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RE: [einpc] bus wraps fate, city council, Tues, July 1, 6:30 PM

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  • Rummel, Marsha
    Mike, I think the point about the very real possibility that some riders will switch to paratransit and the potentially negative cost impact of that shift is
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 1, 2008
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      Mike,
       
      I think the point about the very real possibility that some riders will switch to paratransit and the potentially negative cost impact of that shift is very important, thank you. I hope you and others who speak tonight will comment about the compromise to allow half and partial wraps.
       
      Thanks for keeping our eyes on the prize.
       
      Marsha


      From: einpc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:einpc@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Michael D. Barrett
      Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 10:43 PM
      To: einpc@yahoogroups.com; sasyna-discussions@yahoogroups.com; mabaaa@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: David Waugh
      Subject: Re: [einpc] bus wraps fate, city council, Tues, July 1, 6:30 PM

      At 7:09 PM -0500 6/30/08, David Waugh wrote:

      >June
      30,2008
      >
      >We need folks to come and testify against full bus wraps
      tomorrow night
      >at the city council meeting.

      This could be a test as to whether the "find 4 friends and come to
      the council" rule really works or not.

      Susan DeVos recently wrote a little analysis of how this bus wrap
      thing could actually backfire in Metro's face, financially speaking.
      Here's the scoop: Apparently some people with disabilities are having
      a hard time recognizing a city bus as such (e.g., in some cases,
      seeing-eye dogs not recognizing the bus) or are having difficulty
      seeing their stop outside of the bus. These and other difficulties
      could end up shifting some riders over to para-transit, a
      significantly more expensive option compared to the mainlines. It
      apparently wouldn't take many people shifting over to evaporate all
      revenues gained by the wraps.

      -Mike

    • Michael D. Barrett
      And then unfortunately I can t make tonight (a good friend s mom recently passed away), but I m hoping that my email support for David Waugh s campaign against
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 1, 2008
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        And then unfortunately I can't make tonight (a good friend's mom
        recently passed away), but I'm hoping that my email support for David
        Waugh's campaign against the wraps counts for something.

        I'd like to add that a lot of work has gone into Madison Metro's Long
        Range Plan. It hasn't been adopted yet, but it is wending its way
        through the commissions. I don't agree with all of it (there are some
        important things it excluded), but it did receive a lot of public
        input. One of the things that was central to the plan was the concept
        of branding; creating a unified image of the service to promote
        itself.

        City Engineering gets to "brand' themselves through that fancy
        imprint on the sewer hole covers. Why shouldn't Madison Metro get to
        brand itself through a uniform image on their buses? (Other cities
        brand themselves on their sewer covers, but at least it is an
        acknowledgement of the people's investment, rather than the
        glorification of some fiefdom within the city bureaucracy, but that's
        another story for another, ahem, rant).

        Madison Metro should have the same branding opportunity, free of
        interference from other messages (ok, being the moderate that I am,
        *heh!*, I'm ok with the subsidiary messages on the small boards, but
        that is about as far as I'm willing to go).

        Here is an excerpt from the plan:
        **************
        13. Image
        Metro should always be working towards improving its brand and image.
        It's important to
        reinforce the positive experience of riding the bus and the sense of
        community experienced while
        sharing the ride. Metro's main message and image should be based upon
        results from market
        research and staff input. The message and image should be simple and
        be marketed through rider
        testimonials and pictures to capture and clarify a more personal
        connection with Metro.
        **********************

        I can't think of a better way to improve its brand and image than
        maintaining a uniform appearance across all buses all of the time. As
        for Metro's main message and image...based upon results from market
        research, well, David posted the results of those, and quite
        obviously Metro's ridership doesn't like the wraps. And I can't think
        of a better way to make the "message and image...simple" than to keep
        the look of the buses uniform.

        Not long ago I was kind of agnostic on the whole idea of bus wraps.
        In my heart of hearts I didn't like it, but I fully recognized the
        dire financial straits of transit. Any cash is good cash. But the
        more I look at it, from a branding standpoint (that's cash in the
        bank, folks!) and from the financial blowback probability given the
        service issues wrt riders with disabilities, it all looks like a raw
        deal.

        -Mike


        At 2:31 PM -0500 7/1/08, Rummel, Marsha wrote:
        >Mike,
        >
        >I think the point about the very real possibility that some riders
        >will switch to paratransit and the potentially negative cost impact
        >of that shift is very important, thank you. I hope you and others
        >who speak tonight will comment about the compromise to allow half
        >and partial wraps.
        >
        >Thanks for keeping our eyes on the prize.
        >
        >Marsha
      • Rich Felsing
        If you can t really see where you are, how do you know when to get off? This isn t really about the disabled, either---*new riders* have to watch the street
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 1, 2008
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          If you can't really see where you are, how do you know when to get off? 
           
