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Re: [efiwebheads] Happy New Year

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  • Roberto Antonio MG
     Happy New Year Webheads!!! It s still 10.08 am here in Mexico, I cannot wait for the New Year. May it bring you all the best. Enjoy your New Year parties
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 31, 2003
      �Happy New Year Webheads!!!

      It's still 10.08 am here in Mexico, I cannot wait for the New Year. May it bring you all the best. Enjoy your New
      Year parties wherever it is you live.

      Antonio
      Mexico City.

      ------- Original message -------�
      From: Michael Coghlan <michaelc@...>�
      Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 02:05:04 +1030�
      Subject: [efiwebheads] Happy New Year�

      2.00 am in Australia, January 1st, 2004. Have just got home from a
      wonderful New Year's party with old friends. And along with Aiden, I raise
      a glass of champagne to us all!

      Let's have another great year!

      - Michael C.





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    • Michael Coghlan
      2.00 am in Australia, January 1st, 2004. Have just got home from a wonderful New Year s party with old friends. And along with Aiden, I raise a glass of
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 31, 2003
        2.00 am in Australia, January 1st, 2004. Have just got home from a
        wonderful New Year's party with old friends. And along with Aiden, I raise
        a glass of champagne to us all!

        Let's have another great year!

        - Michael C.
      • Vance Stevens
        I ve just got back from a New Year s day of surfing in the shadow of the Burg al Arab, the famous over-luxurious hotel in Dubai. The surf wasn t too bad,
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 1, 2004
          I've just got back from a New Year's day of surfing in the shadow of
          the Burg al Arab, the famous over-luxurious hotel in Dubai. The surf
          wasn't too bad, http://www.surfersofdubai.com I'll post a picture
          shortly, and I have a few balcony shots for Michael as soon as I can
          move all the pixels into cyberspace.

          By now most of you must have recovered from whatever you did New
          Year's Eve or New Years day. It would be interesting to learn what
          activities Webheads have been up to in so many parts of the world. I
          know that Yaodong for example was hosting a party at an Alado
          chatroom on New Year's Eve (couldn't get there from my office though,
          not supposed to drink at work anyway ;-)

          Michael asked earlier about Christmas letters. It was interesting to
          learn that the tradition was foreign to Michael. In my many years of
          working with English-speakers from all over the world I find many
          differences in our celebrations. Back in the 70s the notion of
          Halloween was foreign to many of my British neighbors in Saudi Arabia
          so my wife and I and one or two friends dressed up in costume and
          took our beer mugs door to door, saying trick or treat, and forcing
          them to give us a wee drop of whatever it was they'd been brewing
          before we would move off their doorstep (that's not exactly the way
          kids do it in the USA but as my neighbors weren't familiar with the
          tradition, we were able to adapt it slightly). By costume I don't
          mean what we Americans call bathing suits. Since then I've learned
          that Brits call what we were wearing 'fancy dress'.

          Two other traditions that Brits have at Christmas, which Americans
          don't, are Christmas "Crackers" and what the Brits call 'mime'
          shows. To an American, a mime show suggests an actor in white-face
          who doesn't speak during the performance. Christmas mimes have
          actors and audience talking back and forth to one another (example
          dialog: he did! No he didn't! Yes he did). I also heard on BBC the
          other day a segment about people in the UK starting to decorate their
          houses with lights and lawn objects the way Americans do. It is
          always a pleasure when in America to drive around neighborhoods on
          cold December nights in a warm car with family admiring the effort
          people have put into decorating their houses and brightening their
          neighborhoods.

          Americans and British share the tradition of exchanging cards at
          Christmas, but I think that Brits value more highly than we ever-
          practical Yanks the old-world personal touch of a hand-written
          letter. Americans these days are just as happy to send eGreetings.
          When desk-top publishing became popular, many families started
          creating what we sometimes call 'brag & gag' newsletters giving the
          family history for the past year. As Christmas is the time that many
          of us put into action our urge to communicate with friends at least
          once a year, these long letters might be found tucked into
          traditional cards or might be simply sent by email. I post mine on
          my website http://www.vancestevens.com/xmas2003.htm. From observing
          my British colleagues I find that I am likely to receive cards from
          them at the office and I appreciate the personal touch, the actual
          signature on the tangible card. But I also receive a lot of these
          long email letters from friends from all over at Christmas time. I
          was telling Michael that a lot of these friends happen to be
          Scandinavian.

          I hope in this new year we can revive some of the list traffic we
          have all enjoyed, with so many Webheads from around the world sharing
          experiences and customs with each other.

