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Re: Thoughts about the RDCS........

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  • pdigrazi
    Well first, I thank everyone for their experience and thoughts on the RDCS. Hopefully I ll encounter a team that think along the same line as everyone here.
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 30, 2006
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      Well first, I thank everyone for their experience and thoughts on
      the RDCS. Hopefully I'll encounter a team that think along the same
      line as everyone here. It will make the environment a bit more
      easier to work in.


      As for tips and advice on physics.....Well, here is what I can offer.

      First, READ and CHECK OFF the ARDMS outline and make sure you
      understand the outline well.
      Second, YOU MUST KNOW that it is NOT just physics. i.e. 39% has to
      do with cardiac principles. So, even if you master physics, that
      will NOT give you a passing grade. You must know the rest of the
      stuff also. I guess I stress this because it was my mistake the
      first time around.
      Third, I was VERY happy with Dr. edelmans physics seminar, as well
      as with his text book. KNOW HIS MATERIAL WELL. Answer all the
      questions in the back of his text book and UNDERSTAND how you got
      the correct answer.

      In summary.....There is NO secret, Just the basics. know ARDMS
      outline and know the material well.

      Best wishes.

      --- In echocardiography@yahoogroups.com, "JENELLE TOMPKINS"
      <cvtmocha@...> wrote:
      >
      > Congrats on passing your physics portion of the RDCS exam. I am
      in the processing of studying myself, and I have been in the field a
      few years. Like you mention, having your license does not make you
      more better than someone eles, it may be able to open more
      opportunities for you, but eventually your work will carry you
      over. I agree with the other tech, that quality and a good team
      work approach is very important. So study hard to pass the second
      portion and hopefully I will be joining you, as a fellow license
      tech. P.S. Any tips on the physics portion of the exam. Was
      Edleman's workbook helpfully if you use his books?
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Ed Chait
      > Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:29 AM
      > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "pdigrazi" <pdigrazi@...>
      > To: <echocardiography@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 10:47 AM
      > Subject: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
      >
      >
      > I just passed the physics portion of my RDCS boards yesterday and
      > feel relieved. I now have the technology portion to take. On the
      > way home from the exam I asked myself what it all means to me. Now
      > that I'm on my way to getting registered, what does it really mean
      > to me?
      > I am still an entry level technologist, just having finished my
      > cardiovascular program in February of this year. I have done some
      > temp work a total of 3 weeks here and there, but I still can not
      say
      > that being registered really makes that much of a difference to be
      > without the concrete full-time experience, which is hard to find
      > here in NYC. There are many sonographers (some that I know) that
      are
      > NOT registered who know just as much as the cardiologist knows.
      > Please note that I don't want to seem as though the registry means
      > nothing at all, but it was just a thought that came to my mind
      > yesterday.
      >
      > I suppose what it really does mean to me is that I can go to any
      > hospital and present the supervisor with my RDCS in hopes of
      > conveying to them that if I studied this hard to pass the RDCS, I
      > may have the potential to learn what I'm taught and continue to
      grow
      > and be of value to the lab.
      >
      > Opinions are welcomed.
      >
      >
      > I can appreciate your thoughts on this and will relate mine.
      >
      > I worked as an echocardiography/vascular tech for over 20 years
      without any
      > license or credential. Not having my RDCS or RVT never really
      impeded me in
      > my career. I gained experience quickly early in my career due to
      working in
      > busy hospitals in Los Angeles. On the job interviews I would go
      to, I would
      > perform several echos and the quality of my work and experience
      seemed to be
      > what was weighed in regards to offering me whatever position I had
      applied
      > for.
      >
      > Like you have observed, I had seen techs with no credentialing
      perform
      > quality work and had also seen credentialed techs perform poor
      quality work,
      > so not having my license was not very important to me. My
      experience and
      > the quality of my work spoke for itself.
      >
      > What motivated me to finally take my RDCS and RVT exams after
      working very
      > successfully in the field for 25 years was that health care had
      moved in a
      > direction where employers had begun to *require* certification for
      many
      > positions and in some states (and probably in all states at some
      point)
      > Medicare would only reimburse for exams performed by licensed
      techs.
      >
      > I've worked too long in this field to believe that just because
      someone is
      > certified they can do good work, so if I interview someone for a
      position, I
      > have them perform several exams as was required of me. I place a
      lot more
      > value on the quality of their work than on their certification,
      but the fact
      > that they have certification is always a positive thing, and with
      the
      > Medicare reimbursement changes, this has also made licensing much
      more
      > important.
      > Of course, someone that has passed their exams gives an employer
      some
      > confidence in their having some basic knowledge, and this is also
      important,
      > although if you are interviewing with me, I'm going to be
      scrutinizing your
      > pictures and what you know, not your paperwork.
      >
      > If I had to take a position as a traveling tech, I would not want
      to be
      > restricted to working in only certain geographical areas, and I
      would like
      > to be as marketable and desirable as possible to any possible
      future
      > employer. I believe that gaining ICAEL accreditation also
      requires that at
      > least one tech performing exams be credentialed, so having a
      license is a
      > plus to any employer seeking to accredit their lab also.
      >
      > In any case, these are my thoughts on the matter.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > Ed Chait, RDCS, RVT
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
    • Jon
      Edelman s book is very helpful for passing the test. Know your cardiac as well for the physics, because that is 20% of the physics. As for the RDCS, it is
      Message 2 of 21 , Jun 30, 2006
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         Edelman's book is very helpful for passing the test.  Know your cardiac as well for the physics, because that is 20% of the physics.  As for the RDCS, it is EXTREMELY important to get credentialed, not because it will make you a better scanner, but because it lets everyone know that you are committed to your career, and that you are knowledgeable, and are not just a "picture taker".  It will also help you, when it is time to move on and up in the ranks especially since reimbursement will be tied to both registry and accreditation.  As a quick aside for those who don't think it is necessary or think it makes them a better tech; remember that every other person in the medical field has some form of credential and boards to take, and many of them can't work in the field until they have taken and passed the boards.  Why should we be any different?  We are in a very difficult field, and do a job that many people could never do.  We should be proud of our training, and credentials.  I know techs that have no credentials, and are outstanding and knowledgeable techs, and I know registered techs that couldn't scan their way out of a wet paper bag.  In the long run though, the registered tech will get the job interview, and even the promotion in many cases.  I also know people that have left the field, because they weren't good scanners, and will never be good, just because at the end of the day, you still have to have a special talent for the job.  Sorry for being so long winded.  Congratulations to all the techs that have their credentials, and for those that have passed part of their registry already.  Good luck to all those that are studying, and are going to take the boards.  Thank you all for being dedicated to the career, and want to keep on learning, growing and teaching the next generation.  Don't let anyone tell you that you are not special for what you do.
         
                        Jon Tagliaferri RDCS
                        National Ultrasound Education Manager
                        Siemens Medical Solutions
         
         
            
        -------Original Message-------
         
        Date: 06/30/06 16:38:44
        Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
         

        Congrats on passing your physics portion of the RDCS exam.  I am in the processing of studying myself, and I have been in the field a few years.  Like you mention, having your license does not make you more better than someone eles, it may be able to open more opportunities for you, but eventually your work will carry you over.  I agree with the other tech, that quality and a good team work approach is very important.  So study hard to pass the second portion and hopefully I will be joining you, as a fellow license tech.  P.S.  Any tips on the physics portion of the exam.  Was Edleman's workbook helpfully if you use his books?
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ed Chait
        Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:29 AM
        To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
         

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "pdigrazi" <pdigrazi@...>
        To: <echocardiography@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 10:47 AM
        Subject: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........


        I just passed the physics portion of my RDCS boards yesterday and
        feel relieved.  I now have the technology portion to take. On the
        way home from the exam I asked myself what it all means to me.  Now
        that I'm on my way to getting registered, what does it really mean
        to me?
        I am still an entry level technologist, just having finished my
        cardiovascular program in February of this year.  I have done some
        temp work a total of 3 weeks here and there, but I still can not say
        that being registered really makes that much of a difference to be
        without the concrete full-time experience, which is hard to find
        here in NYC. There are many sonographers (some that I know) that are
        NOT registered who know just as much as the cardiologist knows.
        Please note that I don't want to seem as though the registry means
        nothing at all, but it was just a thought that came to my mind
        yesterday.

        I suppose what it really does mean to me is that I can go to any
        hospital and present the supervisor with my RDCS in hopes of
        conveying to them that if I studied this hard to pass the RDCS, I
        may have the potential to learn what I'm taught and continue to grow
        and be of value to the lab.

        Opinions are welcomed.


        I can appreciate your thoughts on this and will relate mine.

        I worked as an echocardiography/vascular tech for over 20 years without any
        license or credential.  Not having my RDCS or RVT never really impeded me in
        my career.  I gained experience quickly early in my career due to working in
        busy hospitals in Los Angeles.  On the job interviews I would go to, I would
        perform several echos and the quality of my work and experience seemed to be
        what was weighed in regards to offering me whatever position I had applied
        for.