          This isn't really about the disabled, either---new riders have to watch the street signs like a hawk to make sure they don't miss their stop.  Making that impossible, or just difficult to know where you are, is fairly perverse when encouraging transit use is such a critical priority.
           
          Transit experts point to the comfort level and to amenities as important keys to increasing ridership.  If the view is just about hte only pleasure you get in riding a bus---and we take that away---we're just cutting off our nose to improve our looks.
           
          Worse, we're going against what every transit success story tells us about building a great, economically competitive city.  Why stick around here when San Franciscans (Daisy) can ride in one of these:
           
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erlWqNnbdRY

          I was disappointed to see Satya describe 'partial' wraps as a 'compromise'.  The proposal has wraps still covering all of some buses and 'partial' wraps covering all of one side of the rest.  That's no compromise.  Not when Madison is in the driver's seat on this.  The buses are prime advertising space; they get seen by everybody.  Increase the ad rates below the windows and keep all windows clear of obstruction---and the space becomes more valuable, not less.
           
          Find sponsors to launch a snazzy, amenity-laden ride like the Green Bus linked above, and the PR is priceless.  Take a gander at both links above!  People will fight to get get on board these things---and wherever transit officials do put 'em on the road, residents will be bragging about their cities.
           
          But the disrespect evident in treating bus customers as as captive resource, is hardly admirable.  We know, pretty much, what needs to be done to make transit inviting and successful---we know what the solutions are and how to put them in place.  Moving in the other direction isn't progressive or effective policy.  Like Captain Kirk, we have to find a Third Way; somewhere between Sex and Death lies a really slick bus ride!  But a false compromise, because we don't have the imagination or because it's easy, shouldn't be the default.  We don't have time for that, because somewhere Daisy is riding the Green Bus, having the last laugh. 
           
          It's about being economically competitive.  Personally, I'd rather ride on a solution like this:  
           
          GREEN BUS Features:
          Key Features • 95 percent emissions-free hybrid vehicle that helps offset up to 55,000 car trips (270 tons of carbon emissions) each year • Pervasive, high-speed Internet access for all passengers \ • Live NextMuni updates (route information, wait times, and more) via touchscreen • Ability to contact friends, family, and coworkers via wireless devices • "Green Gauge" that provides information on the environmental impact of The Connected Bus as it travels through San Francisco

          Benefits
          • Reduces emissions as more drivers turn to public transit, and as vehicles themselves run more efficiently. Emission-reduction factors fall into four categories:
          – Reduced dwell time: The amount of time a transit vehicle remains idling at a stop while passengers board, make inquiries of the operator, pay fares, and exit the vehicle.
          – Timely maintenance: A rigorous preventive maintenance program geared to each vehicle manufacturer, ensuring that transit vehicles stay in good repair and produce fewer emissions.
          – Efficient on-street operation: Efficient operation of the vehicle at the individual operator level will reduce emissions, as will efficient management of vehicles on each line of service.
          – Enhanced rider experience: By offering real-time information and enhanced safety and security to passengers, public transit becomes a more attractive option in San Francisco, a "Transit First" city.

          • Enriches transit rider and operator experience, as defined by information accessibility, increased comfort, and green incentives. Connected Bus riders and operators will experience:
          – Prominent display of on-bus, real-time information, including status of connections at key transfer points. Allows riders to reach their destinations more reliably.
          – Real-time arrival information and passenger counts to help fleet managers ensure adequate capacity; addresses loading conditions and bus-to-bus transfers.
          – "Green" programs, which increase the reward for new riders who have switched from driving by offering data counts of environmental benefits per rider.
          – Online trackability of new, integrated data, allowing potential riders to follow select routes on the network, inviting them to switch to public transit with greater assurance.
          – New, publicly accessible data linkages, which offer innovative lifestyle benefits such as a parent tracking a child's use of SFMTA by employing a mobile device to monitor a trip connection in real time, or a hotel concierge directing visitors to destinations with greater confidence.

          • Helps the SFMTA comply with Federal Transit Administration (FTA) standards regarding regional and national interoperability.
          – Enables vendors to connect to one standard device, exclusive of vehicle manufacturer, for both bus and rail.
          – Increases operational effective-ness because there will be fewer on-board devices and points of failure.
          – Enables on-board integration of systems such as APC (automatic passenger counter) and Transit Signal Priority to ensure that priority is given based on vehicle load to create a smarter vehicle.
          – Decreases technology upgrade costs—only one device (versus many) will require cyclical
          upgrades based on technological advancements.

