Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

social justice and the personal

Expand Messages
  • love2freedom@yahoo.com
    Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice. Justice at its best is love correcting everything that stands against love. These words by
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      "Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice.
      Justice at its best is love correcting everything that stands against
      love." These words by Martin Luther King are both challenging and
      stirring. We all know the way we can be moved by stories of those who
      are fighting for social justice in the name of love, Ghandi, Nelson
      Mandela, The Dalai Lama, Mother Teresa, Howard Zinn, Gloria Steinem to
      name a few. In the words of Barbara Love, "we all are born caring
      about those around us and wanting our community to be peaceful, loving
      and content." We naturally have empathy for the victims of injustice.
      We understand what it is to suffer and long to be loved and loving.
      But often we fall short, feeling overwhelmed and powerless and have
      doubts about the practicality of caring about human rights, justice or
      any of those lofty goals. It can seem quite distant to our daily lives
      in which we often have only room in our hearts for our own priorities,
      struggles and chores.

      In William Schultzs new book, In Our Own Best Interests, How Defending
      Human Rights Benefits Us All, the executive director of Amnesty
      International tries to tackle the question about the connection
      between those who are suffering from enormous injustice and those that
      are reasonably comfortable. He responds to the question asked on a
      radio show, ""But if I'm barely scratching out a living in East
      Tennessee, worried about having enough money to get my kids a decent
      education or to make payments on a bigger house, what difference do
      all these abuses taking place so far away make to me?" He starts with
      the argument of human empathy and continues with a complex discussion
      on economics, globalization, and the politics of our world, but then
      ends on the same note. "Ultimately I do not care why we staunch
      anothers suffering. Only that we do what we can to stop it. Only that
      we not remain indifferent. This book is a polemic against those who
      would cloak their indifference in the raiment of "interests." It is an
      appeal to Americans to judge their interests wisely...but it is meant
      as nothing more than a supplement to a much more abiding conviction:
      that if we would live in a world with honor, we must not let misery go
      unmet. A world worth keeping sleeps ill with the torn unmended."

      Judging my interests wisely had led me to leave eckankar permanently
      with gratitude for the "grist" of turning lessons into experiences and
      turning experiences into foundation. Thank you to man
    • seraphim279@yahoo.com
      ... against ... who ... to ... THANK YOU Leila! Extremely well expressed and presented! Peace and Growth -Larry ( Three Cheers and a Tiger for YOU! )
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In eckankartruth@y..., love2freedom@y... wrote:
        > "Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice.
        > Justice at its best is love correcting everything that stands
        against
        > love." These words by Martin Luther King are both challenging and
        > stirring. We all know the way we can be moved by stories of those
        who
        > are fighting for social justice in the name of love, Ghandi, Nelson
        > Mandela, The Dalai Lama, Mother Teresa, Howard Zinn, Gloria Steinem
        to
        > name a few.

        THANK YOU Leila! Extremely well expressed and presented!
        Peace and Growth
        -Larry ( Three Cheers and a Tiger for YOU! )
      • Sharon
        Hi Leila! I didn t comment on your excellent quotes & your whole post because, well...I m being lazy! But...thank you. BTW, are you familiar with the
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Leila!

          I didn't comment on your excellent quotes & your whole post because, well...I'm being lazy! <ggg>

          But...thank you. BTW, are you familiar with the economic theories of
          E.F. Schumacher? Check out his book "Small is Beautiful...Economics as if People Mattered."

          That was one of the many little things that bothered me at times in e-cult, the "teachings" about how the "social consciousness" was a waste of time, that earth was the way it was supposed to be, and "good deeds" were a waste of time; the only thing that mattered was "spiritual liberation", and of course, the only *true* way to do that was through membership in eckankar! If you wanted to be "helpful" to your fellow human beings, the best way to do that was to recruit them...if not in this life, well...you could at least work on them a bit & maybe they'd get it the next time around.

          I remember when I read in the Mystic World a suggestion that eckists adopt sections of highway for cleanup, so they'd get the cult's name on a roadsign. I got that "bad touch" feeling about it, but didn't know why. And you can be sure that the cult's food bank (or whatever) in MN is *solely* for the purpose of making the cult look good...although individual eckists may have the right motives. They're being used, and probably don't even know it.

          Okay...my short-term memory is bad, and I just skimmed through the posts following yours here, but someone wrote something about how can some guy with a family, etc., concern himself with "spiritual" stuff when he's too interested in taking care of his family? Or something like that...well, as I read it I thought, yes, this is Maslow's "Heirarchy of Needs". On the other hand, you know...it's often simple people who aren't caught up in materialism who truly appreciate God.
          (Whatever the heck God is.)

          I think it's important to care about your fellow human beings. Maybe that's because with three younger brothers, I learned to share. I remember I enjoyed it...I loved my little brothers (when we weren't fighting! <g>) and when I had anything "shareable" ... one example is Valentine cards from school, I *did* enjoy sharing with them!

          In the cult's "Initiate's Brochure" it tells members to do a good deed every day, even if it's only giving a stick of gum to someone...but it goes on to say that eventually, the member will learn that all they have to do is "hu" for people. I forget what chapter it's in, but somewhere in "Letters to a Chela" (http://www.delphi.com/eckankartruth), early twitch-discourses, he's even got that hilarious line about someone who's unable to give money (especially in their wills) or recruit new members can just lay in bed & "hu" and that will uplift savages in jungles. Geezus!!!!

          There's something wrong with that. I can't put my finger on it, but it's a way to turn a person's natural love for God & life in general inward, focused on the cult, and making them more open & susceptible to being controlled, and having their good heart-impulses perverted and twisted for the cult's purposes.


          You know, sometimes I wonder....just how much did Twitch have socked away in the bank for retirement? Gail *was* pretty shrewd, you know!

          Anyway...just some thoughts here.

          Hugs,

          Sharon
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.