        Like you have observed, I had seen techs with no credentialing perform
        quality work and had also seen credentialed techs perform poor quality work,
        so not having my license was not very important to me.  My experience and
        the quality of my work spoke for itself.

        What motivated me to finally take my RDCS and RVT exams after working very
        successfully in the field for 25 years was that health care had moved in a
        direction where employers had begun to *require* certification for many
        positions and in some states (and probably in all states at some point)
        Medicare would only reimburse for exams performed by licensed techs.

        I've worked too long in this field to believe that just because someone is
        certified they can do good work, so if I interview someone for a position, I
        have them perform several exams as was required of me.  I place a lot more
        value on the quality of their work than on their certification, but the fact
        that they have certification is always a positive thing, and with the
        Medicare reimbursement changes, this has also made licensing much more
        important.
        Of course, someone that has passed their exams gives an employer some
        confidence in their having some basic knowledge, and this is also important,
        although if you are interviewing with me, I'm going to be scrutinizing your
        pictures and what you know, not your paperwork.

        If I had to take a position as a traveling tech, I would not want to be
        restricted to working in only certain geographical areas, and I would like
        to be as marketable and desirable as possible to any possible future
        employer.  I believe that gaining ICAEL accreditation also requires that at
        least one tech performing exams be credentialed, so having a license is a
        plus to any employer seeking to accredit their lab also.

        In any case, these are my thoughts on the matter.

        Regards,

        Ed Chait, RDCS, RVT






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      • rshado
        All It is important to have a clear understanding of the definition of what a credential is, and it s purpose. The purpose of the creation of a credentialing
        Message 3 of 21 , Jul 1, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          All

          It is important to have a clear understanding of the definition of
          what a credential is, and it's purpose.

          The purpose of the creation of a credentialing organization is not to
          define the quality of practice of anyone who obtains it, but
          to "protect the public". That's why such boards are formed and must
          follow strict guidelines by the federal government to do so. It is
          about ensuring a minumum standard of education has been successfully
          experienced through examination for anyone interacting within the
          scope of practice of that profession credentialed for. A "society"
          role is to educate, advocate, uphold, and form important guidelines
          and positions as to the practice of such individuals within that
          profession. We in echo are extraordinarily fortunate that we have the
          2nd largest cardiac society (ASE) in the world that is guided by both
          physicians and sonographers at every level.

          Just like "codes" for building houses, it only regulates "minimum",
          not what some might call appropriate for a specific test or
          institution. This is where experience or the quality of mentorship
          plays a role, and enable good sonographers to exist without
          credentialing. I know just as many as everyone else does, but I still
          want them credentialed, and this is why...


          A very real and important issue regarding cardiac sonographers is
          that somewhere along the process, baggage fell from the cart in
          ensuring that all sonographers became credentialed. This likely
          stemmed from the early cross-training of nurses or ECG techs early
          on, and then the insertion of the many military personnel who were
          cross-trained cardio-pulmonary/xray techs who had a logical knowledge
          base for what finally became 2D echo from M-mode. This is how a lot
          of ultrasound, having nothing to do with irradiation, became under
          the auspice of radiology, where all medical imaging was performed
          then, including cardiac catheterization.

          In the entire world of medicine, and most other technical professions
          for that matter, we few, we lucky few, are the ONLY medical
          professionals who comprise a large workforce in the United States,
          yet do not hold a required and usually licensed credential for each
          and every person performing that craft. RN, RRT, RTR, LPN, PA,
          NP...Look at every person around you in the hospital and realize
          that. This of course is beginning to change.

          Currently, less qualified outside or rural clinics may cross-train
          just about anyone and start performing echoes in the office that many
          of us may repeat time and time again because of the poor diagnostic
          quality. Yet, they receive the same reimbursement/profit that the
          higher cost cardiology clinic receives, who pay more for space,
          better quality machines, and much higher salaried credentialed
          echocardigraphers. Conversely, most hospitals have actually
          maintained a firmer level of didactic requirements, requiring either
          some other degree or credentialing by ARDMS or CCI.

          This environment has increased scrutiny by payors, CMS, and just
          about anyone else involved as to the immense number of echoes
          performed. Scrutiny of their actual diagnostic value (outcomes), the
          quality of both those doing them and those interpreting them. This is
          likely to lead to required RDCS/RCS/AscExam(MD)credentialing and/or
          ICAEL accreditation for reimbursement of certain procedures in and
          out of the hospitals somewhere down the road, at least in MY opinion.
          In some states, this has already been intitiated.

          CMS has echo on their "radar" as we speak, and are looking at every
          aspect of how and why echocardiography is performed, and where the
          newer technologies may lead to or replace other ones. The new
          proposed changes in reimbursements reflect this.

          So my long winded point is simply; having the RDCS/RCS credential
          does not guarantee you love your work, or have a great scanning hand,
          or push yourself everyday to excel. What is does prove is you met a
          minimum level of education critical to the performance, passed
          examination, promote the profession, recieve ongoing continuing
          education, and are the most likely to excel in the future because you
          were willing to dedicate yourself enough to become credentialed in
          the first place. In some cases, you did it to keep your job. Kudos
          regardless, the reasons don't matter.

          The best way to protect our patients and ourselves as professionals
          from outside forces is not judge one another, but support one another
          and become credentialed cardiac sonographers.

          This is the key to controlling our professional integrity and prepare
          for a future of higher and higher technology as it applies to
          echocardiography.

          So get on with it. Email me if I can help.

          Rick Meece, RDCS, RCS, FASE
        • robkat93@adelphia.net
          i agree with the simple point.....that RDCS or RCS is a **minimum** standard from which to work as an Echocardiographer or Cardiac Sonographer. it is difficult
          Message 4 of 21 , Jul 2, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            i agree with the simple point.....that RDCS or RCS is a **minimum** standard from which to work as an Echocardiographer or Cardiac Sonographer. it is difficult to create/maintain/grow a profession that does not at least recognize the common starting point for employment and success in this field. it is also very hard to know......when is the appropriate time to draw a line.......with so many in the field in various stages of training or expertise quite often....such that it seems arbitrary to demand a credential on the spot. we have to start somewhere.....and no time like the present.....to agree on a minimum standard. the RDCS or RCS do not speak for everything......but they give us a foundation.....that is universal.