          Happy New Year everyone,

          Vance


          --- In efiwebheads@yahoogroups.com, Michael Coghlan <michaelc@c...>
          wrote:
          > 2.00 am in Australia, January 1st, 2004. Have just got home from a
          > wonderful New Year's party with old friends. And along with Aiden,
          I raise
          > a glass of champagne to us all!
          >
          > Let's have another great year!
          >
          > - Michael C.
        • Felix Zaniboni
          As I like on the coast, it s a habit here to celebrate on the beach. Not to break our tradition, I always sent New Year`s at the beach also. This year I went
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 4, 2004
            As I like on the coast, it's a habit here to celebrate on the beach. Not to break our tradition, I always sent New Year`s at the beach also. This year I went to Itaparica Island which is an island close to Salvador (capital of Bahia). On the 2th I went to know Morro de Sao Paulo island (www.morrodesaopaulo.com.br). It was awesome. When I get there it was like I was fancing one of those Thailand`s pictures we can see on the internet. As soon as I have a picture scanned I will send to webheads.

            Felix

            Vance Stevens <vstevens@...> wrote:
            I've just got back from a New Year's day of surfing in the shadow of
            the Burg al Arab, the famous over-luxurious hotel in Dubai. The surf
            wasn't too bad, http://www.surfersofdubai.com I'll post a picture
            shortly, and I have a few balcony shots for Michael as soon as I can
            move all the pixels into cyberspace.

            By now most of you must have recovered from whatever you did New
            Year's Eve or New Years day. It would be interesting to learn what
            activities Webheads have been up to in so many parts of the world. I
            know that Yaodong for example was hosting a party at an Alado
            chatroom on New Year's Eve (couldn't get there from my office though,
            not supposed to drink at work anyway ;-)

            Michael asked earlier about Christmas letters. It was interesting to
            learn that the tradition was foreign to Michael. In my many years of
            working with English-speakers from all over the world I find many
            differences in our celebrations. Back in the 70s the notion of
            Halloween was foreign to many of my British neighbors in Saudi Arabia
            so my wife and I and one or two friends dressed up in costume and
            took our beer mugs door to door, saying trick or treat, and forcing
            them to give us a wee drop of whatever it was they'd been brewing
            before we would move off their doorstep (that's not exactly the way
            kids do it in the USA but as my neighbors weren't familiar with the
            tradition, we were able to adapt it slightly). By costume I don't
            mean what we Americans call bathing suits. Since then I've learned
            that Brits call what we were wearing 'fancy dress'.

            Two other traditions that Brits have at Christmas, which Americans
            don't, are Christmas "Crackers" and what the Brits call 'mime'
            shows. To an American, a mime show suggests an actor in white-face
            who doesn't speak during the performance. Christmas mimes have
            actors and audience talking back and forth to one another (example
            dialog: he did! No he didn't! Yes he did). I also heard on BBC the
            other day a segment about people in the UK starting to decorate their
            houses with lights and lawn objects the way Americans do. It is
            always a pleasure when in America to drive around neighborhoods on
            cold December nights in a warm car with family admiring the effort
            people have put into decorating their houses and brightening their
            neighborhoods.

            Americans and British share the tradition of exchanging cards at
            Christmas, but I think that Brits value more highly than we ever-
            practical Yanks the old-world personal touch of a hand-written
            letter. Americans these days are just as happy to send eGreetings.
            When desk-top publishing became popular, many families started
            creating what we sometimes call 'brag & gag' newsletters giving the
            family history for the past year. As Christmas is the time that many
            of us put into action our urge to communicate with friends at least
            once a year, these long letters might be found tucked into
            traditional cards or might be simply sent by email. I post mine on
            my website http://www.vancestevens.com/xmas2003.htm. From observing
            my British colleagues I find that I am likely to receive cards from
            them at the office and I appreciate the personal touch, the actual
            signature on the tangible card. But I also receive a lot of these
            long email letters from friends from all over at Christmas time. I
            was telling Michael that a lot of these friends happen to be
            Scandinavian.

            I hope in this new year we can revive some of the list traffic we
            have all enjoyed, with so many Webheads from around the world sharing
            experiences and customs with each other.

            Happy New Year everyone,

            Vance


            --- In efiwebheads@yahoogroups.com, Michael Coghlan <michaelc@c...>
            wrote:
            > 2.00 am in Australia, January 1st, 2004. Have just got home from a
            > wonderful New Year's party with old friends. And along with Aiden,
            I raise
            > a glass of champagne to us all!
            >
            > Let's have another great year!
            >
            > - Michael C.



            ---------------------------------
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            To visit your group on the web, go to:
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