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Books on Runes

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  • Virginia Taylor
    I think I already sent in the list of my Tarot and Palmistry books, so (since someone on another list) asked about Rune books, these were the ones I could put
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 29 11:15 AM
      I think I already sent in the list of my Tarot and Palmistry books,
      so (since someone on another list) asked about Rune books, these were
      the ones I could put my hands on right away. (I HAVE to organize my
      library!)

      Arcarti, Kristyna, A Beginners Guide to Runes, 1994 (little)
      Aswyn, Freya, Leaves of Yggdrasil, 1992 (feminist)
      Aswyn, Freya, Northern Mysteries and Magick, 2002 (basically a
      reprint when feminism stopped selling)
      Barret, David, Runes, 1995 (little)
      Blum, Ralph, The Book of Runes, 1982 (the one that came with the rune
      tiles and invented in the black rune)
      Blum, Ralph, The Healing Runes, 1995 (I had to)
      Dee, Jonathan, An Illustrated Guide to Runes, 2001
      Elliott, Ralph, Runes, 1989/1959
      Flowers, Stephen, The Secret of the Runes, 1988
      Flowers, Stephen, The Secret King, Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmler�s Lord
      of the Runes, Real Documents of Nazi Occultism, 2001
      Fries, Jan, Helrunar, 1993
      Kemble, J M, Anglo-Saxon Runes, 1991 (reprint)
      Knight, Sirona, The Little Giant Encyclopedia of Runes, 2000 (lots of
      info, but many people dislike her lack of attribution)
      Kodratoff, Yves, Nordic Magic Healing: Healing Galdr, Healing Runes,
      2003
      Lilly, Simon, Practical Guide to Runes, 2002
      Meadows, Kenneth, Rune Power, 2002
      Mountfort, Paul Rhys, Nordic Runes, 2003
      Osborn and Longland, Rune Games, 1982
      Page, R. I., Introduction to English Runes, 2006 (reprint)
      Page, R. I., Runes Reading the Past
      Paxson, Diana, Taking up the Runes, 2005
      Pennick, Nigel, Complete Illustrated Guide to the Runes, 2002 (a
      fairly good overview)
      Pennick, Nigel, Rune Magic, 1992
      Pennick, Nigel, Secrets of the Runes, 1992
      Plowright, Sweyn, The Rune Primer: Down to Earth Guide to the Runes,
      2006
      Pollington, Stephen, Rudiments of Runelore, 1995
      Seschel, Lisa, A Practical Guide to the Runes 2002
      Stine, Jean Marie, Empowering your Life with Runes, 2004
      Thorsson, Edred, Runelore, 1987
      Thorsson, Edred, Futhark, a Handbook of Rune Magic, 1984
      Thorsson, Edred, Runemight, 1989
      Thorsson, Edred, At the Well of Wyrd: A Handbook of Runic Divination,
      1989 (most of Thorsson is quite skipable)
      Thorsson, Edred, Northern Magic, 1992
      Thorsson, Edred, Green Runa, 1996
      Wild, Leon, the Runes Workbook, 2004


      Tchipakkan

      If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish
      thing.

      -- Anatole France





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jane Sibley
      Hi, all! Almost all of the below books are New Age and not reflective of traditional rune usage. However, good books are those by RI Page; Kemble is a bit
      Message 2 of 14 , May 29, 2008
        Hi, all!
        Almost all of the below books are New Age and not reflective of traditional rune usage. However, good books are those by RI Page; Kemble is a bit dated but OK, but the rest...yerrrch! I have many of those. Flowers is OK on German material, especially the 19th and 20th century romantic revival stuff, but he tends to believe his material a bit too much. When he writes as Edred Thorsson, it's *really* New Age with a tinge of some of the stuff that the Nazis were into. Nigel Pennick also wrote a book on runic astrology; I own Xerox copies of the 2 Nazi publications which most of that was taken from.

        Really good books on runes:
        anything by RI Page
        anything by Tineke Looijenga
        Jansson, Sven BF: The Runes of Sweden
        Moltke, Erik: Runes and their Origins, Denmark and Elsewhere

        many of those can be borrowed via ILL (Interlibrary Loan).

        look also on the Nytt om Runer page (google it) for good bibliographic material. I also have my runic bibliography, which I call "the red book", for sale on my web page www.auntiearwenspices.com (look in the books category).

        arwen

        Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...> wrote:
        I think I already sent in the list of my Tarot and Palmistry books,
        so (since someone on another list) asked about Rune books, these were
        the ones I could put my hands on right away. (I HAVE to organize my
        library!)

