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Re: [ebook-community] a talent for writing doesn't translate to a talent for marketing

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  • Chris
    On Thu, 31 Mar 2011, joseph harris wrote: where it s asked What is
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2011
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      On Thu, 31 Mar 2011, joseph harris wrote:

      <http://www.teleread.com/ebooks/author-driven-marketing-what-is-an-introvert-author-to-do/>

      where it's asked "What is an introvert author to do?"

      Do something else?

      The river is fast, strong and deep. You can dip your toe in - but
      if you want to swim in the river, you will need to be a strong
      swimmer. The river doesn't slow down for you.

      I am reminded of Loreena McKennitt. She is a self-published,
      self-managed musician, who owns her own record label. Years ago,
      I read an interview, where she noted that she had tried to find
      some way to offload the management portion of the work - ideally
      hiring a business manager. But she couldn't find an arrangement
      that didn't make it seem like she was working for *them* rather
      than the other way around. (*1)

      So, she did it - and continues to do it - herself. I really wish
      I had a reference and not just a memory, because I recall her
      saying that the managment work took 90% of her time - time she
      rather would have been working on the music.

      So - maybe it's partly a matter of expectations? Perhaps doing
      your own marketing won't seem like such a problem when you
      realize that to do it reasonably, it's going to take over half of
      your time - and take it away from your writing.

      (*1: some expressed here http://preview.tinyurl.com/3p35tn4 and
      here http://preview.tinyurl.com/3n4cmm6 )




      : chris smith ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
      : nihil tam munitum quod non expugnari pecunia possit - cicero :
    • paynemack48@yahoo.com
      ... It is an interesting fact of life that many times a person is gifted in one area such as the arts and totally tone deaf in other areas such as the business
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 14, 2011
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        --- In ebook-community@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Dowdy <joseph@...> wrote:
        >
        > This is true and not just of authors. I think we all know the plight of
        > painters and masters of hard craft such as pottery, furniture markers and
        > those who build ships in bottles.
        >
        > I was just reading Ursula K. LeGuin's take on the importance of copyrights
        > and how they are a relatively recent invention. She says, "writers mostly
        > lived by finding and sucking up to a rich patron" (
        > http://www.ursulakleguin.com/Blog2011.html#Unfacts) and it would be true as
        > well that the patron would be the one who would do the word-of-mouth because
        > their words carry more weight.
        >
        > This also strikes at the heart of why it is that we have a world of
        > Microsoft Windows PCs and a world of Apple Macintosh computers and still not
        > much of a third choice (although I can tell you that I rarely use either
        > Windows or the Mac for a majority of my work). With quality work comes a
        > disdain for the profit and loss and in turn the marketing and selling to
        > your average guy/gal; those who "get it" or recognize the art of it or
        > demand quality will buy it. With quality marketing and sales comes a disdain
        > for a high price point because that means fewer sales and fewer sales means
        > lower profits and you won't be the world's richest man by charging too much
        > for something that every one should own.
        >
        > It's a very broad generalization, but it's so true so much of the time that
        > it should be an axiom of life: Artists don't make enough money without a
        > head for business and a head for business can't make art without enough
        > money.
        >
        > On Thu, Mar 31, 2011 at 3:28 AM, joseph harris <smilepoet@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Worth reading for those who want to understand the Amanda Hocking story -
        > > and why she is changing! And considering the conflict between writing and
        > > publisity - will readers be the ultimate losers?]
        > >
        > > The problem is that a talent for writing doesn't translate to a talent for
        > > marketing
        > > http://www.booktrade.info/i.php/32866
        > >
        > > http://www.salon.com/books/laura_miller/2011/03/29/writer_sell_thyself/index.html
        > > '...Hocking ...[has]...complained more than once about the trouble she's
        > > had finding freelance editors capable of catching the typos and grammatical
        > > errors that keep turning up in her novels....'
        > > '...Even if the next generation's "To Kill a Mockingbird" gets published,
        > > the author's inability to promote it effectively may prevent it from
        > > reaching the millions of readers who would otherwise embrace it...., I want
        > > the writers whose work I admire to have as much time as possible to write as
        > > many books as they wish. ....'
        > >
        > > http://www.teleread.com/ebooks/author-driven-marketing-what-is-an-introvert-author-to-do/
        > >
        > > Joseph Harris is Smile Poet
        > > Mailing list smilepoet-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > > http://smilepoet.com smilepoet@...
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > <http://meshmarketer.com>
        > <http://MeshMarketer.com>
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        It is an interesting fact of life that many times a person is gifted in one area such as the arts and totally tone deaf in other areas such as the business world. A friend wrote a very good book about his own experiences with child abuse but could not sell it. Writing a good book is only half the battle. The other half is selling the book. I showed him how and now it is selling. It is not a best seller yet but it is selling. http://teamebookpublishers.com
      • auwg
        ... I just saw that article the other day while Googling. Or maybe it was a link from the Wiki page? At any rate, she s still doing her own thing as of a
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 14, 2011
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          --- In ebook-community@yahoogroups.com, Chris <smith@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Thu, 31 Mar 2011, joseph harris wrote:
          > <http://www.teleread.com/ebooks/author-driven-marketing-what-is-an-introvert-author-to-do/>
          > where it's asked "What is an introvert author to do?"
          >
          > Do something else?
          > I am reminded of Loreena McKennitt. She is a self-published,
          > self-managed musician, who owns her own record label. Years ago,
          > I read an interview, where she noted that she had tried to find
          > some way to offload the management portion of the work - ideally
          > hiring a business manager. But she couldn't find an arrangement
          > that didn't make it seem like she was working for *them* rather
          > than the other way around. (*1)

          I just saw that article the other day while Googling. Or maybe it was a link from the Wiki page? At any rate, she's still doing her own thing as of a couple of months ago, subbing out only the production of tapes and CDs if I understand things correctly.

          > So, she did it - and continues to do it - herself. I really wish
          > I had a reference and not just a memory, because I recall her
          > saying that the managment work took 90% of her time - time she
          > rather would have been working on the music.

          So say we all who create stuff, I think. We tend to regard bookkeeping and marketing as the scut work of being artistic.

          > So - maybe it's partly a matter of expectations? Perhaps doing
          > your own marketing won't seem like such a problem when you
          > realize that to do it reasonably, it's going to take over half of
          > your time - and take it away from your writing.

          Tis true. It's also why the publishers and resellers can pretty much tell us what they're willing to pay us as commissions.
          The only thing that has made them favorably reconsider our cut of the pie was the amount of competition at their end when Amazon and many others jumped into ebook selling.
          Ed
          Ed Howdershelt - Abintra Press
          Science Fiction & Semi-Fiction
          http://www.AbintraPress.com
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