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Re: Overhead Utility Friendly Trees

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  • billtoday43@aol.com
    Faye, The real problem is what to do with the Ash trees (27000 possible) that could be lost to the Emerald Ash Borer in the next 5-7 years. When that
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 1, 2009
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      Faye,
       
      The real problem is what to do with the Ash trees (27000 possible) that could be lost to the Emerald Ash Borer in the next 5-7 years.  When that happens, we'll have climate change.   What should we do?
       
      Replacing 300 - 500 trees a year in Madison, barely impacts micro climate.  MGE replaces only trees under power lines. (one side of the street.) 
       
      On Milwaukee street last year, I only saw smaller 9"-12" Ash trees being taken by the Right Tree in the Right place program.  On a more possitive note, as I move around everyday, I'm noticing that the Ash trees in some East side neighborhoods, are about 1 in 5. the bigger ones being American Elm, Maple and Locust.
      Some neighborhoods will be devastated.
       
      On a more positive side, that's lots of bio fuel for the co gen plants, and there are micro businesses popping up in the wake of the epidemic using the Ash wood for furniture and woodwork for houses.
       
      bill
    • fae dremock
      bill--I m not against dealing with the borer. I do however very much care that the trees being removed are being replaced with short trees that will never
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 1, 2009
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        bill--I'm not against dealing with the borer.
        I do however very much care that the trees being removed are being replaced with short trees that will never attain the heights of the power lines much less the heights and grandeur of the current ones. We should be replacing those trees with trees that will grow.
        (and we should be burying power lines-- that we as a city don't do that when the streets are torn up is absurd--  economically as well)

        Let's not conflate these two very different issues.

        fae


        On Mon, Jun 1, 2009 at 8:00 AM, <billtoday43@...> wrote:


        Faye,
         
        The real problem is what to do with the Ash trees (27000 possible) that could be lost to the Emerald Ash Borer in the next 5-7 years.  When that happens, we'll have climate change.   What should we do?
         
        Replacing 300 - 500 trees a year in Madison, barely impacts micro climate.  MGE replaces only trees under power lines. (one side of the street.) 
         
        On Milwaukee street last year, I only saw smaller 9"-12" Ash trees being taken by the Right Tree in the Right place program.  On a more possitive note, as I move around everyday, I'm noticing that the Ash trees in some East side neighborhoods, are about 1 in 5. the bigger ones being American Elm, Maple and Locust.
        Some neighborhoods will be devastated.
         
        On a more positive side, that's lots of bio fuel for the co gen plants, and there are micro businesses popping up in the wake of the epidemic using the Ash wood for furniture and woodwork for houses.
         
        bill


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      • adam chern
        I agree that power lines should be buried as roads are rebuilt. It would not only benefit the big, formerly beautiful v-ed trees, but they are just plain ugly
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 1, 2009
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          I agree that power lines should be buried as roads are rebuilt.  It would not only benefit the big, formerly beautiful v-ed trees, but they are just plain ugly in winter.  The utilities resist the expense, but I expect it is a long term savings for them.  If the community is united it will happen.  Homeowners also incur an expense to have the lines from the street to the residence buried.  We, as individuals, must either be willing/able to pay for this or create a city program to help homeowners similar to the lead line replacement program.  It sounds like a good use of stimulus monies.  Shovel ready indeed.
           
          Adam


          From: einpc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:einpc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of fae dremock
          Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 8:21 AM
          To: einpc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [einpc] Re: Overhead Utility Friendly Trees


          bill--I'm not against dealing with the borer.
          I do however very much care that the trees being removed are being replaced with short trees that will never attain the heights of the power lines much less the heights and grandeur of the current ones. We should be replacing those trees with trees that will grow.
          (and we should be burying power lines-- that we as a city don't do that when the streets are torn up is absurd--  economically as well)

          Let's not conflate these two very different issues.

          fae


          On Mon, Jun 1, 2009 at 8:00 AM, <billtoday43@ aol.com> wrote:


          Faye,
           
          The real problem is what to do with the Ash trees (27000 possible) that could be lost to the Emerald Ash Borer in the next 5-7 years.  When that happens, we'll have climate change.   What should we do?
           
          Replacing 300 - 500 trees a year in Madison, barely impacts micro climate.  MGE replaces only trees under power lines. (one side of the street.) 
           
          On Milwaukee street last year, I only saw smaller 9"-12" Ash trees being taken by the Right Tree in the Right place program.  On a more possitive note, as I move around everyday, I'm noticing that the Ash trees in some East side neighborhoods, are about 1 in 5. the bigger ones being American Elm, Maple and Locust.
          Some neighborhoods will be devastated.
           
          On a more positive side, that's lots of bio fuel for the co gen plants, and there are micro businesses popping up in the wake of the epidemic using the Ash wood for furniture and woodwork for houses.
           
          bill



          An Excellent Credit Score is 750. See Yours in Just 2 Easy Steps!

        • billtoday43@aol.com
          Faye, I m with you. let s stop talking the ash borer thing. Getting agreement on prevention will be a miracle. Power lines are being buried in new sub
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 1, 2009
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            Faye,
            I'm with you. let's stop talking the ash borer thing. Getting agreement on prevention will be a miracle.
             
            Power lines are being buried in new sub divisions.  Cool.   While planting power lines is a good idea, it won't be happening any time soon on Milwaukee st. where I live because the streets won't be replaced anytime soon. However, there are trees that pose a risk to utility lines, in a major storm.
             
            Are you saying that we should leave the trees alone when there is a substantial risk and just take our chances?  A power line on Milwaukee st going down will effect several square miles of houses.  Power out to that many houses on a average February day, would leave houses without heat. Probably cause lots of freeze up's.  How do you weigh that probability against replanting smaller trees under those power lines?
             