        Arcarti, Kristyna, A Beginners Guide to Runes, 1994 (little)
        Aswyn, Freya, Leaves of Yggdrasil, 1992 (feminist)
        Aswyn, Freya, Northern Mysteries and Magick, 2002 (basically a
        reprint when feminism stopped selling)
        Barret, David, Runes, 1995 (little)
        Blum, Ralph, The Book of Runes, 1982 (the one that came with the rune
        tiles and invented in the black rune)
        Blum, Ralph, The Healing Runes, 1995 (I had to)
        Dee, Jonathan, An Illustrated Guide to Runes, 2001
        Elliott, Ralph, Runes, 1989/1959
        Flowers, Stephen, The Secret of the Runes, 1988
        Flowers, Stephen, The Secret King, Karl Maria Wiligut, Himmler’s Lord
        of the Runes, Real Documents of Nazi Occultism, 2001
        Fries, Jan, Helrunar, 1993
        Kemble, J M, Anglo-Saxon Runes, 1991 (reprint)
        Knight, Sirona, The Little Giant Encyclopedia of Runes, 2000 (lots of
        info, but many people dislike her lack of attribution)
        Kodratoff, Yves, Nordic Magic Healing: Healing Galdr, Healing Runes,
        2003
        Lilly, Simon, Practical Guide to Runes, 2002
        Meadows, Kenneth, Rune Power, 2002
        Mountfort, Paul Rhys, Nordic Runes, 2003
        Osborn and Longland, Rune Games, 1982
        Page, R. I., Introduction to English Runes, 2006 (reprint)
        Page, R. I., Runes Reading the Past
        Paxson, Diana, Taking up the Runes, 2005
        Pennick, Nigel, Complete Illustrated Guide to the Runes, 2002 (a
        fairly good overview)
        Pennick, Nigel, Rune Magic, 1992
        Pennick, Nigel, Secrets of the Runes, 1992
        Plowright, Sweyn, The Rune Primer: Down to Earth Guide to the Runes,
        2006
        Pollington, Stephen, Rudiments of Runelore, 1995
        Seschel, Lisa, A Practical Guide to the Runes 2002
        Stine, Jean Marie, Empowering your Life with Runes, 2004
        Thorsson, Edred, Runelore, 1987
        Thorsson, Edred, Futhark, a Handbook of Rune Magic, 1984
        Thorsson, Edred, Runemight, 1989
        Thorsson, Edred, At the Well of Wyrd: A Handbook of Runic Divination,
        1989 (most of Thorsson is quite skipable)
        Thorsson, Edred, Northern Magic, 1992
        Thorsson, Edred, Green Runa, 1996
        Wild, Leon, the Runes Workbook, 2004


        Tchipakkan

        If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish
        thing.

        -- Anatole France





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Virginia Taylor
        I m not sure I d refer to them as New Age as such. I tend to think of New Age as crystals, candles, guardian angels, aura-photography, and maybe some core
        Message 3 of 14 , May 30, 2008
          I'm not sure I'd refer to them as New Age as such. I tend to think of
          New Age as crystals, candles, guardian angels, aura-photography, and
          maybe some core shamanism. I think of most of the rune books as spin-
          offs of the pagan/heathen movement and divination. What they are,
          mostly, is attempts by modern people to try to figure out how they
          may have been used. Certainly they don't attempt to claim that they
          were actually used that way in period (which is, of course, what
          SCAers want).
          Each author has his or her own spin. The Nazi groups had theirs,
          Kemble had his. Freya added a feminist bias (that I might throw into
          the NA hamper). This puts us squarely into the UPG (Unverifiable
          Personal Gnosis) or Experiential argument. If it works for the
          practitioner, it's hard to argue that it doesn't work. Still, the way
          that many sorts of divination work is that you set a bunch of symbols
          in your mind to mean something, create a random generating system for
          those symbols, and those symbols work- even if what you have decided
          they mean is totally different than what they meant to another group
          of people.
          I guess the big issue in the SCA is that unlike other people who are
          just doing it for divination, we are also exploring history, and
          don't have that option. If we are doing divination in any public
          forum of an SCA event we should be able to not only have mastered the
          technique we are using, but also be able to tell our fellow history
          enthusiasts which parts of what we are doing we have any
          documentation for.
          I'm perfectly comfortable telling people that we have lots of
          documentation for runes being used for writing and magick, but
          exceptionally small hints to support their being used for divination.
          And I flatly refuse to use Tarot type spreads (such as were developed
          during the same period the SCA was being developed) for runes, rune
          tiles, rune cards, or most of the modern permutations. I stick with
          the system I learned from Arwen- it gives a better reading anyway. I
          suppose I am guilty of promoting the use of "Popsicle sticks" as
          practice tools- but I do tell people to move on to cutting their own.
          I guess my position is that when we have holes in our knowledge, I'm
          comfortable with the usual SCA practice of making clear what's
          research and what's something we developed that works.
          Tchipakkan

          Don't be there when the blow lands-

          wisdom of Ælfwine





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • hauntingflute
          Some of my favorite books that involve runes are The Agricola and The German, Tacitus The Poetic Edda (A collection of translated Norse-Icelandic mythology
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 19, 2008
            Some of my favorite books that involve "runes" are

            The Agricola and The German, Tacitus
            The Poetic Edda (A collection of translated Norse-Icelandic mythology written as poetry)

            In the poetic Edda...the runes are talked about only as part of the story...for example
            "She will teach you powerful runes, all those which men wish to know, and how to speak
            every single human tongue, medicine with healing knowledge; may you live blessed, king!"
            (pg 145)

            Tacitus was a Roman historian and wrote one of the most in depth descriptions of how the
            Germans used "runes" but he did not use the word "rune" for example "...They cut off a
            branch of a nut-bearing tree and slice it into strips; these they mark with different signs
            and throw them completely at random..."

            Tacitus also wrote that they used the flight of birds and actions by specially kept horses as
            well.

            Some think that runes were "invented" by tribes in Northern Italy which then were taken up
            by German tribes, from there they spread all over the place...Iceland being one of the last
            "hold outs".

            Problem is...the runes are very much what their name implies "a secret"...the modern
            books that are written about runes draw from very few historical sources. And the
            historical sources themselves are not specific to the letter. I have also read a number of
            the modern books and found different interpretations for the runes between them. But,
            the general meaning was basically the same. What I have done was to read both historical
            sources, modern sources, talk with people, and work with the runes themselves. Based on
            the question and my intuition is how I conduct readings.