            robin


            ---- rshado <rshado@...> wrote:
            > All
            >
            > It is important to have a clear understanding of the definition of
            > what a credential is, and it's purpose.
            >
            > The purpose of the creation of a credentialing organization is not to
            > define the quality of practice of anyone who obtains it, but
            > to "protect the public". That's why such boards are formed and must
            > follow strict guidelines by the federal government to do so. It is
            > about ensuring a minumum standard of education has been successfully
            > experienced through examination for anyone interacting within the
            > scope of practice of that profession credentialed for. A "society"
            > role is to educate, advocate, uphold, and form important guidelines
            > and positions as to the practice of such individuals within that
            > profession. We in echo are extraordinarily fortunate that we have the
            > 2nd largest cardiac society (ASE) in the world that is guided by both
            > physicians and sonographers at every level.
            >
            > Just like "codes" for building houses, it only regulates "minimum",
            > not what some might call appropriate for a specific test or
            > institution. This is where experience or the quality of mentorship
            > plays a role, and enable good sonographers to exist without
            > credentialing. I know just as many as everyone else does, but I still
            > want them credentialed, and this is why...
            >
            >
            > A very real and important issue regarding cardiac sonographers is
            > that somewhere along the process, baggage fell from the cart in
            > ensuring that all sonographers became credentialed. This likely
            > stemmed from the early cross-training of nurses or ECG techs early
            > on, and then the insertion of the many military personnel who were
            > cross-trained cardio-pulmonary/xray techs who had a logical knowledge
            > base for what finally became 2D echo from M-mode. This is how a lot
            > of ultrasound, having nothing to do with irradiation, became under
            > the auspice of radiology, where all medical imaging was performed
            > then, including cardiac catheterization.
            >
            > In the entire world of medicine, and most other technical professions
            > for that matter, we few, we lucky few, are the ONLY medical
            > professionals who comprise a large workforce in the United States,
            > yet do not hold a required and usually licensed credential for each
            > and every person performing that craft. RN, RRT, RTR, LPN, PA,
            > NP...Look at every person around you in the hospital and realize
            > that. This of course is beginning to change.
            >
            > Currently, less qualified outside or rural clinics may cross-train
            > just about anyone and start performing echoes in the office that many
            > of us may repeat time and time again because of the poor diagnostic
            > quality. Yet, they receive the same reimbursement/profit that the
            > higher cost cardiology clinic receives, who pay more for space,
            > better quality machines, and much higher salaried credentialed
            > echocardigraphers. Conversely, most hospitals have actually
            > maintained a firmer level of didactic requirements, requiring either
            > some other degree or credentialing by ARDMS or CCI.
            >
            > This environment has increased scrutiny by payors, CMS, and just
            > about anyone else involved as to the immense number of echoes
            > performed. Scrutiny of their actual diagnostic value (outcomes), the
            > quality of both those doing them and those interpreting them. This is
            > likely to lead to required RDCS/RCS/AscExam(MD)credentialing and/or
            > ICAEL accreditation for reimbursement of certain procedures in and
            > out of the hospitals somewhere down the road, at least in MY opinion.
            > In some states, this has already been intitiated.
            >
            > CMS has echo on their "radar" as we speak, and are looking at every
            > aspect of how and why echocardiography is performed, and where the
            > newer technologies may lead to or replace other ones. The new
            > proposed changes in reimbursements reflect this.
            >
            > So my long winded point is simply; having the RDCS/RCS credential
            > does not guarantee you love your work, or have a great scanning hand,
            > or push yourself everyday to excel. What is does prove is you met a
            > minimum level of education critical to the performance, passed
            > examination, promote the profession, recieve ongoing continuing
            > education, and are the most likely to excel in the future because you
            > were willing to dedicate yourself enough to become credentialed in
            > the first place. In some cases, you did it to keep your job. Kudos
            > regardless, the reasons don't matter.
            >
            > The best way to protect our patients and ourselves as professionals
            > from outside forces is not judge one another, but support one another
            > and become credentialed cardiac sonographers.
            >
            > This is the key to controlling our professional integrity and prepare
            > for a future of higher and higher technology as it applies to
            > echocardiography.
            >
            > So get on with it. Email me if I can help.
            >
            > Rick Meece, RDCS, RCS, FASE
            >
            >
            >
          • Brenda King
            Thanks for you tips of the ARDMS outline. I have been doing echo for approx. 8 yrs with on the job training only. About 5 yrs ago i took the adult echo
            Message 5 of 21 , Jul 4, 2006
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              Thanks for you tips of the ARDMS outline. I have been doing echo for approx.
              8 yrs with on the job training only. About 5 yrs ago i took the adult echo
              (twice) and passed it and have since taken the physics 3 times missing it by
              2 and 3 points. Iam in my 30 day waiting period to apply again.
              I did attend Edelmans review and picked up alot but not enough. I will agree
              that his review is wonderful but i can't help feel that its more to
              reiterate what you've learned in school and you need more indepth overall
              information to totally understand and grasp his outline.
              I will be the only tech, other than our traveling tech to be registered
              which makes asking and confirming any questions i have almost impossible, i
              generally only see the RDCS once a week or less.
              Becoming registered is not about the money for me especially because iam
              self teaching, its about loving my job and being given (ojt) when i
              couldn't go to school and my personal gratification to say i accomplished
              this being the biggest of my life and i'll be the first of our lab. After
              failing by 3 points this last time i criied all the way home and had decided
              not to put myself through it again. As i said its not about the money in
              fact its not even been discussed. But i cann't stop there, i've read some of
              the pointers in this group and plan to pursue and pass the physics. Thanks
              for all tips.


              BK



              >From: "pdigrazi" <pdigrazi@...>
              >Reply-To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
              >To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [echocardiography] Re: Thoughts about the RDCS........
              >Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2006 23:34:28 -0000
              >
              >Well first, I thank everyone for their experience and thoughts on
              >the RDCS. Hopefully I'll encounter a team that think along the same
              >line as everyone here. It will make the environment a bit more
              >easier to work in.
              >
              >
              >As for tips and advice on physics.....Well, here is what I can offer.
              >
              >First, READ and CHECK OFF the ARDMS outline and make sure you
              >understand the outline well.
              >Second, YOU MUST KNOW that it is NOT just physics. i.e. 39% has to
              >do with cardiac principles. So, even if you master physics, that
              >will NOT give you a passing grade. You must know the rest of the
              >stuff also. I guess I stress this because it was my mistake the
              >first time around.
              >Third, I was VERY happy with Dr. edelmans physics seminar, as well
              >as with his text book. KNOW HIS MATERIAL WELL. Answer all the
              >questions in the back of his text book and UNDERSTAND how you got
              >the correct answer.
              >
              >In summary.....There is NO secret, Just the basics. know ARDMS
              >outline and know the material well.
              >
              >Best wishes.
              >
              >--- In echocardiography@yahoogroups.com, "JENELLE TOMPKINS"
              ><cvtmocha@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Congrats on passing your physics portion of the RDCS exam. I am
              >in the processing of studying myself, and I have been in the field a
              >few years. Like you mention, having your license does not make you
              >more better than someone eles, it may be able to open more
              >opportunities for you, but eventually your work will carry you
              >over. I agree with the other tech, that quality and a good team
              >work approach is very important. So study hard to pass the second
              >portion and hopefully I will be joining you, as a fellow license
              >tech. P.S. Any tips on the physics portion of the exam. Was
              >Edleman's workbook helpfully if you use his books?
              > >
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > From: Ed Chait
              > > Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:29 AM
              > > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
              > > Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
              > >
              > >
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > From: "pdigrazi" <pdigrazi@...>
              > > To: <echocardiography@yahoogroups.com>
              > > Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 10:47 AM
              > > Subject: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
              > >
              > >
              > > I just passed the physics portion of my RDCS boards yesterday and
              > > feel relieved. I now have the technology portion to take. On the
              > > way home from the exam I asked myself what it all means to me. Now
              > > that I'm on my way to getting registered, what does it really mean
              > > to me?
              > > I am still an entry level technologist, just having finished my
              > > cardiovascular program in February of this year. I have done some
              > > temp work a total of 3 weeks here and there, but I still can not
              >say
              > > that being registered really makes that much of a difference to be
              > > without the concrete full-time experience, which is hard to find
              > > here in NYC. There are many sonographers (some that I know) that
              >are
              > > NOT registered who know just as much as the cardiologist knows.
              > > Please note that I don't want to seem as though the registry means
              > > nothing at all, but it was just a thought that came to my mind
              > > yesterday.
              > >
              > > I suppose what it really does mean to me is that I can go to any
              > > hospital and present the supervisor with my RDCS in hopes of
              > > conveying to them that if I studied this hard to pass the RDCS, I
              > > may have the potential to learn what I'm taught and continue to
              >grow
              > > and be of value to the lab.
              > >
              > > Opinions are welcomed.
              > >
              > >
              > > I can appreciate your thoughts on this and will relate mine.
              > >
              > > I worked as an echocardiography/vascular tech for over 20 years
              >without any
              > > license or credential. Not having my RDCS or RVT never really
              >impeded me in
              > > my career. I gained experience quickly early in my career due to
              >working in
              > > busy hospitals in Los Angeles. On the job interviews I would go
              >to, I would
              > > perform several echos and the quality of my work and experience
              >seemed to be
              > > what was weighed in regards to offering me whatever position I had
              >applied
              > > for.
              > >
              > > Like you have observed, I had seen techs with no credentialing
              >perform
              > > quality work and had also seen credentialed techs perform poor
              >quality work,
              > > so not having my license was not very important to me. My
              >experience and
              > > the quality of my work spoke for itself.
              > >
              > > What motivated me to finally take my RDCS and RVT exams after
              >working very
              > > successfully in the field for 25 years was that health care had
              >moved in a
              > > direction where employers had begun to *require* certification for
              >many
              > > positions and in some states (and probably in all states at some
              >point)
              > > Medicare would only reimburse for exams performed by licensed
              >techs.
              > >
              > > I've worked too long in this field to believe that just because
              >someone is
              > > certified they can do good work, so if I interview someone for a
              >position, I
              > > have them perform several exams as was required of me. I place a
              >lot more
              > > value on the quality of their work than on their certification,
              >but the fact
              > > that they have certification is always a positive thing, and with
              >the
              > > Medicare reimbursement changes, this has also made licensing much
              >more
              > > important.
              > > Of course, someone that has passed their exams gives an employer
              >some
              > > confidence in their having some basic knowledge, and this is also
              >important,
              > > although if you are interviewing with me, I'm going to be
              >scrutinizing your
              > > pictures and what you know, not your paperwork.
              > >
              > > If I had to take a position as a traveling tech, I would not want
              >to be
              > > restricted to working in only certain geographical areas, and I
              >would like
              > > to be as marketable and desirable as possible to any possible
              >future
              > > employer. I believe that gaining ICAEL accreditation also
              >requires that at
              > > least one tech performing exams be credentialed, so having a
              >license is a
              > > plus to any employer seeking to accredit their lab also.
              > >
              > > In any case, these are my thoughts on the matter.
              > >
              > > Regards,
              > >
              > > Ed Chait, RDCS, RVT
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >

              _________________________________________________________________
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            • a b
              which makes asking and confirming any questions i have almost impossible Ask us! You probably won t get your answers immediately, but surely within a day or
              Message 6 of 21 , Jul 6, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                "which makes asking and confirming any questions i have almost
                impossible"
                 
                Ask us!  You probably won't get your answers immediately, but surely within a day or so.  Keep a list and ask away.  I'd be pleased to help out. 
                 


