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ELKS and .NET

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  • Arno Wagner
    Hi everybody! Before I start to call for discussion, let me say some words about .NET. Personally I do not share the general excitement. I see a strong
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 5, 2002
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      Hi everybody!

      Before I start to call for discussion, let me say some words about
      .NET. Personally I do not share the general excitement. I see a
      strong possibility that it will suffer the same fate as other plans
      "to revolutionize computing" out of Redmond have suffered, namely a
      quiet death. Furthermore I don't trust MS one bit to get it right. As
      somebody that does research into security, I have no trust at all into
      MS.

      I also do not see many people using main-stream languages to create
      high quality components where knowing the interface is really enough
      to use them. This takes a lot of discipline even in Eiffel. Mixed
      language projects are also not more attractive because of .NET.
      The ability to link modules from different languages is not
      new (in fact I did it on an ATARI ST a decade or so ago), and
      was never widely adopted. The reason may be an other problem than
      the binary format.

      Don't get me wrong, ignoring .NET might not be an option for
      people doing work on MS platforms. But I do not believe it
      makes our work here obsolete or redundant. Being able to switch
      from one compiler for a language to another one with minimal
      problems is a major advantage for a language.

      Furthermore we are not only specifying basic classes here. We are
      also setting an example on how it should be done. An example that
      everybody doing more complex things on top of ELKS can benefit
      from. And on a more personal level, I gained a lot of insights here in
      the past about the nature of the things the are actually modelled by
      ELKS classes.

      O.K., enough of that. I will now open the discussion on
      COMPARABLE in a separate message.

      Please feel free to discuss changes in the overall agenda as long as
      we have not gotten to that part of the agenda yet. I feel that we are
      competent enough to update the agenda from time to time without
      loosing our overall direction.

      Regards,
      Arno

      --
      Arno Wagner, Communication Systems Group, ETH Zuerich, wagner@...
      GnuPG: ID: 1E25338F FP: 0C30 5782 9D93 F785 E79C 0296 797F 6B50 1E25 338F
      ----
      For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple,
      and wrong. -- H L Mencken
    • Franck Arnaud
      ... It s largely true, but there has been some instances of mixed languages in widespread use: on Unix, scripting languages associated with C libraries (python
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 6, 2002
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        > The ability to link modules from different languages is not
        > new (...), and was never widely adopted.

        It's largely true, but there has been some instances of mixed
        languages in widespread use: on Unix, scripting languages associated
        with C libraries (python etc), and with Windows UIs with VB as glue
        for C/C++ UI components.

        > I do not believe it makes our work here obsolete or redundant.

        Agreed.

        > Furthermore we are not only specifying basic classes here. We are
        > also setting an example on how it should be done.

        We're constrained by the existing though, although there's
        still scope for doing good things within that constraint.
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