            --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I'm not sure I'd refer to them as New Age as such. I tend to think of
            > New Age as crystals, candles, guardian angels, aura-photography, and
            > maybe some core shamanism. I think of most of the rune books as spin-
            > offs of the pagan/heathen movement and divination. What they are,
            > mostly, is attempts by modern people to try to figure out how they
            > may have been used. Certainly they don't attempt to claim that they
            > were actually used that way in period (which is, of course, what
            > SCAers want).
            > Each author has his or her own spin. The Nazi groups had theirs,
            > Kemble had his. Freya added a feminist bias (that I might throw into
            > the NA hamper). This puts us squarely into the UPG (Unverifiable
            > Personal Gnosis) or Experiential argument. If it works for the
            > practitioner, it's hard to argue that it doesn't work. Still, the way
            > that many sorts of divination work is that you set a bunch of symbols
            > in your mind to mean something, create a random generating system for
            > those symbols, and those symbols work- even if what you have decided
            > they mean is totally different than what they meant to another group
            > of people.
            > I guess the big issue in the SCA is that unlike other people who are
            > just doing it for divination, we are also exploring history, and
            > don't have that option. If we are doing divination in any public
            > forum of an SCA event we should be able to not only have mastered the
            > technique we are using, but also be able to tell our fellow history
            > enthusiasts which parts of what we are doing we have any
            > documentation for.
            > I'm perfectly comfortable telling people that we have lots of
            > documentation for runes being used for writing and magick, but
            > exceptionally small hints to support their being used for divination.
            > And I flatly refuse to use Tarot type spreads (such as were developed
            > during the same period the SCA was being developed) for runes, rune
            > tiles, rune cards, or most of the modern permutations. I stick with
            > the system I learned from Arwen- it gives a better reading anyway. I
            > suppose I am guilty of promoting the use of "Popsicle sticks" as
            > practice tools- but I do tell people to move on to cutting their own.
            > I guess my position is that when we have holes in our knowledge, I'm
            > comfortable with the usual SCA practice of making clear what's
            > research and what's something we developed that works.
            > Tchipakkan
            >
            > Don't be there when the blow lands-
            >
            > wisdom of Ælfwine
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Jane Sibley
            Hi, there! You will also want to look at the poem Sigrdrifumal for rune info. And BTW, there are quite a few books Out There on runes used in period. If you
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 24, 2008
              Hi, there!
              You will also want to look at the poem Sigrdrifumal for rune info. And BTW, there are quite a few books Out There on runes used in period. If you can read Swedish or Norwegian or Danish, you'll want to check out Norges Innskrifter med de Yngre Runer, Norges Indskrifter med de AEldre Runer, Sveriges Runeinskrifter, Danmarks Runeindskrifter. You will also want to get (Interlibrary Loan can do this) your paws on:

              Moltke, Erik: Runes and their Origins, Denmark and Elsewhere
              Jansson, Sven BF: The Runes of Sweden
              anything by RI Page

              also google runenews; go to runearkivet (University of Oslo) for the newsletter Nytt om Runer [News about Runes] and thence to the bibliography (extensive; a lot of articles etc. in English). Please *do* check this out!

              The scholars above have studied period runic inscriptions (and also have photos of same in their books); NIyR, NIaeR, SR and DR have extremely detailed reproductions & commentaries on each inscription. If you can find it, Tineke Looijenga's "Runes around the North Sea and on the Continent AD 150-700: texts & contexts" is invaluable (ISBN 90-6781-014-2) really goes into the elder futhark corpus.

              Avoid the New Age books; most of those are either "trash for cash", fictional conjectures, or woo-woo. The best of the lot is Blum; his system dates back to the late 1970s. But it *does* work and it *is* fun. Not historically accurate, but fun.

              Tacitus barely mentions "symbols" in passing; and it's not at all clear that those symbols were runes. They could just as easily have been other symbols.

              Runes meaning "a secret"...there's a paper by someone that I have in my rather large runic library suggesting that the word "rune" originally meant "scratched/incised."

              Historical sources not specific to the letter: the above authors go from the actual period runic inscriptions, which I'd say was a pretty historical source. There are quite a number of runic amulets (look for I think it's Judith Jesch's book on Runic Amulets; she has some parts that are weak, but she does present a lot of the runic amulets). Tchipakkan has a copy, and so do I (with a lot of scribbles in the margins, hehehehe).
              arwen

              hauntingflute <hauntingflute@...> wrote:
              Some of my favorite books that involve "runes" are

              The Agricola and The German, Tacitus
              The Poetic Edda (A collection of translated Norse-Icelandic mythology written as poetry)

              In the poetic Edda...the runes are talked about only as part of the story...for example
              "She will teach you powerful runes, all those which men wish to know, and how to speak
              every single human tongue, medicine with healing knowledge; may you live blessed, king!"
              (pg 145)

              Tacitus was a Roman historian and wrote one of the most in depth descriptions of how the
              Germans used "runes" but he did not use the word "rune" for example "...They cut off a
              branch of a nut-bearing tree and slice it into strips; these they mark with different signs
              and throw them completely at random..."

              Tacitus also wrote that they used the flight of birds and actions by specially kept horses as
              well.

              Some think that runes were "invented" by tribes in Northern Italy which then were taken up
              by German tribes, from there they spread all over the place...Iceland being one of the last
              "hold outs".

              Problem is...the runes are very much what their name implies "a secret"...the modern
              books that are written about runes draw from very few historical sources. And the
              historical sources themselves are not specific to the letter. I have also read a number of
              the modern books and found different interpretations for the runes between them. But,
              the general meaning was basically the same. What I have done was to read both historical
              sources, modern sources, talk with people, and work with the runes themselves. Based on
              the question and my intuition is how I conduct readings.