                Brenda King <bkbroiler40@...> wrote:
                Thanks for you tips of the ARDMS outline. I have been doing echo for approx.
                8 yrs with on the job training only. About 5 yrs ago i took the adult echo
                (twice) and passed it and have since taken the physics 3 times missing it by
                2 and 3 points. Iam in my 30 day waiting period to apply again.
                I did attend Edelmans review and picked up alot but not enough. I will agree
                that his review is wonderful but i can't help feel that its more to
                reiterate what you've learned in school and you need more indepth overall
                information to totally understand and grasp his outline.
                I will be the only tech, other than our traveling tech to be registered
                which makes asking and confirming any questions i have almost impossible, i
                generally only see the RDCS once a week or less.
                Becoming registered is not about the money for me especially because iam
                self teaching, its about loving my job and being given (ojt) when i
                couldn't go to school and my personal gratification to say i accomplished
                this being the biggest of my life and i'll be the first of our lab. After
                failing by 3 points this last time i criied all the way home and had decided
                not to put myself through it again. As i said its not about the money in
                fact its not even been discussed. But i cann't stop there, i've read some of
                the pointers in this group and plan to pursue and pass the physics. Thanks
                for all tips.


                BK



                >From: "pdigrazi"
                >Reply-To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                >To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: [echocardiography] Re: Thoughts about the RDCS........
                >Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2006 23:34:28 -0000
                >
                >Well first, I thank everyone for their experience and thoughts on
                >the RDCS. Hopefully I'll encounter a team that think along the same
                >line as everyone here. It will make the environment a bit more
                >easier to work in.
                >
                >
                >As for tips and advice on physics.....Well, here is what I can offer.
                >
                >First, READ and CHECK OFF the ARDMS outline and make sure you
                >understand the outline well.
                >Second, YOU MUST KNOW that it is NOT just physics. i.e. 39% has to
                >do with cardiac principles. So, even if you master physics, that
                >will NOT give you a passing grade. You must know the rest of the
                >stuff also. I guess I stress this because it was my mistake the
                >first time around.
                >Third, I was VERY happy with Dr. edelmans physics seminar, as well
                >as with his text book. KNOW HIS MATERIAL WELL. Answer all the
                >questions in the back of his text book and UNDERSTAND how you got
                >the correct answer.
                >
                >In summary.....There is NO secret, Just the basics. know ARDMS
                >outline and know the material well.
                >
                >Best wishes.
                >
                >--- In echocardiography@yahoogroups.com, "JENELLE TOMPKINS"
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > Congrats on passing your physics portion of the RDCS exam. I am
                >in the processing of studying myself, and I have been in the field a
                >few years. Like you mention, having your license does not make you
                >more better than someone eles, it may be able to open more
                >opportunities for you, but eventually your work will carry you
                >over. I agree with the other tech, that quality and a good team
                >work approach is very important. So study hard to pass the second
                >portion and hopefully I will be joining you, as a fellow license
                >tech. P.S. Any tips on the physics portion of the exam. Was
                >Edleman's workbook helpfully if you use his books?
                > >
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: Ed Chait
                > > Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:29 AM
                > > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                > > Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
                > >
                > >
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: "pdigrazi"
                > > To:
                > > Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 10:47 AM
                > > Subject: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
                > >
                > >
                > > I just passed the physics portion of my RDCS boards yesterday and
                > > feel relieved. I now have the technology portion to take. On the
                > > way home from the exam I asked myself what it all means to me. Now
                > > that I'm on my way to getting registered, what does it really mean
                > > to me?
                > > I am still an entry level technologist, just having finished my
                > > cardiovascular program in February of this year. I have done some
                > > temp work a total of 3 weeks here and there, but I still can not
                >say
                > > that being registered really makes that much of a difference to be
                > > without the concrete full-time experience, which is hard to find
                > > here in NYC. There are many sonographers (some that I know) that
                >are
                > > NOT registered who know just as much as the cardiologist knows.
                > > Please note that I don't want to seem as though the registry means
                > > nothing at all, but it was just a thought that came to my mind
                > > yesterday.
                > >
                > > I suppose what it really does mean to me is that I can go to any
                > > hospital and present the supervisor with my RDCS in hopes of
                > > conveying to them that if I studied this hard to pass the RDCS, I
                > > may have the potential to learn what I'm taught and continue to
                >grow
                > > and be of value to the lab.
                > >
                > > Opinions are welcomed.
                > >
                > >
                > > I can appreciate your thoughts on this and will relate mine.
                > >
                > > I worked as an echocardiography/vascular tech for over 20 years
                >without any
                > > license or credential. Not having my RDCS or RVT never really
                >impeded me in
                > > my career. I gained experience quickly early in my career due to
                >working in
                > > busy hospitals in Los Angeles. On the job interviews I would go
                >to, I would
                > > perform several echos and the quality of my work and experience
                >seemed to be
                > > what was weighed in regards to offering me whatever position I had
                >applied
                > > for.
                > >
                > > Like you have observed, I had seen techs with no credentialing
                >perform
                > > quality work and had also seen credentialed techs perform poor
                >quality work,
                > > so not having my license was not very important to me. My
                >experience and
                > > the quality of my work spoke for itself.
                > >
                > > What motivated me to finally take my RDCS and RVT exams after
                >working very
                > > successfully in the field for 25 years was that health care had
                >moved in a
                > > direction where employers had begun to *require* certification for
                >many
                > > positions and in some states (and probably in all states at some
                >point)
                > > Medicare would only reimburse for exams performed by licensed
                >techs.
                > >
                > > I've worked too long in this field to believe that just because
                >someone is
                > > certified they can do good work, so if I interview someone for a
                >position, I
                > > have them perform several exams as was required of me. I place a
                >lot more
                > > value on the quality of their work than on their certification,
                >but the fact
                > > that they have certification is always a positive thing, and with
                >the
                > > Medicare reimbursement changes, this has also made licensing much
                >more
                > > important.
                > > Of course, someone that has passed their exams gives an employer
                >some
                > > confidence in their having some basic knowledge, and this is also
                >important,
                > > although if you are interviewing with me, I'm going to be
                >scrutinizing your
                > > pictures and what you know, not your paperwork.
                > >
                > > If I had to take a position as a traveling tech, I would not want
                >to be
                > > restricted to working in only certain geographical areas, and I
                >would like
                > > to be as marketable and desirable as possible to any possible
                >future
                > > employer. I believe that gaining ICAEL accreditation also
                >requires that at
                > > least one tech performing exams be credentialed, so having a
                >license is a
                > > plus to any employer seeking to accredit their lab also.
                > >
                > > In any case, these are my thoughts on the matter.
                > >
                > > Regards,
                > >
                > > Ed Chait, RDCS, RVT
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

                _________________________________________________________________
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                Yahoo! Groups Links

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                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/echocardiography/

                <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                echocardiography-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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              • rshado
                There are many great tips here as it is, and I as well fully endorse Dr. Edelman s program and workbook, remembering that David Adams workbook with the
                Message 7 of 21 , Jul 7, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  There are many great tips here as it is, and I as well fully endorse
                  Dr. Edelman's program and workbook, remembering that David Adams
                  workbook with the Cardiovascular Science is also a bit bite of the
                  Physics Exam. Study the CV matrix carefully, and brush up on the
                  ECG, ischemia, CAD, etc.

                  I have had a number of people say they also used Sid's "Ultrasound
                  Physics" textbook as a tool for getting a more solid foundation for
                  learning the more "efficient" presentation in the workbook. It is a
                  great book.

                  Other than that, get a good nights sleep the night before the exam,
                  and keep candy in your pocket to keep your glucose up.

                  Last, every exam I take, I go over all the questions until there is
                  no time left. I never agonize over the gut feeling answers I wasn't
                  completely sure of,(gut instinct is often correct) but I have found
                  flat out wrong answers that I could not believe I picked the first
                  go around. Sometimes the memory and clarity gets a little better as
                  you progress through the exam. Don't waste valuable time in a rush
                  to get to the end and see the results. They will be waiting for you
                  all too quickly!

                  I bet the next time you will nail it, so enjoy the journey and good
                  luck!

