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digital grand design... UK Telegraph plans

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  • joseph harris
    This is interesting in the approach to handling the challenge of the digital world for established media. One is left wanting to know more, but it does hint at
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 1, 2009
      This is interesting in the approach to handling the challenge of the digital world for established media. One is left wanting to know more, but it does hint at a change of philosophy in the business model. Something worth reading and puzzling about.

      Joseph

      Will Lewis: 'The Future Of The Telegraph Lies In Euston'
      http://www.booktrade.info/i.php/24542
      http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2009/nov/30/telegraph-digital-will-lewis-euston-project


      Joseph Harris - Debt Control Man
      http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk
      Author: Control Your Debt Crisi on Your Own Terms
      SAQ - SAve the cheQue
    • Chris
      ... I finally realized that this the Guardian writing about the Guardian, which probably explains why an article with so little actual content made it to
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 1, 2009
        On Tue, 1 Dec 2009, joseph harris wrote:

        > This is interesting in the approach to handling the challenge
        > of the digital world for established media. One is left wanting
        > to know more, but it does hint at a change of philosophy in the
        > business model. Something worth reading and puzzling about.

        I finally realized that this the Guardian writing about the
        Guardian, which probably explains why an article with so little
        actual content made it to press. There's almost more content in
        the headline than in the article.

        You're right - one is definitely left wanting more; in fact,
        wanting anything at all! Since you are closer - literally - to
        this than most of us, please pass on a heads up when they
        announce more.

        Meanwhile, I'm curious about how opinion is on the ground in the
        UK on the idea of "three accusations and you're out" as part of
        Lord Mandelson's plans. Although everyone thinkis of music files,
        I haven't seen anything that indicates that ebooks wouldn't fall
        under the same regime.

        From this side of the Atlantic, it seems like it would be
        punishment without evidence, but in past decades I've heard some
        unusual things about where UK law is allowed to go.



        : chris smith ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
        : nihil tam munitum quod non expugnari pecunia possit - cicero :
      • joseph harris
        From: Chris ... Do my best Chris to keep you updated, but this is the Guardian writing about The Telegraph group. Politically they are on opposite poles. I
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 1, 2009
          From: "Chris"
          > On Tue, 1 Dec 2009, joseph harris wrote:
          >
          >> This is interesting in the approach to handling the challenge
          >> of the digital world for established media. One is left wanting
          >> to know more, but it does hint at a change of philosophy in the
          >> business model. Something worth reading and puzzling about.
          >
          > I finally realized that this the Guardian writing about the
          > Guardian, which probably explains why an article with so little
          > actual content made it to press. There's almost more content in
          > the headline than in the article.
          >
          > You're right - one is definitely left wanting more; in fact,
          > wanting anything at all! Since you are closer - literally - to
          > this than most of us, please pass on a heads up when they
          > announce more.
          >
          > Meanwhile, I'm curious about how opinion is on the ground in the
          > UK on the idea of "three accusations and you're out" as part of
          > Lord Mandelson's plans. Although everyone thinkis of music files,
          > I haven't seen anything that indicates that ebooks wouldn't fall
          > under the same regime.
          >
          > From this side of the Atlantic, it seems like it would be
          > punishment without evidence, but in past decades I've heard some
          > unusual things about where UK law is allowed to go.
          >
          >
          >
          > : chris smith ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
          > : nihil tam munitum quod non expugnari pecunia possit - cicero :
          >

          Do my best Chris to keep you updated, but this is the Guardian writing about The Telegraph group. Politically they are on opposite poles. I suspect Lewis of the Telegraph has hyped himself and his bosses to a model that looks good in the 'snow', like certain male arts, but is soon dissolved away. That seems to me the reason for revealing the move, but not the reasoning.

          He's come close to destroying the papers with the move to Victoria in my humble opinion...

          I was briefly in touch with the Open Rights Group here, but found some views on copyright rather far out for my poor logic. Still they do a good job in the general area of both fighting controls and preserving freedoms and have forced the governemnt to listen a bit.

          So I think while the Machiavelli plots his plots and suck up to any open cheque book, his plans tend to fall before the last fence. But the idea is nonsense. I suspect Lammy, the actual minister in th area, has a reasonable approach, offending absolutely every interest ;-); a reasonable test for a fair balance ;-).

          Joseph


          Joseph Harris - Debt Control Man
          http://www.controlyourdebtcrisis.co.uk
          Author: Control Your Debt Crisi on Your Own Terms
          SAQ - SAve the cheQue
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