              --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I'm not sure I'd refer to them as New Age as such. I tend to think of
              > New Age as crystals, candles, guardian angels, aura-photography, and
              > maybe some core shamanism. I think of most of the rune books as spin-
              > offs of the pagan/heathen movement and divination. What they are,
              > mostly, is attempts by modern people to try to figure out how they
              > may have been used. Certainly they don't attempt to claim that they
              > were actually used that way in period (which is, of course, what
              > SCAers want).
              > Each author has his or her own spin. The Nazi groups had theirs,
              > Kemble had his. Freya added a feminist bias (that I might throw into
              > the NA hamper). This puts us squarely into the UPG (Unverifiable
              > Personal Gnosis) or Experiential argument. If it works for the
              > practitioner, it's hard to argue that it doesn't work. Still, the way
              > that many sorts of divination work is that you set a bunch of symbols
              > in your mind to mean something, create a random generating system for
              > those symbols, and those symbols work- even if what you have decided
              > they mean is totally different than what they meant to another group
              > of people.
              > I guess the big issue in the SCA is that unlike other people who are
              > just doing it for divination, we are also exploring history, and
              > don't have that option. If we are doing divination in any public
              > forum of an SCA event we should be able to not only have mastered the
              > technique we are using, but also be able to tell our fellow history
              > enthusiasts which parts of what we are doing we have any
              > documentation for.
              > I'm perfectly comfortable telling people that we have lots of
              > documentation for runes being used for writing and magick, but
              > exceptionally small hints to support their being used for divination.
              > And I flatly refuse to use Tarot type spreads (such as were developed
              > during the same period the SCA was being developed) for runes, rune
              > tiles, rune cards, or most of the modern permutations. I stick with
              > the system I learned from Arwen- it gives a better reading anyway. I
              > suppose I am guilty of promoting the use of "Popsicle sticks" as
              > practice tools- but I do tell people to move on to cutting their own.
              > I guess my position is that when we have holes in our knowledge, I'm
              > comfortable with the usual SCA practice of making clear what's
              > research and what's something we developed that works.
              > Tchipakkan
              >
              > Don't be there when the blow lands-
              >
              > wisdom of Ælfwine
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • hauntingflute
              I read english...and finding books on historical Rune use has been very hard...which is why I am trying to find translated copies from Roman historians. As
              Message 6 of 14 , Jun 27, 2008
                I read english...and finding books on historical Rune use has been very hard...which is why
                I am trying to find translated copies from Roman historians. As far as I know, the only
                documents that were produced which included discussions about Runes were by the
                Romans....as no once else during that time had the means, interest, or location. I have
                two books by Page "Reading the Past: Runes" and " Runes and Runic Inscriptions". They are
                both good books, but he does not have much on casting methods. He also describes
                himself as an "unimaginative" runeologist. Meaning, he was not interested in the
                "magical" uses of Runes just the historical value of a transitional alphabet. I will look into
                the book you suggested from Tineke (I use the elder futhark).