          • Improves reliability, as measured by schedule accuracy, operator availability, vehicle
          reliability, supervisor coverage, and congestion management. The Connected Bus
          on-board integration device address all five of these criteria:
          – Helps improve schedule accuracy by linking GPS to APC.
          – Addresses operator availability by using AVL (automatic vehicle location) to manage headways that are impacted by missed runs.
          – Increases vehicle reliability by tracking vehicle health and integrating resulting data to inform fleet deployment more effectively.
          – Provides the on-street supervisor with the technology to cover the system through NextMuni AVL/GPS data, vehicle health-monitoring data, APC, and other critical, real-time information.
          – Improves congestion management through integration of signal timing, cameras, and other traffic-monitoring devices.

          • Increases transit operator effectiveness by enabling more effective communications, including:
          – Real-time display of key data, relieving the burden of information sharing between driver and rider. Destinations, transfer points, and arrival times of connecting buses are all immediately evident to passengers.

             
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
          On 6/30/08, David Waugh <waugh@...> wrote:

          June 30,2008

          We need folks to come and testify against full bus wraps tomorrow night
          at the city council meeting.

          The trial is over and the city council may vote on whether to continue
          the practice of fully wrapping public buses at their meeting tomorrow
          night, Tuesday, July 1st. Unfortunately, the overwhelming public
          response to wrapped buses has not been enough for some decision makers.
          My near east/central Isthmus neighborhood listserver petition had 90
          signatures. Metro's own survey had a whopping 841 responses, of which a
          full 60% report a negative reaction to riding a wrapped bus.

          Alders in favor of wrapped buses are trying to intimidate folks with a
          threat of rate hikes and route cuts if they cannot get wrapped
          advertising. This is completely misleading and disingenuous as metro is
          already subsidized heavily by the city of Madison, and alders can find
          money elsewhere in order to maintain service. The wrapped buses bring
          in 1/5 of a penny for every dollar in their budget.

          There is more than a little confusion on exactly what will happen
          Tuesday night at the council meeting. There are conflicting resolutions
          from the two committees whom help guide the decision. The parking and
          transportation committee voted for 20 full wraps and unlimited partial
          wraps. A partial wrap would allow Adams advertising to fully cover one
          side of the bus, leaving only the windows on the other side clear. (Yes,
          every city bus could have one side painted as a billboard.) The board
          of estimates committee voted to reduce full wraps to 10 with unlimited
          partial wraps. And finally, Alder Satya Rhodes-Conway introduced an
          amended resolution to allow no full wraps and only 20 partial wraps.

          So, the council has conflicting resolutions to deal with tomorrow night.

          If you can, please put in one more pitch against wrappping our city
          buses. The most effective thing you can do is come to the meeting
          Tuesday night, register, and say a few words. Or, simply come to the
          building, register in opposition to bus wraps and leave. If you cannot
          come at all, please send an email to all alders expressing your opinion
          on their form at http://www.cityofmadison.com/council/contact.cfm .
          Actually, send them an email even if you are planning on coming.

          Here are the logistics:
          What: City Council Meeting
          When: 6:30 PM, Tuesday, July 1
          Where: Room 201, City-County Building
          210 Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard
          Agenda item: currently 94

          Here are the links to the surveys if you wish to see the many comments
          about wrapped buses.

          http://www.cityofmadison.com/metro/wrapsummary.pdf
          http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/metrowraps/signatures.html

          It is very sad that at a time when our city should be encouraging
          ridership, they are making buses uncomfortable to ride. I'm more than a
          little discouraged that metro management and some alders are ignoring
          the feedback of metro customers. However, Alders Satya Rhodes-Conway,
          Alder Michael Verveer and Alder Robbie Webber, have spoken out against
          these wraps at Board of Estimates and Parking and Transportation
          committee meetings.

          This past year an ad hoc committee has been working on how to make metro
          transit sustainable over time. Their number one recommendation: Provide
          a positive customer experience. This was completely lost on the
          majority of the members of the Parking and Transportation committee.
          One committee member, when discussing wraps, relayed how her friends
          reported motion sickness. She asked if couldn't Adams Advertising leave
          at least one window unwrapped? I wonder if she even rides the bus. Or
          perhaps the bus she takes only has one person.

          I hope to see you Tuesday!

          David Waugh
          1213 East Mifflin Street
          Madison, WI
          251-7713


        • Michael Jacob
          Hi Rich, et al, I believe Alder Rhodes-Conway s compromise has ZERO full wraps, 20 half wraps (which could cover the driver side only), 20 wraps that cover
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 1, 2008
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            Hi Rich, et al,

            I believe Alder Rhodes-Conway's compromise has ZERO full wraps, 20 half wraps (which could cover the driver side only), 20 wraps that cover some but not all windows, and an unlimited number of "wraps" that don't cover any windows. So no longer would any rider who has challenges with the covered windows be without an option (so, at worst, the wrap on 40 buses would dictate which seat they might have to sit in).