            In answer to Adam. 
             
            The homeowner cost of burying lines would be about $15,000 on top of the increased electric bills and taxes.  I would guess that it would cost about $30,000 to be paid off in 10 years as many civic improvements are. I'm rough guessing $45,000 per house total in addition to what we are paying now.  It will be hard to unit around that.
             
            I think that the stimulus money is spoken for. So should we fix our water problems,  or school problems, build new green energy infrastructure or bury power lines?  HHmmm. I won't be looking for buried power lines soon.
             
            Not because it isn't a good idea. But because its a poor fiscal idea.
             
            I have a huge multi trunk locust tree that is creeping into my house.  I took one trunk off so I could plant a vegi garden. The remaining trunk is 3" away from the house. It smacks the house when the wind blows real hard. In 3 or 4 years, it'll have to come down.  Should I do it when its convenient or when it crashes into the house?  It will take all of my shade away.  It also prevents solar installation.  Hhhmmm.  Hard decisions.  Sometimes the trees can't be saved.
             
            bill
             
          • wayne blake
            how about legelization of cannibus and taxation? To: einpc@yahoogroups.com From: billtoday43@aol.com Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2009 23:18:16 -0400 Subject: [einpc] Re:
            Message 5 of 15 , Jun 2, 2009
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              how about legelization of cannibus and taxation?



               



              To: einpc@yahoogroups.com
              From: billtoday43@...
              Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2009 23:18:16 -0400
              Subject: [einpc] Re: Overhead Utility Friendly Trees



              Faye,
              I'm with you. let's stop talking the ash borer thing. Getting agreement on prevention will be a miracle.
               
              Power lines are being buried in new sub divisions.  Cool.   While planting power lines is a good idea, it won't be happening any time soon on Milwaukee st. where I live because the streets won't be replaced anytime soon. However, there are trees that pose a risk to utility lines, in a major storm.
               
              Are you saying that we should leave the trees alone when there is a substantial risk and just take our chances?  A power line on Milwaukee st going down will effect several square miles of houses.  Power out to that many houses on a average February day, would leave houses without heat. Probably cause lots of freeze up's.  How do you weigh that probability against replanting smaller trees under those power lines?
               
              In answer to Adam. 
               
              The homeowner cost of burying lines would be about $15,000 on top of the increased electric bills and taxes.  I would guess that it would cost about $30,000 to be paid off in 10 years as many civic improvements are. I'm rough guessing $45,000 per house total in addition to what we are paying now.  It will be hard to unit around that.
               
              I think that the stimulus money is spoken for. So should we fix our water problems,  or school problems, build new green energy infrastructure or bury power lines?  HHmmm. I won't be looking for buried power lines soon.
               
              Not because it isn't a good idea. But because its a poor fiscal idea.
               
              I have a huge multi trunk locust tree that is creeping into my house.  I took one trunk off so I could plant a vegi garden. The remaining trunk is 3" away from the house. It smacks the house when the wind blows real hard. In 3 or 4 years, it'll have to come down.  Should I do it when its convenient or when it crashes into the house?  It will take all of my shade away.  It also prevents solar installation.  Hhhmmm.  Hard decisions.  Sometimes the trees can't be saved.
               
              bill
               




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            • Ted Voth Jr
              It s cannabis. And taxation is already legal. ... -- Troops out of Iraq and Afghanistan now. No Afghan Surge Yours for the Constitution, the Republic, and
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 2, 2009
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                It's 'cannabis.' And taxation is already legal.

                On Tue, Jun 2, 2009 at 2:51 AM, wayne blake <roxxydee@...> wrote:




                how about legelization of cannibus and taxation?



                 



                To: einpc@yahoogroups.com
                From: billtoday43@...
                Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2009 23:18:16 -0400
                Subject: [einpc] Re: Overhead Utility Friendly Trees



                Faye,
                I'm with you. let's stop talking the ash borer thing. Getting agreement on prevention will be a miracle.
                 
                Power lines are being buried in new sub divisions.  Cool.   While planting power lines is a good idea, it won't be happening any time soon on Milwaukee st. where I live because the streets won't be replaced anytime soon. However, there are trees that pose a risk to utility lines, in a major storm.
                 
                Are you saying that we should leave the trees alone when there is a substantial risk and just take our chances?  A power line on Milwaukee st going down will effect several square miles of houses.  Power out to that many houses on a average February day, would leave houses without heat. Probably cause lots of freeze up's.  How do you weigh that probability against replanting smaller trees under those power lines?
                 
                In answer to Adam. 
                 
                The homeowner cost of burying lines would be about $15,000 on top of the increased electric bills and taxes.  I would guess that it would cost about $30,000 to be paid off in 10 years as many civic improvements are. I'm rough guessing $45,000 per house total in addition to what we are paying now.  It will be hard to unit around that.
                 
                I think that the stimulus money is spoken for. So should we fix our water problems,  or school problems, build new green energy infrastructure or bury power lines?  HHmmm. I won't be looking for buried power lines soon.
                 
                Not because it isn't a good idea. But because its a poor fiscal idea.
                 
                I have a huge multi trunk locust tree that is creeping into my house.  I took one trunk off so I could plant a vegi garden. The remaining trunk is 3" away from the house. It smacks the house when the wind blows real hard. In 3 or 4 years, it'll have to come down.  Should I do it when its convenient or when it crashes into the house?  It will take all of my shade away.  It also prevents solar installation.  Hhhmmm.  Hard decisions.  Sometimes the trees can't be saved.
                 
                bill
                 


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