                  Rick Meece, RDCS, RCS, FASE


                  --- In echocardiography@yahoogroups.com, "Brenda King"
                  <bkbroiler40@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks for you tips of the ARDMS outline. I have been doing echo
                  for approx.
                  > 8 yrs with on the job training only. About 5 yrs ago i took the
                  adult echo
                  > (twice) and passed it and have since taken the physics 3 times
                  missing it by
                  > 2 and 3 points. Iam in my 30 day waiting period to apply again.
                  > I did attend Edelmans review and picked up alot but not enough. I
                  will agree
                  > that his review is wonderful but i can't help feel that its more
                  to
                  > reiterate what you've learned in school and you need more indepth
                  overall
                  > information to totally understand and grasp his outline.
                  > I will be the only tech, other than our traveling tech to be
                  registered
                  > which makes asking and confirming any questions i have almost
                  impossible, i
                  > generally only see the RDCS once a week or less.
                  > Becoming registered is not about the money for me especially
                  because iam
                  > self teaching, its about loving my job and being given (ojt) when
                  i
                  > couldn't go to school and my personal gratification to say i
                  accomplished
                  > this being the biggest of my life and i'll be the first of our
                  lab. After
                  > failing by 3 points this last time i criied all the way home and
                  had decided
                  > not to put myself through it again. As i said its not about the
                  money in
                  > fact its not even been discussed. But i cann't stop there, i've
                  read some of
                  > the pointers in this group and plan to pursue and pass the
                  physics. Thanks
                  > for all tips.
                  >
                  >
                  > BK
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > >From: "pdigrazi" <pdigrazi@...>
                  > >Reply-To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                  > >To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                  > >Subject: [echocardiography] Re: Thoughts about the RDCS........
                  > >Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2006 23:34:28 -0000
                  > >
                  > >Well first, I thank everyone for their experience and thoughts on
                  > >the RDCS. Hopefully I'll encounter a team that think along the
                  same
                  > >line as everyone here. It will make the environment a bit more
                  > >easier to work in.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >As for tips and advice on physics.....Well, here is what I can
                  offer.
                  > >
                  > >First, READ and CHECK OFF the ARDMS outline and make sure you
                  > >understand the outline well.
                  > >Second, YOU MUST KNOW that it is NOT just physics. i.e. 39% has
                  to
                  > >do with cardiac principles. So, even if you master physics, that
                  > >will NOT give you a passing grade. You must know the rest of the
                  > >stuff also. I guess I stress this because it was my mistake the
                  > >first time around.
                  > >Third, I was VERY happy with Dr. edelmans physics seminar, as well
                  > >as with his text book. KNOW HIS MATERIAL WELL. Answer all the
                  > >questions in the back of his text book and UNDERSTAND how you got
                  > >the correct answer.
                  > >
                  > >In summary.....There is NO secret, Just the basics. know ARDMS
                  > >outline and know the material well.
                  > >
                  > >Best wishes.
                  > >
                  > >--- In echocardiography@yahoogroups.com, "JENELLE TOMPKINS"
                  > ><cvtmocha@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Congrats on passing your physics portion of the RDCS exam. I
                  am
                  > >in the processing of studying myself, and I have been in the
                  field a
                  > >few years. Like you mention, having your license does not make
                  you
                  > >more better than someone eles, it may be able to open more
                  > >opportunities for you, but eventually your work will carry you
                  > >over. I agree with the other tech, that quality and a good team
                  > >work approach is very important. So study hard to pass the second
                  > >portion and hopefully I will be joining you, as a fellow license
                  > >tech. P.S. Any tips on the physics portion of the exam. Was
                  > >Edleman's workbook helpfully if you use his books?
                  > > >
                  > > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > > From: Ed Chait
                  > > > Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:29 AM
                  > > > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > > From: "pdigrazi" <pdigrazi@>
                  > > > To: <echocardiography@yahoogroups.com>
                  > > > Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 10:47 AM
                  > > > Subject: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > I just passed the physics portion of my RDCS boards yesterday
                  and
                  > > > feel relieved. I now have the technology portion to take. On
                  the
                  > > > way home from the exam I asked myself what it all means to
                  me. Now
                  > > > that I'm on my way to getting registered, what does it really
                  mean
                  > > > to me?
                  > > > I am still an entry level technologist, just having finished my
                  > > > cardiovascular program in February of this year. I have done
                  some
                  > > > temp work a total of 3 weeks here and there, but I still can
                  not
                  > >say
                  > > > that being registered really makes that much of a difference
                  to be
                  > > > without the concrete full-time experience, which is hard to
                  find
                  > > > here in NYC. There are many sonographers (some that I know)
                  that
                  > >are
                  > > > NOT registered who know just as much as the cardiologist knows.
                  > > > Please note that I don't want to seem as though the registry
                  means
                  > > > nothing at all, but it was just a thought that came to my mind
                  > > > yesterday.
                  > > >
                  > > > I suppose what it really does mean to me is that I can go to
                  any
                  > > > hospital and present the supervisor with my RDCS in hopes of
                  > > > conveying to them that if I studied this hard to pass the
                  RDCS, I
                  > > > may have the potential to learn what I'm taught and continue to
                  > >grow
                  > > > and be of value to the lab.
                  > > >
                  > > > Opinions are welcomed.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > I can appreciate your thoughts on this and will relate mine.
                  > > >
                  > > > I worked as an echocardiography/vascular tech for over 20 years
                  > >without any
                  > > > license or credential. Not having my RDCS or RVT never really
                  > >impeded me in
                  > > > my career. I gained experience quickly early in my career due
                  to
                  > >working in
                  > > > busy hospitals in Los Angeles. On the job interviews I would
                  go
                  > >to, I would
                  > > > perform several echos and the quality of my work and experience
                  > >seemed to be
                  > > > what was weighed in regards to offering me whatever position I
                  had
                  > >applied
                  > > > for.
                  > > >
                  > > > Like you have observed, I had seen techs with no credentialing
                  > >perform
                  > > > quality work and had also seen credentialed techs perform poor
                  > >quality work,
                  > > > so not having my license was not very important to me. My
                  > >experience and
                  > > > the quality of my work spoke for itself.
                  > > >
                  > > > What motivated me to finally take my RDCS and RVT exams after
                  > >working very
                  > > > successfully in the field for 25 years was that health care had
                  > >moved in a
                  > > > direction where employers had begun to *require* certification
                  for
                  > >many
                  > > > positions and in some states (and probably in all states at
                  some
                  > >point)
                  > > > Medicare would only reimburse for exams performed by licensed
                  > >techs.
                  > > >
                  > > > I've worked too long in this field to believe that just because
                  > >someone is
                  > > > certified they can do good work, so if I interview someone for
                  a
                  > >position, I
                  > > > have them perform several exams as was required of me. I
                  place a
                  > >lot more
                  > > > value on the quality of their work than on their certification,
                  > >but the fact
                  > > > that they have certification is always a positive thing, and
                  with
                  > >the
                  > > > Medicare reimbursement changes, this has also made licensing
                  much
                  > >more
                  > > > important.
                  > > > Of course, someone that has passed their exams gives an
                  employer
                  > >some
                  > > > confidence in their having some basic knowledge, and this is
                  also
                  > >important,
                  > > > although if you are interviewing with me, I'm going to be
                  > >scrutinizing your
                  > > > pictures and what you know, not your paperwork.
                  > > >
                  > > > If I had to take a position as a traveling tech, I would not
                  want
                  > >to be
                  > > > restricted to working in only certain geographical areas, and I
                  > >would like
                  > > > to be as marketable and desirable as possible to any possible
                  > >future
                  > > > employer. I believe that gaining ICAEL accreditation also
                  > >requires that at
                  > > > least one tech performing exams be credentialed, so having a
                  > >license is a
                  > > > plus to any employer seeking to accredit their lab also.
                  > > >
                  > > > In any case, these are my thoughts on the matter.
                  > > >
                  > > > Regards,
                  > > >
                  > > > Ed Chait, RDCS, RVT
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > _________________________________________________________________
                  > FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar – get it now!
                  > http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/
                  >
                • Gerson Lichtenberg
                  Brenda, I don t know if this will help, but you might try changing how you think about what you see as you work each day. Try asking yourself, Why does it
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jul 8, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Brenda, I don't know if this will help, but you might
                    try changing how you think about what you see as you
                    work each day. Try asking yourself, "Why does it look
                    like that on my screen?" about every single thing you
                    see. If you truly undersatnd what your machine is
                    doing, what information it is acquiring and how it
                    processes along with understanding the interactions
                    between ultrasound and tissue, you will usually be
                    able to answer that question.

                    This may help you to incorporate the Principles and
                    Instrumentation information into your daily work and
                    to apply it better when you answer test questions.