            This compromise brings in more money than the current number of full wraps, but not quite as much as the other proposal which has many many full wraps. As David W noted, the "not quite as much" amounts to all of one fifth of one percent of Metro's budget. And as Mike B noted, the net benefit may drop if some riders end up on paratransit. And as Rick F. notes here, it will be even less if other riders end up not riding at all. I have great difficulty believing the extra funds brought in, if any after all is said and done, will save any hours of service in the future, much less the next route on the chopping block.

            I think the compromise does a balanced job at bringing in more funds while still respecting Metro's true bread and butter, the majority of its current and potential fare-paying masses.

            Michael Jacob

            On Tue, Jul 1, 2008 at 4:20 PM, Rich Felsing <rich.felsing@...> wrote:

            If you can't really see where you are, how do you know when to get off? 
             
            This isn't really about the disabled, either---new riders have to watch the street signs like a hawk to make sure they don't miss their stop.  Making that impossible, or just difficult to know where you are, is fairly perverse when encouraging transit use is such a critical priority.
             
            Transit experts point to the comfort level and to amenities as important keys to increasing ridership.  If the view is just about hte only pleasure you get in riding a bus---and we take that away---we're just cutting off our nose to improve our looks.
             
            Worse, we're going against what every transit success story tells us about building a great, economically competitive city.  Why stick around here when San Franciscans (Daisy) can ride in one of these:
             
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erlWqNnbdRY

            I was disappointed to see Satya describe 'partial' wraps as a 'compromise'.  The proposal has wraps still covering all of some buses and 'partial' wraps covering all of one side of the rest.  That's no compromise.  Not when Madison is in the driver's seat on this.  The buses are prime advertising space; they get seen by everybody.  Increase the ad rates below the windows and keep all windows clear of obstruction---and the space becomes more valuable, not less.
             
            Find sponsors to launch a snazzy, amenity-laden ride like the Green Bus linked above, and the PR is priceless.  Take a gander at both links above!  People will fight to get get on board these things---and wherever transit officials do put 'em on the road, residents will be bragging about their cities.
             
            But the disrespect evident in treating bus customers as as captive resource, is hardly admirable.  We know, pretty much, what needs to be done to make transit inviting and successful---we know what the solutions are and how to put them in place.  Moving in the other direction isn't progressive or effective policy.  Like Captain Kirk, we have to find a Third Way; somewhere between Sex and Death lies a really slick bus ride!  But a false compromise, because we don't have the imagination or because it's easy, shouldn't be the default.  We don't have time for that, because somewhere Daisy is riding the Green Bus, having the last laugh. 
             
            It's about being economically competitive.  Personally, I'd rather ride on a solution like this:  
             
            GREEN BUS Features:
            Key Features • 95 percent emissions-free hybrid vehicle that helps offset up to 55,000 car trips (270 tons of carbon emissions) each year • Pervasive, high-speed Internet access for all passengers \ • Live NextMuni updates (route information, wait times, and more) via touchscreen • Ability to contact friends, family, and coworkers via wireless devices • "Green Gauge" that provides information on the environmental impact of The Connected Bus as it travels through San Francisco

            Benefits
            • Reduces emissions as more drivers turn to public transit, and as vehicles themselves run more efficiently. Emission-reduction factors fall into four categories:
            – Reduced dwell time: The amount of time a transit vehicle remains idling at a stop while passengers board, make inquiries of the operator, pay fares, and exit the vehicle.
            – Timely maintenance: A rigorous preventive maintenance program geared to each vehicle manufacturer, ensuring that transit vehicles stay in good repair and produce fewer emissions.
            – Efficient on-street operation: Efficient operation of the vehicle at the individual operator level will reduce emissions, as will efficient management of vehicles on each line of service.
            – Enhanced rider experience: By offering real-time information and enhanced safety and security to passengers, public transit becomes a more attractive option in San Francisco, a "Transit First" city.

            • Enriches transit rider and operator experience, as defined by information accessibility, increased comfort, and green incentives. Connected Bus riders and operators will experience:
            – Prominent display of on-bus, real-time information, including status of connections at key transfer points. Allows riders to reach their destinations more reliably.
            – Real-time arrival information and passenger counts to help fleet managers ensure adequate capacity; addresses loading conditions and bus-to-bus transfers.
            – "Green" programs, which increase the reward for new riders who have switched from driving by offering data counts of environmental benefits per rider.
            – Online trackability of new, integrated data, allowing potential riders to follow select routes on the network, inviting them to switch to public transit with greater assurance.
            – New, publicly accessible data linkages, which offer innovative lifestyle benefits such as a parent tracking a child's use of SFMTA by employing a mobile device to monitor a trip connection in real time, or a hotel concierge directing visitors to destinations with greater confidence.

