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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

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  • echomandan@aol.com
    Greetings Fellow Echocardiographers - This note goes out to everybody who scans, but my focus is on the veterans. I have been having issues with my scanning
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 4, 2006
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      Greetings Fellow Echocardiographers -
       
      This note goes out to everybody who scans, but my focus is on the veterans.  I have been having issues with my scanning hand, specifically numbness/tingling in my 4th and 5th fingers.  Cramping, twitching, spasms, and some atrophy are present.  Nerve conduction shows slowing across the left elbow (ulnar nerve). The diagnosis is "cubital tunnel syndrome".  I now wear an elbow pad while scanning.
       
      Has anybody else experienced this and, if so, what remedies did you take to correct the problem?  Surgical transposition of the ulnar nerve has been discussed, but I'd rather try more conservative treatment first.
       
      I have been scanning since 1985 ... dang near half my life.  (Go ahead, do the math!)
       
      Feel free to post here, or email me offline.  Any suggestions will be appreciated.
       
      Thanks...
       
      Dan Carlile, RDCS, FASE
       

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    • katie bittner
      hey dantheechoman, i had a general sonographer friend who had to wear a fake like arm because of this dx-she did have the surgery and completely improved!! she
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 4, 2006
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        hey dantheechoman,
        i had a general sonographer friend who had to wear a fake like arm because of this dx-she did have the surgery and completely improved!! she recommmends it,\i on the other hand have wrecked my back after scanning since 1984 and am having surgery in jan, 2007 after pain management and various other minimal corrections. my l;ast attempt at a pain free scan life.
        katie bitttner, rdcs,cct

        echomandan@... wrote:
        Greetings Fellow Echocardiographers -
         
        This note goes out to everybody who scans, but my focus is on the veterans.  I have been having issues with my scanning hand, specifically numbness/tingling in my 4th and 5th fingers.  Cramping, twitching, spasms, and some atrophy are present.  Nerve conduction shows slowing across the left elbow (ulnar nerve). The diagnosis is "cubital tunnel syndrome".  I now wear an elbow pad while scanning.
         
        Has anybody else experienced this and, if so, what remedies did you take to correct the problem?  Surgical transposition of the ulnar nerve has been discussed, but I'd rather try more conservative treatment first.
         
        I have been scanning since 1985 ... dang near half my life.  (Go ahead, do the math!)
         
        Feel free to post here, or email me offline.  Any suggestions will be appreciated.
         
        Thanks...
         
        Dan Carlile, RDCS, FASE
         

        Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from across the web, free AOL Mail and more.


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      • IamtheLadyK@aol.com
        Dan, I have been scanning for almost 12 years. One thing you can do is to switch hands. I have had those problems also and it has seemed to help. Another
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 4, 2006
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          Dan,
             I have been scanning for almost 12 years. One thing you can do is to switch hands.  I have had those problems also and it has seemed to help.  Another thing you can try is to make the transducer wider so that you dont have to make your grip so tight.
           
           
          Kathy Harrington, RDCS
          Navy Medical Center, Portsmouth, VA
        • Gerson Lichtenberg
          Dan, good to see you here but sorry to hear about the problem you are having. I m not familiar with this particular manifestation of repetitive stress problem,
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 5, 2006
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            Dan, good to see you here but sorry to hear about the
            problem you are having. I'm not familiar with this
            particular manifestation of repetitive stress problem,
            but you may want to visit soundergonomics.com or
            contact Joan Baker at that organization for further
            information.

            You have obviously gotten some professional help
            already, but one factor that I learned about a few
            years ago is that some of our problems are cumulative
            and are added to by strange things that do while
            asleep. I wear a wrist brace while sleeping to
            miminimize distortion and stress. This was recommended
            by an Occupational Therapist who came to watch me
            scan. This was provided by my employer.

            Another recommendation we have seen is to practice
            scanning right handed and then switch off to reduce
            stress.

            Good luck!

            Gerson Lichtenberg, RDCS
            Echo Lab Coordinator
            Mt. Sinai Hospital
            Chicago, Illinois

            --- echomandan@... wrote:

            > Greetings Fellow Echocardiographers - This note
            > goes out to everybody who scans, but my focus is on
            > the veterans. I have been having issues with my
            > scanning hand, specifically numbness/tingling in my
            > 4th and 5th fingers. Cramping, twitching, spasms,
            > and some atrophy are present. Nerve conduction shows
            > slowing across the left elbow (ulnar nerve). The
            > diagnosis is "cubital tunnel syndrome". I now wear
            > an elbow pad while scanning. Has anybody else
            > experienced this and, if so, what remedies did you
            > take to correct the problem? Surgical transposition
            > of the ulnar nerve has been discussed, but I'd
            > rather try more conservative treatment first.
            > I have been scanning since 1985 ... dang near
            > half my life. (Go ahead, do the math!) Feel free
            > to post here, or email me offline. Any suggestions
            > will be appreciated. Thanks... Dan Carlile,
            > RDCS, FASE EchoManDan@...
            >
            ________________________________________________________________________
            > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of
            > free safety and security tools, free access to
            > millions of high-quality videos from across the web,
            > free AOL Mail and more.
            >


