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Re: Images of our own making

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  • tomleafeater
    It seems I can t spell. Correcting the title, for what its worth. There was once a painter who traveled into the cordillera in order to paint an invisible
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 30, 2007
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      It seems I can't spell. Correcting the title, for what its worth.

      "There was once a painter who traveled into the cordillera in order
      to paint an invisible picture of Christ. When he finished, the local
      Indians scrambled up the rocks to examine it and found that it was,
      in fact, a picture of Viracocha. A Chinaman passing by went up to
      see what it was that was causing such excitement and found to his
      surprise that on the rock was a picture of the Buddha. The painter
      stuck to his assertion that it was Christ who was invisibly
      portrayed, and a loud and rancorous argument developed. In the midst
      of the altercation one of the Indians noticed that the picture had
      erased itself.

      The truth is that the mountains are a place where you can find
      whatever you want just by looking, as long as you remember that they
      do not suffer fools gladly and particularly dislike those with
      preconceived ideas."

      -Louis de Bernieres, in The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts





      --- In eckankartruth@yahoogroups.com, "tomleafeater" <tianyue@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Reposting this after my first attempt apparently failed.
      >
      > "There was once a painter who traveled into the cordillera in order
      > to paint an invisible picture of Christ. When he finished, the
      local
      > Indians scrambled up the rocks to examine it and found that it was,
      > in fact, a picture of Viracocha. A Chinaman passing by went up to
      > see what it was that was causing such excitement and found to his
      > surprise that on the rock was a picture of the Buddha. The painter
      > stuck to his assertion that it was Christ who was invisibly
      > portrayed, and a loud and rancorous argument developed. In the
      midst
      > of the altercation one of the Indians noticed that the picture had
      > erased itself.
      >
      > The truth is that the mountains are a place where you can find
      > whatever you want just by looking, as long as you remember that
      they
      > do not suffer fools gladly and particularly dislike those with
      > preconceived ideas."
      >
      > -Louis de Bernieres, in The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts
      >
    • tygerpurr
      It s kind of like the power of Suggestion. We quite often see what we expect to see or what we have been conditioned to see, hear, feel. Also, it may simply be
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 2, 2007
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        It's kind of like the power of Suggestion. We quite often see what we
        expect to see or what we have been conditioned to see, hear, feel.
        Also, it may simply be wishful thinking or what we want based on
        denial of what really is. Children do this a lot as a way to cope. It
        is normal to do this, but in a Cult environment the members are
        encouraged to create a world that is unreal. When you leave the Cult,
        at first it is scary because all of this delusion starts to go blank,
        like the invisible picture. For myself, I learned a form of meditation
        that involves just letting go and observing the flow of thoughts and
        feelings, 'til they just dissolve and disappear and my mind and body
        go into a state of deep relaxation that feels very free and spontaneous.

        What Eckankult does in their "spiritual exercises" is the opposite of
        freedom. It is a practice in self-conditioning and an induced trance
        state based on preconceived Cult thinking, the worst of which is
        Harold Klemp's face as your object of devotion. Yuck!

        QUESTION AUTHORITY!!!

        Tygerpurr ; )

        --- In eckankartruth@yahoogroups.com, "tomleafeater" <tianyue@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        Re: Images of our own making


        It seems I can't spell. Correcting the title, for what its worth.

        "There was once a painter who traveled into the cordillera in order
        to paint an invisible picture of Christ. When he finished, the local
        Indians scrambled up the rocks to examine it and found that it was,
        in fact, a picture of Viracocha. A Chinaman passing by went up to
        see what it was that was causing such excitement and found to his
        surprise that on the rock was a picture of the Buddha. The painter
        stuck to his assertion that it was Christ who was invisibly
        portrayed, and a loud and rancorous argument developed. In the midst
        of the altercation one of the Indians noticed that the picture had
        erased itself.

        The truth is that the mountains are a place where you can find
        whatever you want just by looking, as long as you remember that they
        do not suffer fools gladly and particularly dislike those with
        preconceived ideas."

        -Louis de Bernieres, in The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts
      • tomleafeater
        ... we ... It ... Cult, ... blank, ... meditation ... spontaneous. ... of ... I agree, Tygerpurr! The way I tend to see this, the infinite no-thing is a blank
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 6, 2007
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          --- In eckankartruth@yahoogroups.com, tygerpurr <no_reply@...> wrote:
          >
          > It's kind of like the power of Suggestion. We quite often see what
          we
          > expect to see or what we have been conditioned to see, hear, feel.
          > Also, it may simply be wishful thinking or what we want based on
          > denial of what really is. Children do this a lot as a way to cope.
          It
          > is normal to do this, but in a Cult environment the members are
          > encouraged to create a world that is unreal. When you leave the
          Cult,
          > at first it is scary because all of this delusion starts to go
          blank,
          > like the invisible picture. For myself, I learned a form of
          meditation
          > that involves just letting go and observing the flow of thoughts and
          > feelings, 'til they just dissolve and disappear and my mind and body
          > go into a state of deep relaxation that feels very free and
          spontaneous.
          >
          > What Eckankult does in their "spiritual exercises" is the opposite
          of
          > freedom. It is a practice in self-conditioning and an induced trance
          > state based on preconceived Cult thinking, the worst of which is
          > Harold Klemp's face as your object of devotion. Yuck!
          >
          > QUESTION AUTHORITY!!!
          >
          > Tygerpurr ; )
          >


          I agree, Tygerpurr! The way I tend to see this, the infinite no-thing
          is a blank slate. We see in it what we want to see. And people are so
          certain that what they see is the only correct vision. They will go
          to war over such certainty, just as the fictional characters in this
          excerpt began to fight amongst themselves!

          Eckankar's vertical ladder of its value judgments regarding other
          religions, with itself at the top is illusory. More and more, I see
          instead a horizontal relationship between religions. In other words,
          religions might have at least some merit, and they all often have
          detrimental aspects that people should beware of, as well. They each
          can provide, maybe, a little piece of the puzzle (being generous
          here). I'll take a humble philosophy that doesn't lie over a
          grandiose one that lies through its miserable teeth any day, that is,
          if I choose any religion at all!

          But I don't at all agree with the vertical hierarchy that some
          teachings claim. What nonsense!

          And I do think that science has its place in the world. Reason and
          logic also can be useful, to state the obvious.

          And I agree, question authority!!!

          I hope all is well with you and family, Tygerpurr.

          Kent






          > --- In eckankartruth@yahoogroups.com, "tomleafeater" <tianyue@>
          wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > Re: Images of our own making
          >
          >
          > It seems I can't spell. Correcting the title, for what its worth.
          >
          > "There was once a painter who traveled into the cordillera in order
          > to paint an invisible picture of Christ. When he finished, the local
          > Indians scrambled up the rocks to examine it and found that it was,
          > in fact, a picture of Viracocha. A Chinaman passing by went up to
          > see what it was that was causing such excitement and found to his
          > surprise that on the rock was a picture of the Buddha. The painter
          > stuck to his assertion that it was Christ who was invisibly
          > portrayed, and a loud and rancorous argument developed. In the midst
          > of the altercation one of the Indians noticed that the picture had
          > erased itself.
          >
          > The truth is that the mountains are a place where you can find
          > whatever you want just by looking, as long as you remember that they
          > do not suffer fools gladly and particularly dislike those with
          > preconceived ideas."
          >
          > -Louis de Bernieres, in The War of Don Emmanuel's Nether Parts
          >
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