            • Helps the SFMTA comply with Federal Transit Administration (FTA) standards regarding regional and national interoperability.
            – Enables vendors to connect to one standard device, exclusive of vehicle manufacturer, for both bus and rail.
            – Increases operational effective-ness because there will be fewer on-board devices and points of failure.
            – Enables on-board integration of systems such as APC (automatic passenger counter) and Transit Signal Priority to ensure that priority is given based on vehicle load to create a smarter vehicle.
            – Decreases technology upgrade costs—only one device (versus many) will require cyclical
            upgrades based on technological advancements.

            • Improves reliability, as measured by schedule accuracy, operator availability, vehicle
            reliability, supervisor coverage, and congestion management. The Connected Bus
            on-board integration device address all five of these criteria:
            – Helps improve schedule accuracy by linking GPS to APC.
            – Addresses operator availability by using AVL (automatic vehicle location) to manage headways that are impacted by missed runs.
            – Increases vehicle reliability by tracking vehicle health and integrating resulting data to inform fleet deployment more effectively.
            – Provides the on-street supervisor with the technology to cover the system through NextMuni AVL/GPS data, vehicle health-monitoring data, APC, and other critical, real-time information.
            – Improves congestion management through integration of signal timing, cameras, and other traffic-monitoring devices.

            • Increases transit operator effectiveness by enabling more effective communications, including:
            – Real-time display of key data, relieving the burden of information sharing between driver and rider. Destinations, transfer points, and arrival times of connecting buses are all immediately evident to passengers.

               
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
            On 6/30/08, David Waugh <waugh@...> wrote:

            June 30,2008

            We need folks to come and testify against full bus wraps tomorrow night
            at the city council meeting.

            The trial is over and the city council may vote on whether to continue
            the practice of fully wrapping public buses at their meeting tomorrow
            night, Tuesday, July 1st. Unfortunately, the overwhelming public
            response to wrapped buses has not been enough for some decision makers.
            My near east/central Isthmus neighborhood listserver petition had 90
            signatures. Metro's own survey had a whopping 841 responses, of which a
            full 60% report a negative reaction to riding a wrapped bus.

            Alders in favor of wrapped buses are trying to intimidate folks with a
            threat of rate hikes and route cuts if they cannot get wrapped
            advertising. This is completely misleading and disingenuous as metro is
            already subsidized heavily by the city of Madison, and alders can find
            money elsewhere in order to maintain service. The wrapped buses bring
            in 1/5 of a penny for every dollar in their budget.

            There is more than a little confusion on exactly what will happen
            Tuesday night at the council meeting. There are conflicting resolutions
            from the two committees whom help guide the decision. The parking and
            transportation committee voted for 20 full wraps and unlimited partial
            wraps. A partial wrap would allow Adams advertising to fully cover one
            side of the bus, leaving only the windows on the other side clear. (Yes,
            every city bus could have one side painted as a billboard.) The board
            of estimates committee voted to reduce full wraps to 10 with unlimited
            partial wraps. And finally, Alder Satya Rhodes-Conway introduced an
            amended resolution to allow no full wraps and only 20 partial wraps.

            So, the council has conflicting resolutions to deal with tomorrow night.

            If you can, please put in one more pitch against wrappping our city
            buses. The most effective thing you can do is come to the meeting
            Tuesday night, register, and say a few words. Or, simply come to the
            building, register in opposition to bus wraps and leave. If you cannot
            come at all, please send an email to all alders expressing your opinion
            on their form at http://www.cityofmadison.com/council/contact.cfm .
            Actually, send them an email even if you are planning on coming.

            Here are the logistics:
            What: City Council Meeting
            When: 6:30 PM, Tuesday, July 1
            Where: Room 201, City-County Building
            210 Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard
            Agenda item: currently 94

            Here are the links to the surveys if you wish to see the many comments
            about wrapped buses.

            http://www.cityofmadison.com/metro/wrapsummary.pdf
            http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/metrowraps/signatures.html

            It is very sad that at a time when our city should be encouraging
            ridership, they are making buses uncomfortable to ride. I'm more than a
            little discouraged that metro management and some alders are ignoring
            the feedback of metro customers. However, Alders Satya Rhodes-Conway,
            Alder Michael Verveer and Alder Robbie Webber, have spoken out against
            these wraps at Board of Estimates and Parking and Transportation
            committee meetings.

            This past year an ad hoc committee has been working on how to make metro
            transit sustainable over time. Their number one recommendation: Provide
            a positive customer experience. This was completely lost on the
            majority of the members of the Parking and Transportation committee.
            One committee member, when discussing wraps, relayed how her friends
            reported motion sickness. She asked if couldn't Adams Advertising leave
            at least one window unwrapped? I wonder if she even rides the bus. Or
            perhaps the bus she takes only has one person.