                Thanks,
                Shoshana


                --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Jane Sibley <jrsibley@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi, there!
                > You will also want to look at the poem Sigrdrifumal for rune info. And BTW, there are
                quite a few books Out There on runes used in period. If you can read Swedish or
                Norwegian or Danish, you'll want to check out Norges Innskrifter med de Yngre Runer,
                Norges Indskrifter med de AEldre Runer, Sveriges Runeinskrifter, Danmarks
                Runeindskrifter. You will also want to get (Interlibrary Loan can do this) your paws on:
                >
                > Moltke, Erik: Runes and their Origins, Denmark and Elsewhere
                > Jansson, Sven BF: The Runes of Sweden
                > anything by RI Page
                >
                > also google runenews; go to runearkivet (University of Oslo) for the newsletter Nytt om
                Runer [News about Runes] and thence to the bibliography (extensive; a lot of articles etc.
                in English). Please *do* check this out!
                >
                > The scholars above have studied period runic inscriptions (and also have photos of
                same in their books); NIyR, NIaeR, SR and DR have extremely detailed reproductions &
                commentaries on each inscription. If you can find it, Tineke Looijenga's "Runes around the
                North Sea and on the Continent AD 150-700: texts & contexts" is invaluable (ISBN 90-
                6781-014-2) really goes into the elder futhark corpus.
                >
                > Avoid the New Age books; most of those are either "trash for cash", fictional
                conjectures, or woo-woo. The best of the lot is Blum; his system dates back to the late
                1970s. But it *does* work and it *is* fun. Not historically accurate, but fun.
                >
                > Tacitus barely mentions "symbols" in passing; and it's not at all clear that those
                symbols were runes. They could just as easily have been other symbols.
                >
                > Runes meaning "a secret"...there's a paper by someone that I have in my rather large
                runic library suggesting that the word "rune" originally meant "scratched/incised."
                >
                > Historical sources not specific to the letter: the above authors go from the actual
                period runic inscriptions, which I'd say was a pretty historical source. There are quite a
                number of runic amulets (look for I think it's Judith Jesch's book on Runic Amulets; she has
                some parts that are weak, but she does present a lot of the runic amulets). Tchipakkan
                has a copy, and so do I (with a lot of scribbles in the margins, hehehehe).
                > arwen
                >
                > hauntingflute <hauntingflute@...> wrote:
                > Some of my favorite books that involve "runes" are
                >
                > The Agricola and The German, Tacitus
                > The Poetic Edda (A collection of translated Norse-Icelandic mythology written as poetry)
                >
                > In the poetic Edda...the runes are talked about only as part of the story...for example
                > "She will teach you powerful runes, all those which men wish to know, and how to speak
                > every single human tongue, medicine with healing knowledge; may you live blessed,
                king!"
                > (pg 145)
                >
                > Tacitus was a Roman historian and wrote one of the most in depth descriptions of how
                the
                > Germans used "runes" but he did not use the word "rune" for example "...They cut off a
                > branch of a nut-bearing tree and slice it into strips; these they mark with different signs
                > and throw them completely at random..."
                >
                > Tacitus also wrote that they used the flight of birds and actions by specially kept horses
                as
                > well.
                >
                > Some think that runes were "invented" by tribes in Northern Italy which then were taken
                up
                > by German tribes, from there they spread all over the place...Iceland being one of the
                last
                > "hold outs".
                >
                > Problem is...the runes are very much what their name implies "a secret"...the modern
                > books that are written about runes draw from very few historical sources. And the
                > historical sources themselves are not specific to the letter. I have also read a number of
                > the modern books and found different interpretations for the runes between them. But,
                > the general meaning was basically the same. What I have done was to read both
                historical
                > sources, modern sources, talk with people, and work with the runes themselves. Based
                on
                > the question and my intuition is how I conduct readings.
                >
                > --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Virginia Taylor
                <tchipakkan@>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > I'm not sure I'd refer to them as New Age as such. I tend to think of
                > > New Age as crystals, candles, guardian angels, aura-photography, and
                > > maybe some core shamanism. I think of most of the rune books as spin-
                > > offs of the pagan/heathen movement and divination. What they are,
                > > mostly, is attempts by modern people to try to figure out how they
                > > may have been used. Certainly they don't attempt to claim that they
                > > were actually used that way in period (which is, of course, what
                > > SCAers want).
                > > Each author has his or her own spin. The Nazi groups had theirs,
                > > Kemble had his. Freya added a feminist bias (that I might throw into
                > > the NA hamper). This puts us squarely into the UPG (Unverifiable
                > > Personal Gnosis) or Experiential argument. If it works for the
                > > practitioner, it's hard to argue that it doesn't work. Still, the way
                > > that many sorts of divination work is that you set a bunch of symbols
                > > in your mind to mean something, create a random generating system for
                > > those symbols, and those symbols work- even if what you have decided
                > > they mean is totally different than what they meant to another group
                > > of people.
                > > I guess the big issue in the SCA is that unlike other people who are
                > > just doing it for divination, we are also exploring history, and
                > > don't have that option. If we are doing divination in any public
                > > forum of an SCA event we should be able to not only have mastered the
                > > technique we are using, but also be able to tell our fellow history
                > > enthusiasts which parts of what we are doing we have any
                > > documentation for.
                > > I'm perfectly comfortable telling people that we have lots of
                > > documentation for runes being used for writing and magick, but
                > > exceptionally small hints to support their being used for divination.
                > > And I flatly refuse to use Tarot type spreads (such as were developed
                > > during the same period the SCA was being developed) for runes, rune
                > > tiles, rune cards, or most of the modern permutations. I stick with
                > > the system I learned from Arwen- it gives a better reading anyway. I
                > > suppose I am guilty of promoting the use of "Popsicle sticks" as
                > > practice tools- but I do tell people to move on to cutting their own.
                > > I guess my position is that when we have holes in our knowledge, I'm
                > > comfortable with the usual SCA practice of making clear what's
                > > research and what's something we developed that works.
                > > Tchipakkan
                > >
                > > Don't be there when the blow lands-
                > >
                > > wisdom of Ælfwine
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Jane Sibley
                Hi again! Page *is* good, but he is kinda the curmudgeon of runedom , as it were. He grudgingly sorta half-admits that runes were used in magic in his book
                Message 7 of 14 , Jul 3, 2008
                  Hi again!
                  Page *is* good, but he is kinda the "curmudgeon of runedom", as it were. He grudgingly sorta half-admits that runes were used in magic in his book Runes: Reading the Past, but you have to look for it. What documentation there is (outside of oral and family traditions) is pretty much in obscure Norwegian publications. Outside of Tacitus, who doesn't come out & actually *say* that runes were on the wood slats/pins that were tossed, most of the documented info is in Vaar Gamle Trolldomsmedisin [our ancient magic medicine], by Ingjald Reichborn-Kjennerud; I have also seen references elsewhere tucked away in journal articles. Outside of Tacitus, I don't know of any other Roman reference pointing directly to rune divination, and Tacitus is only a posssibility, not a probability.
                  arwen

                  hauntingflute <hauntingflute@...> wrote:


                  I read english...and finding books on historical Rune use has been very hard...which is why
                  I am trying to find translated copies from Roman historians. As far as I know, the only
                  documents that were produced which included discussions about Runes were by the
                  Romans....as no once else during that time had the means, interest, or location. I have
                  two books by Page "Reading the Past: Runes" and " Runes and Runic Inscriptions". They are
                  both good books, but he does not have much on casting methods. He also describes
                  himself as an "unimaginative" runeologist. Meaning, he was not interested in the
                  "magical" uses of Runes just the historical value of a transitional alphabet. I will look into
                  the book you suggested from Tineke (I use the elder futhark).