                    Best wishes, and congratulations on your persistence.
                    Gerson Lichtenberg, RDCS
                    Echo Lab Coordinator
                    Mt. Sinai Hospital
                    Chicago, Illinois

                    --- a b <ginalulubaby@...> wrote:

                    > "which makes asking and confirming any questions i
                    > have almost
                    > impossible"
                    >
                    > Ask us! You probably won't get your answers
                    > immediately, but surely within a day or so. Keep a
                    > list and ask away. I'd be pleased to help out.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Brenda King <bkbroiler40@...> wrote:
                    > Thanks for you tips of the ARDMS outline. I have
                    > been doing echo for approx.
                    > 8 yrs with on the job training only. About 5 yrs ago
                    > i took the adult echo
                    > (twice) and passed it and have since taken the
                    > physics 3 times missing it by
                    > 2 and 3 points. Iam in my 30 day waiting period to
                    > apply again.
                    > I did attend Edelmans review and picked up alot but
                    > not enough. I will agree
                    > that his review is wonderful but i can't help feel
                    > that its more to
                    > reiterate what you've learned in school and you need
                    > more indepth overall
                    > information to totally understand and grasp his
                    > outline.
                    > I will be the only tech, other than our traveling
                    > tech to be registered
                    > which makes asking and confirming any questions i
                    > have almost impossible, i
                    > generally only see the RDCS once a week or less.
                    > Becoming registered is not about the money for me
                    > especially because iam
                    > self teaching, its about loving my job and being
                    > given (ojt) when i
                    > couldn't go to school and my personal gratification
                    > to say i accomplished
                    > this being the biggest of my life and i'll be the
                    > first of our lab. After
                    > failing by 3 points this last time i criied all the
                    > way home and had decided
                    > not to put myself through it again. As i said its
                    > not about the money in
                    > fact its not even been discussed. But i cann't stop
                    > there, i've read some of
                    > the pointers in this group and plan to pursue and
                    > pass the physics. Thanks
                    > for all tips.
                    >
                    >
                    > BK
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > >From: "pdigrazi"
                    >
                    > >Reply-To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                    > >To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                    > >Subject: [echocardiography] Re: Thoughts about the
                    > RDCS........
                    > >Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2006 23:34:28 -0000
                    > >
                    > >Well first, I thank everyone for their experience
                    > and thoughts on
                    > >the RDCS. Hopefully I'll encounter a team that
                    > think along the same
                    > >line as everyone here. It will make the environment
                    > a bit more
                    > >easier to work in.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >As for tips and advice on physics.....Well, here is
                    > what I can offer.
                    > >
                    > >First, READ and CHECK OFF the ARDMS outline and
                    > make sure you
                    > >understand the outline well.
                    > >Second, YOU MUST KNOW that it is NOT just physics.
                    > i.e. 39% has to
                    > >do with cardiac principles. So, even if you master
                    > physics, that
                    > >will NOT give you a passing grade. You must know
                    > the rest of the
                    > >stuff also. I guess I stress this because it was my
                    > mistake the
                    > >first time around.
                    > >Third, I was VERY happy with Dr. edelmans physics
                    > seminar, as well
                    > >as with his text book. KNOW HIS MATERIAL WELL.
                    > Answer all the
                    > >questions in the back of his text book and
                    > UNDERSTAND how you got
                    > >the correct answer.
                    > >
                    > >In summary.....There is NO secret, Just the basics.
                    > know ARDMS
                    > >outline and know the material well.
                    > >
                    > >Best wishes.
                    > >
                    > >--- In echocardiography@yahoogroups.com, "JENELLE
                    > TOMPKINS"
                    > > wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Congrats on passing your physics portion of the
                    > RDCS exam. I am
                    > >in the processing of studying myself, and I have
                    > been in the field a
                    > >few years. Like you mention, having your license
                    > does not make you
                    > >more better than someone eles, it may be able to
                    > open more
                    > >opportunities for you, but eventually your work
                    > will carry you
                    > >over. I agree with the other tech, that quality and
                    > a good team
                    > >work approach is very important. So study hard to
                    > pass the second
                    > >portion and hopefully I will be joining you, as a
                    > fellow license
                    > >tech. P.S. Any tips on the physics portion of the
                    > exam. Was
                    > >Edleman's workbook helpfully if you use his books?
                    > > >
                    > > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > > From: Ed Chait
                    > > > Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:29 AM
                    > > > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                    > > > Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about
                    > the RDCS........
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > > From: "pdigrazi"
                    >
                    > > > To:
                    > > > Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 10:47 AM
                    > > > Subject: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the
                    > RDCS........
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > I just passed the physics portion of my RDCS
                    > boards yesterday and
                    > > > feel relieved. I now have the technology portion
                    > to take. On the
                    > > > way home from the exam I asked myself what it
                    > all means to me. Now
                    > > > that I'm on my way to getting registered, what
                    > does it really mean
                    > > > to me?
                    > > > I am still an entry level technologist, just
                    > having finished my
                    > > > cardiovascular program in February of this year.
                    > I have done some
                    > > > temp work a total of 3 weeks here and there, but
                    > I still can not
                    > >say
                    > > > that being registered really makes that much of
                    > a difference to be
                    > > > without the concrete full-time experience, which
                    > is hard to find
                    > > > here in NYC. There are many sonographers (some
                    > that I know) that
                    > >are
                    > > > NOT registered who know just as much as the
                    > cardiologist knows.
                    > > > Please note that I don't want to seem as though
                    > the registry means
                    > > > nothing at all, but it was just a thought that
                    > came to my mind
                    > > > yesterday.
                    > > >
                    > > > I suppose what it really does mean to me is that
                    > I can go to any
                    > > > hospital and present the supervisor with my RDCS
                    > in hopes of
                    > > > conveying to them that if I studied this hard to
                    > pass the RDCS, I
                    > > > may have the potential to learn what I'm taught
                    > and continue to
                    > >grow
                    > > > and be of value to the lab.
                    > > >
                    > > > Opinions are welcomed.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > I can appreciate your thoughts on this and will
                    > relate mine.
                    > > >
                    > > > I worked as an echocardiography/vascular tech
                    > for over 20 years
                    > >without any
                    > > > license or credential. Not having my RDCS or RVT
                    > never really
                    > >impeded me in
                    > > > my career. I gained experience quickly early in
                    > my career due to
                    > >working in
                    > > > busy hospitals in Los Angeles. On the job
                    > interviews I would go
                    > >to, I would
                    > > > perform several echos and the quality of my work
                    > and experience
                    > >seemed to be
                    > > > what was weighed in regards to offering me
                    > whatever position I had
                    > >applied
                    > > > for.
                    > > >
                    > > > Like you have observed, I had seen techs with no
                    > credentialing
                    > >perform
                    > > > quality work and had also seen credentialed
                    > techs perform poor
                    > >quality work,
                    > > > so not having my license was not very important
                    > to me. My
                    > >experience and
                    > > > the quality of my work spoke for itself.
                    > > >
                    > > > What motivated me to finally take my RDCS and
                    > RVT exams after
                    > >working very
                    > > > successfully in the field for 25 years was that
                    > health care had
                    > >moved in a
                    > > > direction where employers had begun to *require*
                    > certification for
                    > >many
                    > > > positions and in some states (and probably in
                    > all states at some
                    > >point)
                    > > > Medicare would only reimburse for exams
                    > performed by licensed
                    > >techs.
                    > > >
                    > > > I've worked too long in this field to believe
                    > that just because
                    > >someone is
                    > > > certified they can do good work, so if I
                    > interview someone for a
                    > >position, I
                    > > > have them perform several exams as was required
                    > of me. I place a
                    > >lot more
                    > > > value on the quality of their work than on their
                    > certification,
                    > >but the fact
                    > > > that they have certification is always a
                    > positive thing, and with
                    > >the
                    > > > Medicare reimbursement changes, this has also
                    > made licensing much
                    > >more
                    > > > important.
                    > > > Of course, someone that has passed their exams
                    > gives an employer
                    > >some
                    > > > confidence in their having some basic knowledge,
                    > and this is also
                    > >important,
                    > > > although if you are interviewing with me, I'm
                    > going to be
                    > >scrutinizing your
                    > > > pictures and what you know, not your paperwork.
                    > > >
                    > > > If I had to take a position as a traveling tech,
                    > I would not want
                    > >to be
                    > > > restricted to working in only certain
                    > geographical areas, and I
                    > >would like
                    > > > to be as marketable and desirable as possible to
                    > any possible
                    > >future
                    > > > employer. I believe that gaining ICAEL
                    > accreditation also
                    > >requires that at
                    > > > least one tech performing exams be credentialed,
                    > so having a
                    > >license is a
                    > > > plus to any employer seeking to accredit their
                    > lab also.
                    > > >
                    > > > In any case, these are my thoughts on the
                    > matter.
                    > > >
                    > > > Regards,
                    > > >
                    > > > Ed Chait, RDCS, RVT
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    _________________________________________________________________
                    > FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar – get
                    > it now!
                    >
                    http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Do you Yahoo!?
                    > Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo!
                    > Mail Beta.


                    Gerson Lichtenberg, RDCS
                    Echocardiography Coordinator
                    Mt. Sinai Hospital
                    Chicago, Illinois
                  • listen2yourheart@lycos.com
                    Dear Brenda, I ve been in echo for over 35 years and spent 12 years teaching in both private and community college settings. I m still scanning and if you d
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jul 10, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Dear Brenda,
                      I've been in echo for over 35 years and spent 12 years teaching
                      in both private and community college settings. I'm still scanning
                      and if you'd like some help with passing the boards I can tell
                      you I have two eight foot tall bookcases full of teaching/learning
                      materials. Will be happy to share. If you have a specific area
                      you'd like to concentrate on - let me know and I can fax you study
                      materials/sample test questions based on same (including cardiovascular
                      principles as well as physics.) If you email me at: listen2yourheart@...
                      we may also be able to connect via phone.

