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Protection

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  • hauntingflute
    Hello everyone, I wanted to ask the group what they thought about protection before, during, and after a reading. I have read about different methods but I
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 1 5:41 PM
      Hello everyone,

      I wanted to ask the group what they thought about protection before, during, and after a
      reading. I have read about different methods but I wonder how historically accurate they are.
      Does anyone know about a documented account of using a circle, broom, etc? I imagine the
      problem would be who would have written it down...as many people in the past could have
      been persecuted (depending on the society and when). The funny thing is I have not found
      much "historically traceable" methods of "psychic" protection methods. It could be this was largely an oral tradition.

      For my personnel use I have developed a method I am comfortable with, but was wondering
      what people used in the past.

      Cheers,
      Shoshana
    • Virginia Taylor
      Divination doesn t seem to have been considered as risky as a lot of other forms of negromancy . I think it s because most of what we are dealing with is low
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 2 8:03 AM
        Divination doesn't seem to have been considered as risky as a lot of
        other forms of "negromancy". I think it's because most of what we are
        dealing with is "low magic", or what the people do, and you don't get
        to the theory that all magick is caused by the acts of devils/demons/
        fallen angels etc. until you get to the philosophical realms of the
        educated upper classes. Still, I think Astrology probably falls into
        the area of "Natural sciences" (along with the study of the
        properties of stones, etc. so you don't need protection for simple
        study- only when you take that study and do a summoning. No "forces"
        are being called or raised when one does a palm reading any more than
        when one reads the clouds. You're just looking at what's there.
        I'm not sure about such forms of divination as "key and book" or
        "sieve and shears" or using a dousing rod. In those cases some
        external force may be supposed to be directing the action of the object.
        Tchipakkan

        "Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity, and in cold
        weather becomes frozen, even so does inaction sap the vigors of the
        mind." Leonardo Da Vinci







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • hauntingflute
        I never heard of divination as being low magic but then again....I learned from my own experiences and the trees :-) What defines low from high ? Is
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 3 3:24 PM
          I never heard of divination as being "low magic" but then again....I learned from my own experiences and the trees :-) What defines "low" from "high"? Is "low" magic done by
          people and "high" magic done by not-people?

          I find that dealing with people in general may call for some form of protection...but I am
          also an introvert so social interaction can be "draining" for me sometimes. Also, I have
          met people that just gave me a "bad feeling" and I think we have all met people that can
          put us into a bad mood. I feel that finding a way to dispell these "negative energies"
          might be useful. I was curious what folks found helpful. I myself use music.

          It is interesting that you mentioned philosophical realms of magic as I look to quantum physics in this regard.


          --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Divination doesn't seem to have been considered as risky as a lot of
          > other forms of "negromancy". I think it's because most of what we are
          > dealing with is "low magic", or what the people do, and you don't get
          > to the theory that all magick is caused by the acts of devils/demons/
          > fallen angels etc. until you get to the philosophical realms of the
          > educated upper classes. Still, I think Astrology probably falls into
          > the area of "Natural sciences" (along with the study of the
          > properties of stones, etc. so you don't need protection for simple
          > study- only when you take that study and do a summoning. No "forces"
          > are being called or raised when one does a palm reading any more than
          > when one reads the clouds. You're just looking at what's there.
          > I'm not sure about such forms of divination as "key and book" or
          > "sieve and shears" or using a dousing rod. In those cases some
          > external force may be supposed to be directing the action of the object.
          > Tchipakkan
          >
          > "Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity, and in cold
          > weather becomes frozen, even so does inaction sap the vigors of the
          > mind." Leonardo Da Vinci
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Jeanne Wardwell
          ... Tchipakkan referred to the state of the case quite well. High magic is/was the kind done very ceremonially, usually by summoning entities to accomplish
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 3 3:56 PM
            On 3 Jul 2008 at 22:24, hauntingflute wrote:

            > I never heard of divination as being "low magic" but then again....I learned from my own experiences and the trees :-) What defines "low" from "high"? Is "low" magic done by
            > people and "high" magic done by not-people?
            >
            Tchipakkan referred to the state of the case quite well. "High magic" is/was
            the kind done very ceremonially, usually by summoning entities to
            accomplish something, and using Latin or Hebrew, hence "ceremonial
            magic" which was popular among certain members of the more privileged
            classes in period and later. "Low magic" is equivalent to folk magic or
            kitchen magic or the like, i.e. the things that were done by the common folk
            as a matter of course and usually without any formalities. (The phrase is
            comparable to speaking, in the Catholic church, of "high Mass" which has
            all the bells and whistles, and "low Mass" which is the unadorned basics.)

            Morwenna
          • hauntingflute
            Ah! I understand now, thanks! The funny thing is I never thought of divination as being or using magic . When I think of magic I think of spell casting,
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 10 7:46 PM
              Ah! I understand now, thanks! The funny thing is I never thought of divination as being or
              using "magic". When I think of magic I think of spell casting, etc. But that must be the difference i.e. "low" and "high" (or at least how I think of it).

              Cheers



              --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, "Jeanne Wardwell"
              <jcwardwell@...> wrote:
              >
              > On 3 Jul 2008 at 22:24, hauntingflute wrote:
              >
              > > I never heard of divination as being "low magic" but then again....I learned from my
              own experiences and the trees :-) What defines "low" from "high"? Is "low" magic done by
              > > people and "high" magic done by not-people?
              > >
              > Tchipakkan referred to the state of the case quite well. "High magic" is/was
              > the kind done very ceremonially, usually by summoning entities to
              > accomplish something, and using Latin or Hebrew, hence "ceremonial
              > magic" which was popular among certain members of the more privileged
              > classes in period and later. "Low magic" is equivalent to folk magic or
              > kitchen magic or the like, i.e. the things that were done by the common folk
              > as a matter of course and usually without any formalities. (The phrase is
              > comparable to speaking, in the Catholic church, of "high Mass" which has
              > all the bells and whistles, and "low Mass" which is the unadorned basics.)
              >
              > Morwenna
              >
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