                  Thanks,
                  Shoshana

                  --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Jane Sibley <jrsibley@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi, there!
                  > You will also want to look at the poem Sigrdrifumal for rune info. And BTW, there are
                  quite a few books Out There on runes used in period. If you can read Swedish or
                  Norwegian or Danish, you'll want to check out Norges Innskrifter med de Yngre Runer,
                  Norges Indskrifter med de AEldre Runer, Sveriges Runeinskrifter, Danmarks
                  Runeindskrifter. You will also want to get (Interlibrary Loan can do this) your paws on:
                  >
                  > Moltke, Erik: Runes and their Origins, Denmark and Elsewhere
                  > Jansson, Sven BF: The Runes of Sweden
                  > anything by RI Page
                  >
                  > also google runenews; go to runearkivet (University of Oslo) for the newsletter Nytt om
                  Runer [News about Runes] and thence to the bibliography (extensive; a lot of articles etc.
                  in English). Please *do* check this out!
                  >
                  > The scholars above have studied period runic inscriptions (and also have photos of
                  same in their books); NIyR, NIaeR, SR and DR have extremely detailed reproductions &
                  commentaries on each inscription. If you can find it, Tineke Looijenga's "Runes around the
                  North Sea and on the Continent AD 150-700: texts & contexts" is invaluable (ISBN 90-
                  6781-014-2) really goes into the elder futhark corpus.
                  >
                  > Avoid the New Age books; most of those are either "trash for cash", fictional
                  conjectures, or woo-woo. The best of the lot is Blum; his system dates back to the late
                  1970s. But it *does* work and it *is* fun. Not historically accurate, but fun.
                  >
                  > Tacitus barely mentions "symbols" in passing; and it's not at all clear that those
                  symbols were runes. They could just as easily have been other symbols.
                  >
                  > Runes meaning "a secret"...there's a paper by someone that I have in my rather large
                  runic library suggesting that the word "rune" originally meant "scratched/incised."
                  >
                  > Historical sources not specific to the letter: the above authors go from the actual
                  period runic inscriptions, which I'd say was a pretty historical source. There are quite a
                  number of runic amulets (look for I think it's Judith Jesch's book on Runic Amulets; she has
                  some parts that are weak, but she does present a lot of the runic amulets). Tchipakkan
                  has a copy, and so do I (with a lot of scribbles in the margins, hehehehe).
                  > arwen
                  >
                  > hauntingflute <hauntingflute@...> wrote:
                  > Some of my favorite books that involve "runes" are
                  >
                  > The Agricola and The German, Tacitus
                  > The Poetic Edda (A collection of translated Norse-Icelandic mythology written as poetry)
                  >
                  > In the poetic Edda...the runes are talked about only as part of the story...for example
                  > "She will teach you powerful runes, all those which men wish to know, and how to speak
                  > every single human tongue, medicine with healing knowledge; may you live blessed,
                  king!"
                  > (pg 145)
                  >
                  > Tacitus was a Roman historian and wrote one of the most in depth descriptions of how
                  the
                  > Germans used "runes" but he did not use the word "rune" for example "...They cut off a
                  > branch of a nut-bearing tree and slice it into strips; these they mark with different signs
                  > and throw them completely at random..."
                  >
                  > Tacitus also wrote that they used the flight of birds and actions by specially kept horses
                  as
                  > well.
                  >
                  > Some think that runes were "invented" by tribes in Northern Italy which then were taken
                  up
                  > by German tribes, from there they spread all over the place...Iceland being one of the
                  last
                  > "hold outs".
                  >
                  > Problem is...the runes are very much what their name implies "a secret"...the modern
                  > books that are written about runes draw from very few historical sources. And the
                  > historical sources themselves are not specific to the letter. I have also read a number of
                  > the modern books and found different interpretations for the runes between them. But,
                  > the general meaning was basically the same. What I have done was to read both
                  historical
                  > sources, modern sources, talk with people, and work with the runes themselves. Based
                  on
                  > the question and my intuition is how I conduct readings.
                  >
                  > --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Virginia Taylor
                  <tchipakkan@>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I'm not sure I'd refer to them as New Age as such. I tend to think of
                  > > New Age as crystals, candles, guardian angels, aura-photography, and
                  > > maybe some core shamanism. I think of most of the rune books as spin-
                  > > offs of the pagan/heathen movement and divination. What they are,
                  > > mostly, is attempts by modern people to try to figure out how they
                  > > may have been used. Certainly they don't attempt to claim that they
                  > > were actually used that way in period (which is, of course, what
                  > > SCAers want).
                  > > Each author has his or her own spin. The Nazi groups had theirs,
                  > > Kemble had his. Freya added a feminist bias (that I might throw into
                  > > the NA hamper). This puts us squarely into the UPG (Unverifiable
                  > > Personal Gnosis) or Experiential argument. If it works for the
                  > > practitioner, it's hard to argue that it doesn't work. Still, the way
                  > > that many sorts of divination work is that you set a bunch of symbols
                  > > in your mind to mean something, create a random generating system for
                  > > those symbols, and those symbols work- even if what you have decided
                  > > they mean is totally different than what they meant to another group
                  > > of people.
                  > > I guess the big issue in the SCA is that unlike other people who are
                  > > just doing it for divination, we are also exploring history, and
                  > > don't have that option. If we are doing divination in any public
                  > > forum of an SCA event we should be able to not only have mastered the
                  > > technique we are using, but also be able to tell our fellow history
                  > > enthusiasts which parts of what we are doing we have any
                  > > documentation for.
                  > > I'm perfectly comfortable telling people that we have lots of
                  > > documentation for runes being used for writing and magick, but
                  > > exceptionally small hints to support their being used for divination.
                  > > And I flatly refuse to use Tarot type spreads (such as were developed
                  > > during the same period the SCA was being developed) for runes, rune
                  > > tiles, rune cards, or most of the modern permutations. I stick with
                  > > the system I learned from Arwen- it gives a better reading anyway. I
                  > > suppose I am guilty of promoting the use of "Popsicle sticks" as
                  > > practice tools- but I do tell people to move on to cutting their own.
                  > > I guess my position is that when we have holes in our knowledge, I'm
                  > > comfortable with the usual SCA practice of making clear what's
                  > > research and what's something we developed that works.
                  > > Tchipakkan
                  > >
                  > > Don't be there when the blow lands-
                  > >
                  > > wisdom of Ælfwine
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • hauntingflute
                  I agree.... I wish there was more out there, but I will check out the book by Ingjald. Thanks for sharing! Cheers ... grudgingly sorta half-admits that runes
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jul 10, 2008
                    I agree....

                    I wish there was more out there, but I will check out the book by Ingjald. Thanks for
                    sharing!

