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RE: [eldil] Vampires in fiction and reality

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  • Ann Ahnemann
    Great article as great informative. Christians need to do a better job on all fronts. The undead??!! How horrific. What indeed would one do to be alive
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 16, 2010

      Great article as great informative.  Christians need to do a better job on all fronts.  The undead??!!  How horrific.  What indeed would one do to be 'alive' forever?  Sucking the lifeblood of others?  Seems that symbolically that is happening on every front from business to taxation and everything in between.  The American culture at least is steeped in rotting blood suckers and not those of the Dracula ilk.  No stake or hanks of garlic will stop these creatures who wear neat business clothes or sit in Congress or who go to church every week and partake of Communion for that matter.

      Americans it is noted have NEVER faced up to death and the meaning of death and tangentially life or the meaning of life either.  And the Church has done little to help.  I can't resist noting that one horrific icon is our Lord and Savior dead or dying nailed to a cross run through fingers, hanging around necks.  It is images however venerated such as the Crucifix which feeds the horror of death over life everlasting promised by Christ.

      What think you all? 

      AJA

       

       

      From: eldil@yahoogroups.com [mailto:eldil@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steve Hayes
      Sent: Friday, November 12, 2010 10:23 PM
      To: eldil@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [eldil] Vampires in fiction and reality

       

       

      One of the things that I find quite interesting is the tendency among some
      people to develop religions based on fictional characters. Sometimes it is at
      least partly tongue-incheek, as, for example, the campaign to get people to
      enter their religion on census forms as "Jedi Knight". But others seem to be
      dead serious, as this post on John Morehead's blog shows:

      "One of the helpful features of Amazon.com is its “Customers Who Bought This
      Item Also Bought…” recommendations. In a quest for new research and
      discussion topics using this feature I came across a book by Mary Y. Hallab,
      titled Vampire God: The Allure of the Undead in Western Culture (SUNY Press,
      2009). I’m glad I discovered it. I read through a lot of materials for
      reflection and discussion, many good, some not so good. Hallab’s Vampire God
      is recommended for those interested in vampires, folklore, literature, and
      the frequently neglected connections of these topics to death and religion."

      http://www.theofantastique.com/2010/01/25/mary-y-hallab-vampire-god/

      In another post John mentioned "the vampire community" and referred to
      vampires as a "sub-culture".

      I don't think any of the Inklings wrote about vampires, though they may have
      mentioned them in passing, but I think some have had at least a tendency to
      believe that Hobbits are real, though I don't know of any active attempts to
      create a religion based on them.

      Has anyone come across anything like this, especially among the Inklings?

      I now fully expect to find a cult of blast-ended skrewts, accusing J.K.
      Rowling of maligning the skrewt community.

      --
      Steve Hayes
      E-mail: shayes@...
      Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/litmain.htm
      http://www.goodreads.com/hayesstw

    • Steve Hayes
      ... Concern about life after death. ... No, I didn t either, but I never managed to finish the book. I ve started it twice, and abandoned it about 2/3 of the
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 16, 2010
        On 16 Nov 2010 at 10:20, Ann Ahnemann wrote:

        > What do you all think the lure of the undead is in western culture? What
        > would the reason be??

        Concern about life after death.

        > Btw, reading Lilith I didn't think of her as a vampire, Richard. From
        > whence does the idea come?

        No, I didn't either, but I never managed to finish the book. I've started it
        twice, and abandoned it about 2/3 of the way through.




        --
        Steve Hayes
        E-mail: shayes@...
        Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/litmain.htm
        http://www.goodreads.com/hayesstw
      • Steve Hayes
        ... Last Sunday the gospel reading in church was the so-called parable of the Good Samaritan (interesting bit of racial stereotyping, that). But actually it
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 16, 2010
          On 16 Nov 2010 at 10:58, Ann Ahnemann wrote:

          > Great article as great informative. Christians need to do a better job on all
          > fronts. The undead??!! How horrific. What indeed would one do to be 'alive'
          > forever? Sucking the lifeblood of others? Seems that symbolically that is
          > happening on every front from business to taxation and everything in between.
          > The American culture at least is steeped in rotting blood suckers and not
          > those of the Dracula ilk. No stake or hanks of garlic will stop these
          > creatures who wear neat business clothes or sit in Congress or who go to
          > church every week and partake of Communion for that matter.

          Last Sunday the gospel reading in church was the so-called parable of the
          "Good Samaritan" (interesting bit of racial stereotyping, that). But actually
          it is about Jesus and the lawyer, and the lawyer asks what he must do to
          inherit eternal life.

          And that raises the question of what we mean by "eternal life".

          Long before I read "Dracula", when I was about 8 years old our school was
          taken to see some plays put on by another school. I've forgotten most of
          them, but one was memorable, and I've never forgotten it. It was called "The
          monkey's paw". If you know the plot, skip the next paragraph.

          If you don't know the plot, it's about a family that has a lucky monkey paw,
          which can be used to make three wishes. They wish for a lot of money, and
          there is a knock at the door, with someone from the factory where the son
          works, to say he has been killed in an industrial accident, but the firm will
          give compensation -- to the amount that they wished for. They are horrified,
          and decide they would rather have their son alive than the money and so they
          wish for his return. There is another knock at the door, and this time it is
          their son, horribly mutilated from the accident. They realise that that is
          not what they want either, and wish that he is dead again.

          And that is not eternal life that we read about in the gospels. And the
          original vampire folklore has the same theme. Vampires are not living, they
          are just undead.

          Stephen King's novel "Pet sematary" also has the same theme. He also wrote
          one on vampires, "'Salem's Lot", but that was merely derivative, a pale
          shadow of "Dracula".