            I hope to see you Tuesday!

            David Waugh
            1213 East Mifflin Street
            Madison, WI
            251-7713



          • David Waugh
            The Rhodes-Conway amendment failed. The 20 full wrap original passed. These things are here to stay. David Waugh
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 1, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              The Rhodes-Conway amendment failed. The 20 full wrap original passed.
              These things are here to stay.

              David Waugh

              Michael Jacob wrote:
              >
              > Hi Rich, et al,
              >
              > I believe Alder Rhodes-Conway's compromise has ZERO full wraps, 20
              > half wraps (which could cover the driver side only), 20 wraps that
              > cover some but not all windows, and an unlimited number of "wraps"
              > that don't cover any windows. So no longer would any rider who has
              > challenges with the covered windows be without an option (so, at
              > worst, the wrap on 40 buses would dictate which seat they might have
              > to sit in).
              >
              > This compromise brings in more money than the current number of full
              > wraps, but not quite as much as the other proposal which has many many
              > full wraps. As David W noted, the "not quite as much" amounts to all
              > of one fifth of one percent of Metro's budget. And as Mike B noted,
              > the net benefit may drop if some riders end up on paratransit. And as
              > Rick F. notes here, it will be even less if other riders end up not
              > riding at all. I have great difficulty believing the extra funds
              > brought in, if any after all is said and done, will save any hours of
              > service in the future, much less the next route on the chopping block.
              >
              > I think the compromise does a balanced job at bringing in more funds
              > while still respecting Metro's true bread and butter, the majority of
              > its current and potential fare-paying masses.
              >
              > Michael Jacob
              >
              > On Tue, Jul 1, 2008 at 4:20 PM, Rich Felsing <rich.felsing@...
              > <mailto:rich.felsing@...>> wrote:
              >
              > If you can't really see where you are, how do you know when to get
              > off?
              >
              > This isn't really about the disabled, either---*new riders* have
              > to watch the street signs like a hawk to make sure they don't miss
              > their stop. Making that impossible, or just difficult to know
              > where you are, is fairly perverse when encouraging transit use
              > is such a critical priority.
              >
              > Transit experts point to the comfort level and to amenities
              > as important keys to increasing ridership. If the view is just
              > about hte only pleasure you get in riding a bus---and we take
              > that away---we're just cutting off our nose to improve our looks.
              >
              > Worse, we're going against what every transit success story tells
              > us about building a great, economically competitive city. Why
              > stick around here when San Franciscans (Daisy) can ride in one of
              > these:
              > http://sfist.com/2008/02/20/at_least_you_ca.php
              > <http://sfist.com/2008/02/20/at_least_you_ca.php>
              >
              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erlWqNnbdRY
              > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erlWqNnbdRY>
              >
              > I was disappointed to see Satya describe 'partial' wraps as a
              > 'compromise'. The proposal has wraps still covering all of some
              > buses and 'partial' wraps covering all of one side of the rest.
              > That's no compromise. Not when Madison is in the driver's seat on
              > this. The buses are prime advertising space; they get seen by
              > everybody. Increase the ad rates below the windows and keep all
              > windows clear of obstruction---and the space becomes more
              > valuable, not less.
              >
              > Find sponsors to launch a snazzy, amenity-laden ride like the
              > Green Bus linked above, and the PR is priceless. Take a gander at
              > both links above! People will fight to get get on board these
              > things---and wherever transit officials do put 'em on the road,
              > residents will be bragging about their cities.
              >
              > But the disrespect evident in treating bus _customers_ as as
              > captive resource, is hardly admirable. We know, pretty much, what
              > needs to be done to make transit inviting and successful---we know
              > what the solutions are and how to put them in place. Moving in
              > the other direction isn't progressive or effective policy. Like
              > Captain Kirk, we have to find a Third Way; somewhere between Sex
              > and Death lies a really slick bus ride! But a false compromise,
              > because we don't have the imagination or because it's easy,
              > shouldn't be the default. We don't have time for that, because
              > somewhere Daisy is riding the Green Bus, having the last laugh.
              >
              > It's about being economically competitive. Personally, I'd rather
              > ride on a solution like this:
              >
              > *_GREEN BUS Features:_*
              >
              > Key Features • 95 percent emissions-free hybrid vehicle that
              > helps offset up to 55,000 car trips (270 tons of carbon
              > emissions) each year • Pervasive, high-speed Internet access
              > for all passengers \ • Live NextMuni updates (route
              > information, wait times, and more) via touchscreen • Ability
              > to contact friends, family, and coworkers via wireless devices
              > • "Green Gauge" that provides information on the environmental
              > impact of The Connected Bus as it travels through San Francisco
              >
              > Benefits
              > • Reduces emissions as more drivers turn to public transit,
              > and as vehicles themselves run more efficiently.
              > Emission-reduction factors fall into four categories:
              > – Reduced dwell time: The amount of time a transit vehicle
              > remains idling at a stop while passengers board, make
              > inquiries of the operator, pay fares, and exit the vehicle.
              > – Timely maintenance: A rigorous preventive maintenance
              > program geared to each vehicle manufacturer, ensuring that
              > transit vehicles stay in good repair and produce fewer emissions.
              > – Efficient on-street operation: Efficient operation of the
              > vehicle at the individual operator level will reduce
              > emissions, as will efficient management of vehicles on each
              > line of service.
              > – Enhanced rider experience: By offering real-time information
              > and enhanced safety and security to passengers, public transit
              > becomes a more attractive option in San Francisco, a "Transit
              > First" city.
              >
              > • Enriches transit rider and operator experience, as defined
              > by information accessibility, increased comfort, and green
              > incentives. Connected Bus riders and operators will experience:
              > – Prominent display of on-bus, real-time information,
              > including status of connections at key transfer points. Allows
              > riders to reach their destinations more reliably.
              > – Real-time arrival information and passenger counts to help
              > fleet managers ensure adequate capacity; addresses loading
              > conditions and bus-to-bus transfers.
              > – "Green" programs, which increase the reward for new riders
              > who have switched from driving by offering data counts of
              > environmental benefits per rider.
              > – Online trackability of new, integrated data, allowing
              > potential riders to follow select routes on the network,
              > inviting them to switch to public transit with greater assurance.
              > – New, publicly accessible data linkages, which offer
              > innovative lifestyle benefits such as a parent tracking a
              > child's use of SFMTA by employing a mobile device to monitor a
              > trip connection in real time, or a hotel concierge directing