                    Cheers


                    --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Jane Sibley <jrsibley@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi again!
                    > Page *is* good, but he is kinda the "curmudgeon of runedom", as it were. He
                    grudgingly sorta half-admits that runes were used in magic in his book Runes: Reading
                    the Past, but you have to look for it. What documentation there is (outside of oral and
                    family traditions) is pretty much in obscure Norwegian publications. Outside of Tacitus,
                    who doesn't come out & actually *say* that runes were on the wood slats/pins that were
                    tossed, most of the documented info is in Vaar Gamle Trolldomsmedisin [our ancient
                    magic medicine], by Ingjald Reichborn-Kjennerud; I have also seen references elsewhere
                    tucked away in journal articles. Outside of Tacitus, I don't know of any other Roman
                    reference pointing directly to rune divination, and Tacitus is only a posssibility, not a
                    probability.
                    > arwen
                    >
                    > hauntingflute <hauntingflute@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > I read english...and finding books on historical Rune use has been very hard...which is
                    why
                    > I am trying to find translated copies from Roman historians. As far as I know, the only
                    > documents that were produced which included discussions about Runes were by the
                    > Romans....as no once else during that time had the means, interest, or location. I have
                    > two books by Page "Reading the Past: Runes" and " Runes and Runic Inscriptions". They
                    are
                    > both good books, but he does not have much on casting methods. He also describes
                    > himself as an "unimaginative" runeologist. Meaning, he was not interested in the
                    > "magical" uses of Runes just the historical value of a transitional alphabet. I will look
                    into
                    > the book you suggested from Tineke (I use the elder futhark).
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > Shoshana
                    >
                    > --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Jane Sibley <jrsibley@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi, there!
                    > > You will also want to look at the poem Sigrdrifumal for rune info. And BTW, there are
                    > quite a few books Out There on runes used in period. If you can read Swedish or
                    > Norwegian or Danish, you'll want to check out Norges Innskrifter med de Yngre Runer,
                    > Norges Indskrifter med de AEldre Runer, Sveriges Runeinskrifter, Danmarks
                    > Runeindskrifter. You will also want to get (Interlibrary Loan can do this) your paws on:
                    > >
                    > > Moltke, Erik: Runes and their Origins, Denmark and Elsewhere
                    > > Jansson, Sven BF: The Runes of Sweden
                    > > anything by RI Page
                    > >
                    > > also google runenews; go to runearkivet (University of Oslo) for the newsletter Nytt
                    om
                    > Runer [News about Runes] and thence to the bibliography (extensive; a lot of articles
                    etc.
                    > in English). Please *do* check this out!
                    > >
                    > > The scholars above have studied period runic inscriptions (and also have photos of
                    > same in their books); NIyR, NIaeR, SR and DR have extremely detailed reproductions &
                    > commentaries on each inscription. If you can find it, Tineke Looijenga's "Runes around
                    the
                    > North Sea and on the Continent AD 150-700: texts & contexts" is invaluable (ISBN 90-
                    > 6781-014-2) really goes into the elder futhark corpus.
                    > >
                    > > Avoid the New Age books; most of those are either "trash for cash", fictional
                    > conjectures, or woo-woo. The best of the lot is Blum; his system dates back to the late
                    > 1970s. But it *does* work and it *is* fun. Not historically accurate, but fun.
                    > >
                    > > Tacitus barely mentions "symbols" in passing; and it's not at all clear that those
                    > symbols were runes. They could just as easily have been other symbols.
                    > >
                    > > Runes meaning "a secret"...there's a paper by someone that I have in my rather large
                    > runic library suggesting that the word "rune" originally meant "scratched/incised."
                    > >
                    > > Historical sources not specific to the letter: the above authors go from the actual
                    > period runic inscriptions, which I'd say was a pretty historical source. There are quite a
                    > number of runic amulets (look for I think it's Judith Jesch's book on Runic Amulets; she
                    has
                    > some parts that are weak, but she does present a lot of the runic amulets). Tchipakkan
                    > has a copy, and so do I (with a lot of scribbles in the margins, hehehehe).
                    > > arwen
                    > >
                    > > hauntingflute <hauntingflute@> wrote:
                    > > Some of my favorite books that involve "runes" are
                    > >
                    > > The Agricola and The German, Tacitus
                    > > The Poetic Edda (A collection of translated Norse-Icelandic mythology written as
                    poetry)
                    > >
                    > > In the poetic Edda...the runes are talked about only as part of the story...for example
                    > > "She will teach you powerful runes, all those which men wish to know, and how to
                    speak
                    > > every single human tongue, medicine with healing knowledge; may you live blessed,
                    > king!"
                    > > (pg 145)
                    > >
                    > > Tacitus was a Roman historian and wrote one of the most in depth descriptions of
                    how
                    > the
                    > > Germans used "runes" but he did not use the word "rune" for example "...They cut off
                    a
                    > > branch of a nut-bearing tree and slice it into strips; these they mark with different
                    signs
                    > > and throw them completely at random..."
                    > >
                    > > Tacitus also wrote that they used the flight of birds and actions by specially kept
                    horses
                    > as
                    > > well.
                    > >
                    > > Some think that runes were "invented" by tribes in Northern Italy which then were
                    taken
                    > up
                    > > by German tribes, from there they spread all over the place...Iceland being one of the
                    > last
                    > > "hold outs".
                    > >
                    > > Problem is...the runes are very much what their name implies "a secret"...the modern
                    > > books that are written about runes draw from very few historical sources. And the
                    > > historical sources themselves are not specific to the letter. I have also read a number
                    of
                    > > the modern books and found different interpretations for the runes between them.
                    But,
                    > > the general meaning was basically the same. What I have done was to read both
                    > historical
                    > > sources, modern sources, talk with people, and work with the runes themselves.
                    Based
                    > on
                    > > the question and my intuition is how I conduct readings.
                    > >
                    > > --- In eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com, Virginia Taylor
                    > <tchipakkan@>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > I'm not sure I'd refer to them as New Age as such. I tend to think of
                    > > > New Age as crystals, candles, guardian angels, aura-photography, and
                    > > > maybe some core shamanism. I think of most of the rune books as spin-
                    > > > offs of the pagan/heathen movement and divination. What they are,
                    > > > mostly, is attempts by modern people to try to figure out how they
                    > > > may have been used. Certainly they don't attempt to claim that they
                    > > > were actually used that way in period (which is, of course, what
                    > > > SCAers want).
                    > > > Each author has his or her own spin. The Nazi groups had theirs,
                    > > > Kemble had his. Freya added a feminist bias (that I might throw into
                    > > > the NA hamper). This puts us squarely into the UPG (Unverifiable
                    > > > Personal Gnosis) or Experiential argument. If it works for the
                    > > > practitioner, it's hard to argue that it doesn't work. Still, the way
                    > > > that many sorts of divination work is that you set a bunch of symbols
                    > > > in your mind to mean something, create a random generating system for
                    > > > those symbols, and those symbols work- even if what you have decided
                    > > > they mean is totally different than what they meant to another group
                    > > > of people.
                    > > > I guess the big issue in the SCA is that unlike other people who are
                    > > > just doing it for divination, we are also exploring history, and
                    > > > don't have that option. If we are doing divination in any public
                    > > > forum of an SCA event we should be able to not only have mastered the
                    > > > technique we are using, but also be able to tell our fellow history
                    > > > enthusiasts which parts of what we are doing we have any
                    > > > documentation for.
                    > > > I'm perfectly comfortable telling people that we have lots of
                    > > > documentation for runes being used for writing and magick, but
                    > > > exceptionally small hints to support their being used for divination.
                    > > > And I flatly refuse to use Tarot type spreads (such as were developed
                    > > > during the same period the SCA was being developed) for runes, rune
                    > > > tiles, rune cards, or most of the modern permutations. I stick with
                    > > > the system I learned from Arwen- it gives a better reading anyway. I
                    > > > suppose I am guilty of promoting the use of "Popsicle sticks" as
                    > > > practice tools- but I do tell people to move on to cutting their own.
                    > > > I guess my position is that when we have holes in our knowledge, I'm
                    > > > comfortable with the usual SCA practice of making clear what's
                    > > > research and what's something we developed that works.
                    > > > Tchipakkan
                    > > >
                    > > > Don't be there when the blow lands-
                    > > >
                    > > > wisdom of Ælfwine
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • Jane Sibley
                    Hi, Shoshana! Ingjald Reichborn-Kjennerud primarily published in scholarly journals, in Norwegian. I have copies, how is your Norwegian? Vaar Gamle
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jul 14, 2008
                      Hi, Shoshana!
                      Ingjald Reichborn-Kjennerud primarily published in scholarly journals, in Norwegian. I have copies, how is your Norwegian? Vaar Gamle Trolldomsmedisin was published in 5 installments in a journal; would have to dig up the references. I've been working on doing a rough translation into English; mostly it's on folk/magic medicine, but there are a few bits on runes scattered here & there. Most of the divination lore is not in English.

