movies a few times since then and I was afraid that I couldn't even remember all of the differences between the two.  It's strange that even with how deep and dark the story goes, it is quite a pleasant read, and Tolkien evidently loved to tell stories.  I also have been listening to some songs based on Tolkien's songs and poems by Colin Rudd (on Youtube -- I can link them if anyone's interested).  Some of them show sides of Tolkien that you don't see as clearly through Lord of the Rings, like "Shadow Bride" in the Adventures of Tom Bombadil.  "The Mewlips" is good as well; Rudd does an excellent job with that one.  His version of "Cottage of Lost Play" (from Book of Lost Tales, Vol. 1) is stunningly beautiful, as well.  Anybody heard of him?
        • Ann Ahnemann
          I read The Lord of the Rings trilogy a before the films came out. To be honest much of it seemed like walk up hill and down, fight, walk up hill and down. As
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 1, 2010
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            I read The Lord of the Rings trilogy a before the films came out.  To be honest much of it seemed like walk up hill and down, fight, walk up hill and down.  As literature it seemed disjointed in so many ways and yet the whole a brilliant achievement of story, songs, new language.  I read it all too late in life, I think.

            I very much enjoyed the films however.  I know the criticism from real fans is that the films weren't faithful to the books.  I saw that also.  But the films made sense of the whole for me.  I should really go back and have at the books again.  I do remember most the characterization in the books.  But Golem in the movie was incredibly well done, I think.  I can't get him, the personification of greed, out of my mind.

            I'll have to look up Colin Rudd.  Give us the link if you have time.

            AJA

             

            From: eldil@yahoogroups.com [mailto:eldil@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrew Beussink
            Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2010 11:09 PM
            To: eldil@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [eldil] No more SpareOom

             

             

            I ended up leaving SpareOom as well.  This is more like coinherence, but quieter, of course, since there are fewer people.

            Recently I started rereading the Lord of the Rings, since I've watched the movies a few times since then and I was afraid that I couldn't even remember all of the differences between the two.  It's strange that even with how deep and dark the story goes, it is quite a pleasant read, and Tolkien evidently loved to tell stories.  I also have been listening to some songs based on Tolkien's songs and poems by Colin Rudd (on Youtube -- I can link them if anyone's interested).  Some of them show sides of Tolkien that you don't see as clearly through Lord of the Rings, like "Shadow Bride" in the Adventures of Tom Bombadil.  "The Mewlips" is good as well; Rudd does an excellent job with that one.  His version of "Cottage of Lost Play" (from Book of Lost Tales, Vol. 1) is stunningly beautiful, as well.  Anybody heard of him?

          • Andrew Beussink
            Overall, I do agree that the films were done very well. The extended editions are better, I think. The only issue I can think of is Faramir bringing Frodo
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 2, 2010
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              Overall, I do agree that the films were done very well.  The extended editions are better, I think.  The only issue I can think of is Faramir bringing Frodo and the ring to Osgiliath, which hurt the contrast between him and Boromir.  But as far as movie adaptations go, you can't hope for much of a better job than that.

              Here's a playlist for Colin Rudd: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C3C26014FA098A76&feature=bf-title

              Andrew
            • Ann Ahnemann
              Thanks for the link to Colin Rudd, Andrew. Lovely; made my day. Here s a playlist for Colin Rudd: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C3C26014FA098A76
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 2, 2010
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                Thanks for the link to Colin Rudd, Andrew.  Lovely; made my day.


                Here's a playlist for Colin Rudd: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=C3C26014FA098A76&feature=bf-title


                By the way, how would you rate C. S. Lewis' Space Trilogy?  Certainly it is not as revered (if that is the word)

                worldwide as the Tolkien works.  But I think Perelandra is sublime.  I'd be interested in anyone's assessment of Lewis vis a vis Tolkien.

                 

                AJA

              • Ann Ahnemann
                DRAT! Today I can t get into Eldil!! Ann So here s what I posted (or would have had Eldil Yahoo Group been accessed): You may have seen reported on the news
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 2, 2010
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                  DRAT!  Today I can't get into Eldil!!

                  Ann

                  So here's what I posted (or would have had Eldil Yahoo Group been accessed):

                  You may have seen reported on the news that an atheist organization has put up a large billboard at the entrance to the Lincoln Tunnel in NYC that reads:  You know it's a myth.  This season celebrate REASON.

                  A Catholic organization has recently retaliated with a billboard opposite which reads: You know it's read.  This season celebrate Jesus.

                  When I first saw the original sign I said to myself, Of COURSE it's a myth. 

                  The word myth has morphed of course from the Greek 'mythos'. In Webster's that is  "a pattern of beliefs expressing often symbolically the characteristic or prevalent attitudes in a group or culture."

                  I'm sure Steve could provide a better definition or meaning of the Greek word.  The word myth today most often in the secular world is used to mean an unfounded or false notion, a thing having only an imaginary existence.