              > visitors to destinations with greater confidence.
              >
              > • Helps the SFMTA comply with Federal Transit Administration
              > (FTA) standards regarding regional and national interoperability.
              > – Enables vendors to connect to one standard device, exclusive
              > of vehicle manufacturer, for both bus and rail.
              > – Increases operational effective-ness because there will be
              > fewer on-board devices and points of failure.
              > – Enables on-board integration of systems such as APC
              > (automatic passenger counter) and Transit Signal Priority to
              > ensure that priority is given based on vehicle load to create
              > a smarter vehicle.
              > – Decreases technology upgrade costs—only one device (versus
              > many) will require cyclical
              > upgrades based on technological advancements.
              >
              > • Improves reliability, as measured by schedule accuracy,
              > operator availability, vehicle
              > reliability, supervisor coverage, and congestion management.
              > The Connected Bus
              > on-board integration device address all five of these criteria:
              > – Helps improve schedule accuracy by linking GPS to APC.
              > – Addresses operator availability by using AVL (automatic
              > vehicle location) to manage headways that are impacted by
              > missed runs.
              > – Increases vehicle reliability by tracking vehicle health and
              > integrating resulting data to inform fleet deployment more
              > effectively.
              > – Provides the on-street supervisor with the technology to
              > cover the system through NextMuni AVL/GPS data, vehicle
              > health-monitoring data, APC, and other critical, real-time
              > information.
              > – Improves congestion management through integration of signal
              > timing, cameras, and other traffic-monitoring devices.
              >
              > • Increases transit operator effectiveness by enabling more
              > effective communications, including:
              > – Real-time display of key data, relieving the burden of
              > information sharing between driver and rider. Destinations,
              > transfer points, and arrival times of connecting buses are all
              > immediately evident to passengers.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > On 6/30/08, *David Waugh* <waugh@...
              > <mailto:waugh@...>> wrote:
              >
              > June 30,2008
              >
              > We need folks to come and testify against full bus wraps
              > tomorrow night
              > at the city council meeting.
              >
              > The trial is over and the city council may vote on whether to
              > continue
              > the practice of fully wrapping public buses at their meeting
              > tomorrow
              > night, Tuesday, July 1st. Unfortunately, the overwhelming public
              > response to wrapped buses has not been enough for some
              > decision makers.
              > My near east/central Isthmus neighborhood listserver petition
              > had 90
              > signatures. Metro's own survey had a whopping 841 responses,
              > of which a
              > full 60% report a negative reaction to riding a wrapped bus.
              >
              > Alders in favor of wrapped buses are trying to intimidate
              > folks with a
              > threat of rate hikes and route cuts if they cannot get wrapped
              > advertising. This is completely misleading and disingenuous as
              > metro is
              > already subsidized heavily by the city of Madison, and alders
              > can find
              > money elsewhere in order to maintain service. The wrapped
              > buses bring
              > in 1/5 of a penny for every dollar in their budget.
              >
              > There is more than a little confusion on exactly what will happen
              > Tuesday night at the council meeting. There are conflicting
              > resolutions
              > from the two committees whom help guide the decision. The
              > parking and
              > transportation committee voted for 20 full wraps and unlimited
              > partial
              > wraps. A partial wrap would allow Adams advertising to fully
              > cover one
              > side of the bus, leaving only the windows on the other side
              > clear. (Yes,
              > every city bus could have one side painted as a billboard.)
              > The board
              > of estimates committee voted to reduce full wraps to 10 with
              > unlimited
              > partial wraps. And finally, Alder Satya Rhodes-Conway
              > introduced an
              > amended resolution to allow no full wraps and only 20 partial
              > wraps.
              >
              > So, the council has conflicting resolutions to deal with
              > tomorrow night.
              >
              > If you can, please put in one more pitch against wrappping our
              > city
              > buses. The most effective thing you can do is come to the meeting
              > Tuesday night, register, and say a few words. Or, simply come
              > to the
              > building, register in opposition to bus wraps and leave. If
              > you cannot
              > come at all, please send an email to all alders expressing
              > your opinion
              > on their form at
              > http://www.cityofmadison.com/council/contact.cfm
              > <http://www.cityofmadison.com/council/contact.cfm> .
              > Actually, send them an email even if you are planning on coming.
              >
              > Here are the logistics:
              > What: City Council Meeting
              > When: 6:30 PM, Tuesday, July 1
              > Where: Room 201, City-County Building
              > 210 Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard
              > Agenda item: currently 94
              >
              > Here are the links to the surveys if you wish to see the many
              > comments
              > about wrapped buses.
              >
              > http://www.cityofmadison.com/metro/wrapsummary.pdf
              > <http://www.cityofmadison.com/metro/wrapsummary.pdf>
              > http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/metrowraps/signatures.html
              > <http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/metrowraps/signatures.html>
              >
              > It is very sad that at a time when our city should be encouraging
              > ridership, they are making buses uncomfortable to ride. I'm
              > more than a
              > little discouraged that metro management and some alders are
              > ignoring
              > the feedback of metro customers. However, Alders Satya
              > Rhodes-Conway,
              > Alder Michael Verveer and Alder Robbie Webber, have spoken out
              > against
              > these wraps at Board of Estimates and Parking and Transportation
              > committee meetings.
              >
              > This past year an ad hoc committee has been working on how to
              > make metro
              > transit sustainable over time. Their number one
              > recommendation: Provide
              > a positive customer experience. This was completely lost on the
              > majority of the members of the Parking and Transportation
              > committee.
              > One committee member, when discussing wraps, relayed how her
              > friends
              > reported motion sickness. She asked if couldn't Adams
              > Advertising leave
              > at least one window unwrapped? I wonder if she even rides the
              > bus. Or
              > perhaps the bus she takes only has one person.
              >
              > I hope to see you Tuesday!
              >
              > David Waugh
              > 1213 East Mifflin Street
              > Madison, WI
              > 251-7713
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Michael D. Barrett
              ... Looks like Adams Billboard Company found a way around Madison s billboard cap after all. When it gets dry this summer, I ll be watering the street tree out
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 1, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                At 10:54 PM -0500 7/1/08, David Waugh wrote:
                >The Rhodes-Conway amendment failed. The 20 full wrap original passed.
                >These things are here to stay.
                >
                >David Waugh