            Gerson Lichtenberg, RDCS
            Echocardiography Coordinator
            Mt. Sinai Hospital
            Chicago, Illinois
          • abello4@bellsouth.net
            Hi Dan, I would give your hand a break. Force yourself to learn to scan with your other hand and take anti-inflamitants . Have you checked out your neck to
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 5, 2006
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              Hi Dan,
              I would give your hand a break. Force yourself to learn to scan with your other hand and take anti-inflamitants . Have you checked out your neck to make sure you do not have any spinal stenosis that can be causing or contributing to this?
              Anne


              >
              > From: echomandan@...
              > Date: 2006/12/04 Mon PM 01:50:47 EST
              > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [echocardiography] Cubital Tunnel Syndrome
              >
              > Greetings Fellow Echocardiographers - This note goes out to everybody who scans, but my focus is on the veterans. I have been having issues with my scanning hand, specifically numbness/tingling in my 4th and 5th fingers. Cramping, twitching, spasms, and some atrophy are present. Nerve conduction shows slowing across the left elbow (ulnar nerve). The diagnosis is "cubital tunnel syndrome". I now wear an elbow pad while scanning. Has anybody else experienced this and, if so, what remedies did you take to correct the problem? Surgical transposition of the ulnar nerve has been discussed, but I'd rather try more conservative treatment first.
              > I have been scanning since 1985 ... dang near half my life. (Go ahead, do the math!) Feel free to post here, or email me offline. Any suggestions will be appreciated. Thanks... Dan Carlile, RDCS, FASE EchoManDan@...
              > ________________________________________________________________________
              > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
              >
              >
            • Deb Hunt Soffer
              Dan Many of us feel for you. Another recommendation would be to check out Sound Ergonomics at soundergonomics.com. This is a company that specializes with
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 5, 2006
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                Dan
                    Many of us feel for you. Another recommendation would be to check out Sound Ergonomics at soundergonomics.com.
                    This is a company that specializes with helping with remedies in repetitive motion damage. Susan Murphey is the director of operations and a sonographer. Voice mail 206 417- 8151.
                 
                Deb Soffer
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, December 04, 2006 7:59 PM
                Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

                Dan,
                   I have been scanning for almost 12 years. One thing you can do is to switch hands.  I have had those problems also and it has seemed to help.  Another thing you can try is to make the transducer wider so that you dont have to make your grip so tight.
                 
                 
                Kathy Harrington, RDCS
                Navy Medical Center, Portsmouth, VA

              • Bhibby@comcast.net
                Katie, so sorry to hear that your new year will be starting out with surgery. Best of luck to you! Lots of good advice here--the only thing for me to add is
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 5, 2006
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                  Katie, so sorry to hear that your new year will be starting out with surgery.  Best of luck to you! 
                   
                  Lots of good advice here--the only thing for me to add is the avenue of relief I have taken and it has helped a lot.  I see my chiropractor and my acupuncturist as often as I can and get a massage at least once a month.  Something new that I have MADE myself do is get some exercise.  I invested in a stationary bike and I ride everyday.  What a difference in how I feel--really.  Especially with the cold weather it has been too cold and icey to walk outside so I now have an easy and convenient way to relieve stress. 
                   
                  Good luck to all of you who are struggling to work in pain and may you find the relief you need!
                  Barb Hibdon
                   
                  -------------- Original message --------------
                  From: katie bittner <rdcs1959@...>

                  hey dantheechoman,
                  i had a general sonographer friend who had to wear a fake like arm because of this dx-she did have the surgery and completely improved!! she recommmends it,\i on the other hand have wrecked my back after scanning since 1984 and am having surgery in jan, 2007 after pain management and various other minimal corrections. my l;ast attempt at a pain free scan life.
                  katie bitttner, rdcs,cct

                  echomandan@aol. com wrote:
                  Greetings Fellow Echocardiographers -
                   
                  This note goes out to everybody who scans, but my focus is on the veterans.  I have been having issues with my scanning hand, specifically numbness/tingling in my 4th and 5th fingers.  Cramping, twitching, spasms, and some atrophy are present.  Nerve conduction shows slowing across the left elbow (ulnar nerve). The diagnosis is "cubital tunnel syndrome".  I now wear an elbow pad while scanning.
                   
                  Has anybody else experienced this and, if so, what remedies did you take to correct the problem?  Surgical transposition of the ulnar nerve has been discussed, but I'd rather try more conservative treatment first.
                   
                  I have been scanning since 1985 ... dang near half my life.  (Go ahead, do the math!)
                   
                  Feel free to post here, or email me offline.  Any suggestions will be appreciated.
                   
                  Thanks...
                   
                  Dan Carlile, RDCS, FASE
                   

                  Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
                   


                  Want to start your own business? Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.

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