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[echocardiography] Technically Difficult Cardiac Ultrasound patients

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  • Thomas Kehoe
    I would appreciate any information that you can share with me on how to enhance my echo study in techncially diffcult patients. I am aware of 2nd harmonics
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 30, 1998
      I would appreciate any information that you can share with me on how to
      enhance my echo study in techncially diffcult patients. I am aware of 2nd
      harmonics and also Optison. I am looking for maneuvers that can be
      utilized seperately and or in conjunction with the above.

      Also if there are any reference material(s) that are specific to this topic
      I would also be indepted to you.

      Thank you in advance.


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    • Ajw60@aol.com
      Definitely patient positioning is very important. I have found that patients that are very thin, elderly, or have COPD usually have very diagnostic
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 1, 1998
        Definitely patient positioning is very important. I have found that patients
        that are very thin, elderly, or have COPD usually have very diagnostic
        subcoastal views and apical views. I usually do my measurements subcoastally
        with respiratory manuevers to optimize m-mode definition. By moving patients
        either in a steep left decubitus position or more supine you can definitely
        get a diagnostic study.

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      • Lisa Cardon
        Positioning the patient is crucial to obtain the best quality images. Also, try breathing the patient . Have them either hold their breath in or out, or take
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 3, 1998
          Positioning the patient is crucial to obtain the best quality images.
          Also, try 'breathing the patient'. Have them either hold their breath in or out, or take a small breath and hold it. I generally find that a combination of these techniques works (different ones for each view).
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