                Looks like Adams Billboard Company found a way around Madison's
                billboard cap after all.

                When it gets dry this summer, I'll be watering the street tree out in
                front of their Wilson's Bar billboard on Atwood.

                -Mike
              • Theodore H Voth Jr
                Dear Marsha; Was that a roll-call vote on the bus-wraps? If so what were the votes? I had to leave when Sanborn was speaking. I found him heartless,
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 2, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dear Marsha;

                  Was that a roll-call vote on the bus-wraps? If so what were the votes?

                  I had to leave when Sanborn was speaking. I found him heartless, thoughtless, petty, myopic, just plain mean-spirited– infuriating. If I hadn't left I would have gotten myself thrown out. Apparently I don't suffer fools gladly.

                  It would seem the Council as a whole are like-minded with him.

                  Did anyone hear what I said about a coalition of Metro stakeholders to get proper funding from the State and the Feds?

                  Apparently Alders don't see themselves as stakeholders.

                  What are we going to do?

                  TV2

                  --
                  Cheney and Bush must be impeached. Time's a-wastin!

                  Yours for the Constitution, the Republic, and the rule of law,

                  Ted Voth Jr, Citizen
                  tedvothjr@...
                  1146 Williamson #3
                  Madison Wisconsin 53703
                  (608) 257-1799

                  We the people of the United States, in order to... promote the general welfare... do ordain and establish this Constitution...
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