                  What is myth?  Persons who are here must know much about myth. The Inklings were masters of myth.  Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy, The Silmarillion; C. S. Lewis' Til We Have Faces and his Space Trilogy, The Chronicles of Narnia; Charles Williams novels, The Place of the Lion, All Hallow's Eve, Descent Into Hell, The Greater Trumps, Many Dimensions, War in Heaven.

                  A passed friend of the Inklings George MacDonald's works stand out as great myths:  Lilith, Phantastes and other stories.

                  Has anyone read Gormenghast by Mervyn Peake?  Oh my word!! Titus Groan!!!

                  --To be continued.  Ann Ahnemann

                • Andrew Beussink
                  People I ve run into always say they like Perelandra the best. I don t really know which one would be my favorite; they re all so different, and I appreciate
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 3, 2010
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                    People I've run into always say they like Perelandra the best.  I don't really know which one would be my favorite; they're all so different, and I appreciate each of them.  Out of the Silent Planet might be my favorite simply because it's more of a standard space adventure, and Lewis's creative imagination shows though with the world and beings he creates on Malacandra.

                    Till We Have Faces is my favorite book... I'd say it was better than Lord of the Rings, and it's only in places of the Silmarillion does Tolkien match it.

                    Andrew
                  • Ann Ahnemann
                    Yes Perelandra. And Til We Have Faces is sublime. I m still digesting Robert s myth post. A great piece and I will respond later. I ve got to get back to
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 3, 2010
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                      Yes Perelandra.  And 'Til We Have Faces is sublime.  I'm still digesting Robert's myth post.  A great piece and I will respond later.

                      I've got to get back to the Silmarillion.

                      Now I'm reading Clarke's The City and the Stars.  Fabulous so far.  Reminds me of Charles Williams, Descent Into Hell maybe.  So much to talk about!

                      AJA

                    • Steve Hayes
                      ... I read Perelandra first of the space trilogy, but liked it least. I liked Out of the silent planet more, though, perhaps because it had moral and
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 3, 2010
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                        On 3 Dec 2010 at 12:48, Andrew Beussink wrote:

                        > People I've run into always say they like Perelandra the best. I don't
                        > really know which one would be my favorite; they're all so different, and I
                        > appreciate each of them. Out of the Silent Planet might be my favorite simply
                        > because it's more of a standard space adventure, and Lewis's creative
                        > imagination shows though with the world and beings he creates on Malacandra.

                        I read "Perelandra" first of the space trilogy, but liked it least.

                        I liked "Out of the silent planet" more, though, perhaps because it had moral
                        and political lessons that were more immediately politically relevant to me,
                        yet without being moralistic or didactic. Lewis's description of Weston's
                        conversation with the Oyarsa (Archon) of Malacandra is one of the hardest-
                        hitting indictments of imperialism and colonialism that I have ever read. As
                        I wrote on one of my web pages at:

                        http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/LITERARY.HTM

                        "towards the end there is a scene in which the protagonist, Ransom, is in a
                        gathering with the Oyarsa (planetary ruler or tutelary deity) of Malacandra,
                        and Weston and Devine, the mad scientist and the mad financier, are brought
                        before the Oyarsa. Weston is a caricature, not only of a mad scientist, but
                        also of colonialists and imperialists of the age in which Lewis wrote. He
                        embarks on a defence of interplanetary imperialism, which has to be
                        translated by Ransom, because neither Weston nor Devine have bothered to
                        learn the language of Malacandra. Ransom has great difficulty in translating,
                        because he has to explain human sin, which has not been experienced on
                        Malacandra. Eventually the Oyarsa observes that he now sees what the "bent
                        Oyarsa" of the silent planet (Earth) has done - he has taken something good -
                        the love of kin - and twisted it to make it appear to be the supreme good."

                        And that, of course, is precisely how the devil promoted apartheid.

                        Ind it still applies in some ways, though people do not speak much in favour
                        of apartheid any more, but some still rail against "multiculturalism" - yet
                        Lewis shows hnau who differ not merely in culture but in appearance living in
                        harmony.

                        But I like "That hideous strength" even more, and it is closer to Charles
                        Williams in style.

                        Among Charles Williams's nooks most people seem to like "All Hallows Eve" or
                        "Descent into Hell" the best, yet those are the ones I like the least. My
                        favourite is "The place of the Lion", closely followed by "War in heaven" and
                        "The Greater Trumps".

                        > Till We Have Faces is my favorite book... I'd say it was better than Lord of
                        > the Rings, and it's only in places of the Silmarillion does Tolkien match it.

                        Of Lewis's books, I have to say I like "That hideous strength" the best.


                        --
                        Steve Hayes
                        E-mail: shayes@...
                        Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/STEVESIG.HTM
                        Blog: http://methodius.blogspot.com
                        Phone: 083-342-3563 or 012-333-6727
                        Fax: 086-548-2525
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