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Re: Hi

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  • Joanie MacPhee
    yes.. .I have done that, and made acorn bread. There was an article on it in a very old national geographic, and maybe a chapter in one of Euel gibbons
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 12, 1999
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      yes..
      .I have done that, and made acorn bread.
      There was an article on it in a very old national geographic, and maybe a
      chapter in one of Euel gibbons' books.
      What kind of oaks do you have...red, white, black?
      it does make a difference..
      If you do not know, try to find out. what part of the country do you live
      in?
      Joanie



      >Is anyone out there?
      >
      >I've recently moved to a different part of the country and have a couple of
      acres of land with trees.
      >
      >I have oak trees and have been told that you can make flour from the
      acrons.
      >
      >Dan
      >
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    • Chantria@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 1/12/99 8:46:27 PM Central Standard Time, xdan@cablenet- ... Yes, you can. With a red oak, grind the acorns, wash it in water to leach out
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 12, 1999
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        In a message dated 1/12/99 8:46:27 PM Central Standard Time, xdan@cablenet-
        va.com writes:

        > I have oak trees and have been told that you can make flour from the acrons.

        Yes, you can. With a red oak, grind the acorns, wash it in water to leach out
        the tannins, the rinse and wash again, and repeat at least once more. Dry
        throroughly and powder it. For white oak, you roast the acorns, grind them,
        leach once, and then dry and powder.

        Oh, yes, I am Chantria, inhabitant of Oklahoma, and hopefully, someday
        botanist. Merry Meet.

        --Chantria
      • xdan@cablenet-va.com
        Is anyone out there? I ve recently moved to a different part of the country and have a couple of acres of land with trees. I have oak trees and have been told
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 12, 1999
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          Is anyone out there?

          I've recently moved to a different part of the country and have a couple of acres of land with trees.

          I have oak trees and have been told that you can make flour from the acrons.

          Dan
        • xdan
          I live in Virginia, near the West Virginia and the North Carolina border. Do you live in this part of the country? Don t know what kind of oaks. Have tons of
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 12, 1999
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            I live in Virginia, near the West Virginia and the North Carolina
            border.

            Do you live in this part of the country?

            Don't know what kind of oaks.
            Have tons of blackberries in the spring, and lots of weeds that I've
            never seen before.

            Thanks for the reply,
            Dan
          • Joanie MacPhee
            Ah...but when I did it with red oaks (in New England), I had to leach under running water for several days to get the tannins out! Joanie ... out
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 12, 1999
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              Ah...but when I did it with red oaks (in New England), I had to leach under
              running water for several days to get the tannins out!
              Joanie



              >
              >Yes, you can. With a red oak, grind the acorns, wash it in water to leach
              out
              >the tannins, the rinse and wash again, and repeat at least once more. Dry
              >throroughly and powder it. For white oak, you roast the acorns, grind them,
              >leach once, and then dry and powder.
              >
              >Oh, yes, I am Chantria, inhabitant of Oklahoma, and hopefully, someday
              >botanist. Merry Meet.
              >
              >--Chantria
              >
              >------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >To unsubscribe from this mailing list, or to change your subscription
              >to digest, go to the ONElist web site, at http://www.onelist.com and
              >select the User Center link from the menu bar on the left.
            • xdan
              Hi Chantria, Wow, 2 messages in one day thanks for the reply. I m just starting at living off of the land, canned some blackberries last year and am starting
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 12, 1999
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                Hi Chantria,

                Wow, 2 messages in one day thanks for the reply.

                I'm just starting at living off of the land, canned some blackberries
                last year and am starting to try to identify some of the weeds.

                Peace,
                Dan
              • Joanie MacPhee
                white oaks have quite light grey bark... red oaks have a deeper reddish brown bark. Blacks are close to reds, but not so red. Blacks and reds have pointed
                Message 7 of 8 , Jan 12, 1999
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                  white oaks have quite light grey bark...
                  red oaks have a deeper reddish brown bark. Blacks are close to reds, but
                  not so red.

                  Blacks and reds have pointed leaf lobes.
                  whiles have rounded leaf lobes.

                  white oak acorns take a year to develop, and are much more sweet, not so
                  much tannins

                  the others take 2 years to develop, and concentrate a higher amount of the
                  bitter tannins (which have been used to tan leather)

                  I am not really sure about the oaks that prevail in Virginia, though.
                  I have the symonds book on tree ID...that would give an idea, if I can find
                  it...maybe tomorrow I can check.

                  I live in Mass. on the NH border.

                  I got into making acorn bread when I was a student at MIT years ago, as I
                  just hated studying what I was SUPPOSED to be studying!

                  Joanie


                  >I live in Virginia, near the West Virginia and the North Carolina
                  >border.
                  >
                  >Do you live in this part of the country?
                  >
                  >Don't know what kind of oaks.
                  >Have tons of blackberries in the spring, and lots of weeds that I've
                  >never seen before.
                  >
                  >Thanks for the reply,
                  >Dan
                  >
                  >
                  >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  >To unsubscribe from this mailing list, or to change your subscription
                  >to digest, go to the ONElist web site, at http://www.onelist.com and
                  >select the User Center link from the menu bar on the left.
                  >
                • Joanie MacPhee
                  Lawrence Newcomb s book on wildflower ID is my favorite for plant ID in the east... I have another really neat photobook on weeds...again...I can look for my
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jan 12, 1999
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                    Lawrence Newcomb's book on wildflower ID is my favorite for plant ID in the
                    east...
                    I have another really neat photobook on weeds...again...I can look for my
                    books tomorrow!...
                    Joanie

                    >I'm just starting at living off of the land, canned some blackberries
                    >last year and am starting to try to identify some of the weeds.
                    >
                    >Peace,
                    >Dan
                    >
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