          But there is something about vampires that appeals to Western society.
          Originally the undead were people you really didn't want to be around, and
          there were all sorts of devices to make sure they stayed in the grave. But
          they have been glamourised, and now there are even, I am told, "vegetarian
          vampires".

          > Americans it is noted have NEVER faced up to death and the meaning of death
          > and tangentially life or the meaning of life either. And the Church has done
          > little to help. I can't resist noting that one horrific icon is our Lord and
          > Savior dead or dying nailed to a cross run through fingers, hanging around
          > necks. It is images however venerated such as the Crucifix which feeds the
          > horror of death over life everlasting promised by Christ.

          But that is the paradox of Christianity and the point of it. Christians took
          the symbol of a shameful and painful death, and made it a symbol of victory
          over death, so that we speak of "the honourable and life-giving cross".




          >
          > What think you all?
          >
          > AJA
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > From: eldil@yahoogroups.com [mailto:eldil@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          > Steve Hayes
          > Sent: Friday, November 12, 2010 10:23 PM
          > To: eldil@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [eldil] Vampires in fiction and reality
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > One of the things that I find quite interesting is the tendency among some
          > people to develop religions based on fictional characters. Sometimes it is at
          > least partly tongue-incheek, as, for example, the campaign to get people to
          > enter their religion on census forms as "Jedi Knight". But others seem to be
          >
          > dead serious, as this post on John Morehead's blog shows:
          >
          > "One of the helpful features of Amazon.com is its "Customers Who Bought This
          >
          > Item Also Bought." recommendations. In a quest for new research and
          > discussion topics using this feature I came across a book by Mary Y. Hallab,
          >
          > titled Vampire God: The Allure of the Undead in Western Culture (SUNY Press,
          >
          > 2009). I'm glad I discovered it. I read through a lot of materials for
          > reflection and discussion, many good, some not so good. Hallab's Vampire God
          >
          > is recommended for those interested in vampires, folklore, literature, and the
          > frequently neglected connections of these topics to death and religion."
          >
          > http://www.theofantastique.com/2010/01/25/mary-y-hallab-vampire-god/
          >
          > In another post John mentioned "the vampire community" and referred to
          > vampires as a "sub-culture".
          >
          > I don't think any of the Inklings wrote about vampires, though they may have
          >
          > mentioned them in passing, but I think some have had at least a tendency to
          > believe that Hobbits are real, though I don't know of any active attempts to
          >
          > create a religion based on them.
          >
          > Has anyone come across anything like this, especially among the Inklings?
          >
          > I now fully expect to find a cult of blast-ended skrewts, accusing J.K.
          > Rowling of maligning the skrewt community.
          >
          > --
          > Steve Hayes
          > E-mail: shayes@... <mailto:shayes%40dunelm.org.uk>
          > Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/litmain.htm
          > http://www.goodreads.com/hayesstw
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          Steve Hayes
          E-mail: shayes@...
          Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/litmain.htm
          http://www.goodreads.com/hayesstw
        • Ann Ahnemann
          ... Steve wrote: But that is the paradox of Christianity and the point of it. Christians took the symbol of a shameful and painful death, and made it a symbol
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 16, 2010

             

             

            I wrote:

            >I can't resist noting that one horrific icon is our Lord and

            > Savior dead or dying nailed to a cross run through fingers, hanging around
            > necks. It is images however venerated such as the Crucifix which feeds the
            > horror of death over life everlasting promised by Christ.
            Steve wrote:
            But that is the paradox of Christianity and the point of it. Christians took
            the symbol of a shameful and painful death, and made it a symbol of victory
            over death, so that we speak of "the honourable and life-giving cross".
            A:
            I understand the symbol of the sacrifice Jesus made for all.  But that is not a live Christ on the cross. It is

            a dead body.  Life giving cross?  Not in that symbol for me.  I'm reading The Secret of the Rosary by St. Louis De Montfort in the hope

            that I learn something of the loyalty to the Rosary.

            AJA

          • Steve Hayes
            One of the things that I find quite interesting is the tendency among some people to develop religions based on fictional characters. Sometimes it is at least
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 17, 2010
              One of the things that I find quite interesting is the tendency among some
              people to develop religions based on fictional characters. Sometimes it is at
              least partly tongue-in-cheek, as, for example, the campaign to get people to
              enter their religion on census forms as "Jedi Knight". But others seem to be
              dead serious, as this post on John Morehead's blog shows:

              "One of the helpful features of Amazon.com is its “Customers Who Bought This
              Item Also Bought…” recommendations. In a quest for new research and
              discussion topics using this feature I came across a book by Mary Y. Hallab,
              titled Vampire God: The Allure of the Undead in Western Culture (SUNY Press,
              2009). I’m glad I discovered it. I read through a lot of materials for
              reflection and discussion, many good, some not so good. Hallab’s Vampire God
              is recommended for those interested in vampires, folklore, literature, and
              the frequently neglected connections of these topics to death and religion."

              In another post John mentioned "the vampire community" and referred to
              vampires as a "sub-culture".

              I don't think any of the Inklings wrote about vampires, though they may have
              mentioned them in passing, but I think some have had at least a tendency to
              believe that Hobbits are real, though I don't know of any active attempts to
              create a religion based on them.

              Has anyone come across anything like this, especially among the Inklings?

              I now fully expect to find a cult of blast-ended skrewts, accusing J.K.
              Rowling of maligning the skrewt community.


              --
              Steve Hayes
              E-mail: shayes@...
              Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/litmain.htm
              http://www.goodreads.com/hayesstw
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