                      Cherie Lawrence RDCS
                      Carondelet Heart Institute
                      St. Joseph's Hospital
                      Kansas City, MO



                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: "Gerson Lichtenberg" <gersonsl@...>
                      > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: RE: [echocardiography] Re: Thoughts about the RDCS........
                      > Date: Sat, 8 Jul 2006 12:29:18 -0700 (PDT)
                      >
                      >
                      > Brenda, I don't know if this will help, but you might
                      > try changing how you think about what you see as you
                      > work each day. Try asking yourself, "Why does it look
                      > like that on my screen?" about every single thing you
                      > see. If you truly undersatnd what your machine is
                      > doing, what information it is acquiring and how it
                      > processes along with understanding the interactions
                      > between ultrasound and tissue, you will usually be
                      > able to answer that question.
                      >
                      > This may help you to incorporate the Principles and
                      > Instrumentation information into your daily work and
                      > to apply it better when you answer test questions.
                      >
                      > Best wishes, and congratulations on your persistence.
                      > Gerson Lichtenberg, RDCS
                      > Echo Lab Coordinator
                      > Mt. Sinai Hospital
                      > Chicago, Illinois
                      >
                      > --- a b <ginalulubaby@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > "which makes asking and confirming any questions i
                      > > have almost impossible"
                      > >
                      > > Ask us! You probably won't get your answers
                      > > immediately, but surely within a day or so. Keep a
                      > > list and ask away. I'd be pleased to help out. Brenda King
                      > > <bkbroiler40@...> wrote:
                      > > Thanks for you tips of the ARDMS outline. I have
                      > > been doing echo for approx. 8 yrs with on the job training only.
                      > > About 5 yrs ago
                      > > i took the adult echo (twice) and passed it and have since taken the
                      > > physics 3 times missing it by 2 and 3 points. Iam in my 30 day
                      > > waiting period to
                      > > apply again.
                      > > I did attend Edelmans review and picked up alot but
                      > > not enough. I will agree that his review is wonderful but i can't help feel
                      > > that its more to reiterate what you've learned in school and you need
                      > > more indepth overall information to totally understand and grasp his
                      > > outline.
                      > > I will be the only tech, other than our traveling
                      > > tech to be registered which makes asking and confirming any questions i
                      > > have almost impossible, i generally only see the RDCS once a week or less.
                      > > Becoming registered is not about the money for me
                      > > especially because iam self teaching, its about loving my job and being
                      > > given (ojt) when i couldn't go to school and my personal gratification
                      > > to say i accomplished this being the biggest of my life and i'll be the
                      > > first of our lab. After failing by 3 points this last time i criied all the
                      > > way home and had decided not to put myself through it again. As i said its
                      > > not about the money in fact its not even been discussed. But i cann't stop
                      > > there, i've read some of the pointers in this group and plan to pursue and
                      > > pass the physics. Thanks for all tips.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > BK
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > >From: "pdigrazi" >Reply-To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                      > > >To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                      > > >Subject: [echocardiography] Re: Thoughts about the
                      > > RDCS........
                      > > >Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2006 23:34:28 -0000
                      > > >
                      > > >Well first, I thank everyone for their experience
                      > > and thoughts on
                      > > >the RDCS. Hopefully I'll encounter a team that
                      > > think along the same
                      > > >line as everyone here. It will make the environment
                      > > a bit more
                      > > >easier to work in.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >As for tips and advice on physics.....Well, here is
                      > > what I can offer.
                      > > >
                      > > >First, READ and CHECK OFF the ARDMS outline and
                      > > make sure you
                      > > >understand the outline well.
                      > > >Second, YOU MUST KNOW that it is NOT just physics.
                      > > i.e. 39% has to
                      > > >do with cardiac principles. So, even if you master
                      > > physics, that
                      > > >will NOT give you a passing grade. You must know
                      > > the rest of the
                      > > >stuff also. I guess I stress this because it was my
                      > > mistake the
                      > > >first time around.
                      > > >Third, I was VERY happy with Dr. edelmans physics
                      > > seminar, as well
                      > > >as with his text book. KNOW HIS MATERIAL WELL.
                      > > Answer all the
                      > > >questions in the back of his text book and
                      > > UNDERSTAND how you got
                      > > >the correct answer.
                      > > >
                      > > >In summary.....There is NO secret, Just the basics.
                      > > know ARDMS
                      > > >outline and know the material well.
                      > > >
                      > > >Best wishes.
                      > > >
                      > > >--- In echocardiography@yahoogroups.com, "JENELLE
                      > > TOMPKINS"
                      > > > wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Congrats on passing your physics portion of the
                      > > RDCS exam. I am
                      > > >in the processing of studying myself, and I have
                      > > been in the field a
                      > > >few years. Like you mention, having your license
                      > > does not make you
                      > > >more better than someone eles, it may be able to
                      > > open more
                      > > >opportunities for you, but eventually your work
                      > > will carry you
                      > > >over. I agree with the other tech, that quality and
                      > > a good team
                      > > >work approach is very important. So study hard to
                      > > pass the second
                      > > >portion and hopefully I will be joining you, as a
                      > > fellow license
                      > > >tech. P.S. Any tips on the physics portion of the
                      > > exam. Was
                      > > >Edleman's workbook helpfully if you use his books?
                      > > > >
                      > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > > > From: Ed Chait
                      > > > > Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:29 AM
                      > > > > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                      > > > > Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about
                      > > the RDCS........
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > > > From: "pdigrazi" > > To: > > Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 10:47 AM
                      > > > > Subject: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the
                      > > RDCS........
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I just passed the physics portion of my RDCS
                      > > boards yesterday and
                      > > > > feel relieved. I now have the technology portion
                      > > to take. On the
                      > > > > way home from the exam I asked myself what it
                      > > all means to me. Now
                      > > > > that I'm on my way to getting registered, what
                      > > does it really mean
                      > > > > to me?
                      > > > > I am still an entry level technologist, just
                      > > having finished my
                      > > > > cardiovascular program in February of this year.
                      > > I have done some
                      > > > > temp work a total of 3 weeks here and there, but
                      > > I still can not
                      > > >say
                      > > > > that being registered really makes that much of
                      > > a difference to be
                      > > > > without the concrete full-time experience, which
                      > > is hard to find
                      > > > > here in NYC. There are many sonographers (some
                      > > that I know) that
                      > > >are
                      > > > > NOT registered who know just as much as the
                      > > cardiologist knows.
                      > > > > Please note that I don't want to seem as though
                      > > the registry means
                      > > > > nothing at all, but it was just a thought that
                      > > came to my mind
                      > > > > yesterday.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I suppose what it really does mean to me is that
                      > > I can go to any
                      > > > > hospital and present the supervisor with my RDCS
                      > > in hopes of
                      > > > > conveying to them that if I studied this hard to
                      > > pass the RDCS, I
                      > > > > may have the potential to learn what I'm taught
                      > > and continue to
                      > > >grow
                      > > > > and be of value to the lab.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Opinions are welcomed.
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I can appreciate your thoughts on this and will
                      > > relate mine.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I worked as an echocardiography/vascular tech
                      > > for over 20 years
                      > > >without any
                      > > > > license or credential. Not having my RDCS or RVT
                      > > never really
                      > > >impeded me in
                      > > > > my career. I gained experience quickly early in
                      > > my career due to
                      > > >working in
                      > > > > busy hospitals in Los Angeles. On the job
                      > > interviews I would go
                      > > >to, I would
                      > > > > perform several echos and the quality of my work
                      > > and experience
                      > > >seemed to be
                      > > > > what was weighed in regards to offering me
                      > > whatever position I had
                      > > >applied
                      > > > > for.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Like you have observed, I had seen techs with no
                      > > credentialing
                      > > >perform
                      > > > > quality work and had also seen credentialed
                      > > techs perform poor
                      > > >quality work,
                      > > > > so not having my license was not very important
                      > > to me. My
                      > > >experience and
                      > > > > the quality of my work spoke for itself.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > What motivated me to finally take my RDCS and
                      > > RVT exams after
                      > > >working very
                      > > > > successfully in the field for 25 years was that
                      > > health care had
                      > > >moved in a
                      > > > > direction where employers had begun to *require*
                      > > certification for
                      > > >many
                      > > > > positions and in some states (and probably in
                      > > all states at some
                      > > >point)
                      > > > > Medicare would only reimburse for exams
                      > > performed by licensed
                      > > >techs.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I've worked too long in this field to believe
                      > > that just because
                      > > >someone is
                      > > > > certified they can do good work, so if I
                      > > interview someone for a
                      > > >position, I
                      > > > > have them perform several exams as was required
                      > > of me. I place a
                      > > >lot more
                      > > > > value on the quality of their work than on their
                      > > certification,
                      > > >but the fact
                      > > > > that they have certification is always a
                      > > positive thing, and with
                      > > >the
                      > > > > Medicare reimbursement changes, this has also
                      > > made licensing much
                      > > >more
                      > > > > important.
                      > > > > Of course, someone that has passed their exams
                      > > gives an employer
                      > > >some
                      > > > > confidence in their having some basic knowledge,
                      > > and this is also
                      > > >important,
                      > > > > although if you are interviewing with me, I'm
                      > > going to be
                      > > >scrutinizing your
                      > > > > pictures and what you know, not your paperwork.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > If I had to take a position as a traveling tech,
                      > > I would not want
                      > > >to be
                      > > > > restricted to working in only certain
                      > > geographical areas, and I
                      > > >would like
                      > > > > to be as marketable and desirable as possible to
                      > > any possible
                      > > >future
                      > > > > employer. I believe that gaining ICAEL
                      > > accreditation also
                      > > >requires that at
                      > > > > least one tech performing exams be credentialed,
                      > > so having a
                      > > >license is a
                      > > > > plus to any employer seeking to accredit their
                      > > lab also.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > In any case, these are my thoughts on the
                      > > matter.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Regards,
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Ed Chait, RDCS, RVT
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > _________________________________________________________________
                      > > FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar ? get
                      > > it now!
                      > http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ---------------------------------
                      > > Do you Yahoo!?
                      > > Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo!
                      > > Mail Beta.
                      >
                      >
                      > Gerson Lichtenberg, RDCS
                      > Echocardiography Coordinator
                      > Mt. Sinai Hospital
                      > Chicago, Illinois

                      >


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                    • Jon Tag
                      BK, TRY Pegasus Lectures. They will show you the other side of physics to help you understand it rather than memorizing it. Should be worth another 10-20
                      Message 10 of 21 , Jul 12, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        BK,
                            TRY Pegasus Lectures.  They will show you the other side of physics to help you understand it rather than memorizing it.  Should be worth another 10-20 points.   
                         
                        -------Original Message-------
                         
                        From: a b
                        Date: 07/06/06 12:19:34
                        Subject: RE: [echocardiography] Re: Thoughts about the RDCS........
                         

                        "which makes asking and confirming any questions i have almost
                        impossible"
                         
                        Ask us!  You probably won't get your answers immediately, but surely within a day or so.  Keep a list and ask away.  I'd be pleased to help out. 
                         


                        Brenda King <bkbroiler40@...> wrote:
                        Thanks for you tips of the ARDMS outline. I have been doing echo for approx.
                        8 yrs with on the job training only. About 5 yrs ago i took the adult echo
                        (twice) and passed it and have since taken the physics 3 times missing it by
                        2 and 3 points. Iam in my 30 day waiting period to apply again.
                        I did attend Edelmans review and picked up alot but not enough. I will agree
                        that his review is wonderful but i can't help feel that its more to
                        reiterate what you've learned in school and you need more indepth overall
                        information to totally understand and grasp his outline.
                        I will be the only tech, other than our traveling tech to be registered
                        which makes asking and confirming any questions i have almost impossible, i
                        generally only see the RDCS once a week or less.
                        Becoming registered is not about the money for me especially because iam
                        self teaching, its about loving my job and being given (ojt) when i
                        couldn't go to school and my personal gratification to say i accomplished
                        this being the biggest of my life and i'll be the first of our lab. After
                        failing by 3 points this last time i criied all the way home and had decided
                        not to put myself through it again. As i said its not about the money in
                        fact its not even been discussed. But i cann't stop there, i've read some of
                        the pointers in this group and plan to pursue and pass the physics. Thanks
                        for all tips.


                        BK



                        >From: "pdigrazi"
                        >Reply-To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                        >To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                        >Subject: [echocardiography] Re: Thoughts about the RDCS........
                        >Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2006 23:34:28 -0000
                        >
                        >Well first, I thank everyone for their experience and thoughts on
                        >the RDCS. Hopefully I'll encounter a team that think along the same
                        >line as everyone here. It will make the environment a bit more
                        >easier to work in.
                        >
                        >
                        >As for tips and advice on physics.....Well, here is what I can offer.
                        >
                        >First, READ and CHECK OFF the ARDMS outline and make sure you
                        >understand the outline well.
                        >Second, YOU MUST KNOW that it is NOT just physics. i.e. 39% has to
                        >do with cardiac principles. So, even if you master physics, that
                        >will NOT give you a passing grade. You must know the rest of the
                        >stuff also. I guess I stress this because it was my mistake the
                        >first time around.
                        >Third, I was VERY happy with Dr. edelmans physics seminar, as well
                        >as with his text book. KNOW HIS MATERIAL WELL. Answer all the
                        >questions in the back of his text book and UNDERSTAND how you got
                        >the correct answer.
                        >
                        >In summary.....There is NO secret, Just the basics. know ARDMS
                        >outline and know the material well.
                        >
                        >Best wishes.
                        >
                        >--- In echocardiography@yahoogroups.com, "JENELLE TOMPKINS"
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Congrats on passing your physics portion of the RDCS exam. I am
                        >in the processing of studying myself, and I have been in the field a
                        >few years. Like you mention, having your license does not make you
                        >more better than someone eles, it may be able to open more
                        >opportunities for you, but eventually your work will carry you
                        >over. I agree with the other tech, that quality and a good team
                        >work approach is very important. So study hard to pass the second
                        >portion and hopefully I will be joining you, as a fellow license
                        >tech. P.S. Any tips on the physics portion of the exam. Was
                        >Edleman's workbook helpfully if you use his books?
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > From: Ed Chait
                        > > Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2006 10:29 AM
                        > > To: echocardiography@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Subject: Re: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > From: "pdigrazi"
                        > > To:
                        > > Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2006 10:47 AM
                        > > Subject: [echocardiography] Thoughts about the RDCS........
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I just passed the physics portion of my RDCS boards yesterday and
                        > > feel relieved. I now have the technology portion to take. On the
                        > > way home from the exam I asked myself what it all means to me. Now
                        > > that I'm on my way to getting registered, what does it really mean
                        > > to me?
                        > > I am still an entry level technologist, just having finished my
                        > > cardiovascular program in February of this year. I have done some
                        > > temp work a total of 3 weeks here and there, but I still can not
                        >say
                        > > that being registered really makes that much of a difference to be
                        > > without the concrete full-time experience, which is hard to find
                        > > here in NYC. There are many sonographers (some that I know) that
                        >are
                        > > NOT registered who know just as much as the cardiologist knows.
                        > > Please note that I don't want to seem as though the registry means
                        > > nothing at all, but it was just a thought that came to my mind
                        > > yesterday.
                        > >
                        > > I suppose what it really does mean to me is that I can go to any
                        > > hospital and present the supervisor with my RDCS in hopes of
                        > > conveying to them that if I studied this hard to pass the RDCS, I
                        > > may have the potential to learn what I'm taught and continue to
                        >grow
                        > > and be of value to the lab.
                        > >
                        > > Opinions are welcomed.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I can appreciate your thoughts on this and will relate mine.
                        > >
                        > > I worked as an echocardiography/vascular tech for over 20 years
                        >without any
                        > > license or credential. Not having my RDCS or RVT never really
                        >impeded me in
                        > > my career. I gained experience quickly early in my career due to
                        >working in
                        > > busy hospitals in Los Angeles. On the job interviews I would go
                        >to, I would
                        > > perform several echos and the quality of my work and experience
                        >seemed to be
                        > > what was weighed in regards to offering me whatever position I had
                        >applied
                        > > for.
                        > >
                        > > Like you have observed, I had seen techs with no credentialing
                        >perform
                        > > quality work and had also seen credentialed techs perform poor
                        >quality work,
                        > > so not having my license was not very important to me. My
                        >experience and
                        > > the quality of my work spoke for itself.
                        > >
                        > > What motivated me to finally take my RDCS and RVT exams after
                        >working very
                        > > successfully in the field for 25 years was that health care had
                        >moved in a
                        > > direction where employers had begun to *require* certification for
                        >many
                        > > positions and in some states (and probably in all states at some
                        >point)
                        > > Medicare would only reimburse for exams performed by licensed
                        >techs.
                        > >
                        > > I've worked too long in this field to believe that just because
                        >someone is
                        > > certified they can do good work, so if I interview someone for a
                        >position, I
                        > > have them perform several exams as was required of me. I place a
                        >lot more
                        > > value on the quality of their work than on their certification,
                        >but the fact
                        > > that they have certification is always a positive thing, and with
                        >the
                        > > Medicare reimbursement changes, this has also made licensing much
                        >more
                        > > important.
                        > > Of course, someone that has passed their exams gives an employer
                        >some
                        > > confidence in their having some basic knowledge, and this is also
                        >important,
                        > > although if you are interviewing with me, I'm going to be
                        >scrutinizing your
                        > > pictures and what you know, not your paperwork.
                        > >
                        > > If I had to take a position as a traveling tech, I would not want
                        >to be
                        > > restricted to working in only certain geographical areas, and I
                        >would like
                        > > to be as marketable and desirable as possible to any possible
                        >future
                        > > employer. I believe that gaining ICAEL accreditation also
                        >requires that at
                        > > least one tech performing exams be credentialed, so having a
                        >license is a
                        > > plus to any employer seeking to accredit their lab also.
                        > >
                        > > In any case, these are my thoughts on the matter.
                        > >
                        > > Regards,
                        > >
                        > > Ed Chait, RDCS, RVT
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >

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