                      yeah, I really *do* have to get going on a book dealing with traditional Norse divination...
                      RSN...
                      arwen




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jeanne Wardwell
                      ... And we ve been telling you this for _how_ many years?! :) Morwenna
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jul 14, 2008
                        On 14 Jul 2008 at 20:56, Jane Sibley wrote:

                        > yeah, I really *do* have to get going on a book dealing with traditional Norse divination...
                        > RSN...
                        > arwen
                        >
                        And we've been telling you this for _how_ many years?! :)

                        Morwenna
                      • Virginia Taylor
                        ... traditional Norse divination... ... Note that she said traditional Norse divination , this does not to me sound like she plans to get that rune book out
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jul 15, 2008
                          On 14 Jul 2008 at 20:56, Jane Sibley wrote:

                          > yeah, I really *do* have to get going on a book dealing with
                          traditional Norse divination...
                          > RSN...
                          > arwen
                          > Morwenna wrote:
                          > And we've been telling you this for _how_ many years?! :)

                          Note that she said "traditional Norse divination", this does not to
                          me sound like she plans to get that rune book out yet, but might be a
                          collection of "traditional", including old techniques like utsita
                          but also ones maybe only 4 or 5 centuries old, like the form of rune
                          casting she's taught and swedish cards etc. Am I right Arwen?

                          Tchipakkan

                          It is a trade secret, but I'll tell you anyway, all healing is self-
                          healing.

                          -- Albert Schweitzer





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Jane Sibley
                          Hi, Tchipakkan! Yep, and also other forms of early period Norse divination. I did send an article to Elena a longish while ago for her to post on the Guild
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jul 21, 2008
                            Hi, Tchipakkan!
                            Yep, and also other forms of early period Norse divination. I did send an article to Elena a longish while ago for her to post on the Guild list; haven't seen it yet. Nor the Celtic divination one I wrote years ago. Elena????

                            Right now, am muscling the final bits to get "The Divine Thunderbolt" and "The Hammer of the Smith" out and available for purchase. The Thunderbolt book: display copies will be available at Pennsic, one at Tchipakkan's booth, and one at mine. If I can find out from the publisher how much those will cost (probably plenty; the book is over 400 pages long!) and how much it weighs, I can take orders for it, to be shipped later. Not sure if the review copies of "Hammer" will make it to Pennsic. That one is about 150 pages, more or less. Traditional lead-casting divination is described in one chapter. "Hammer" is a novel; "Tbolt" is a scholarly book; I do have bits on thunder augury/divination therein.
                            arwen


                            Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...> wrote:

                            On 14 Jul 2008 at 20:56, Jane Sibley wrote:

                            > yeah, I really *do* have to get going on a book dealing with
                            traditional Norse divination...
                            > RSN...
                            > arwen
                            > Morwenna wrote:
                            > And we've been telling you this for _how_ many years?! :)

                            Note that she said "traditional Norse divination", this does not to
                            me sound like she plans to get that rune book out yet, but might be a
                            collection of "traditional", including old techniques like utsita
                            but also ones maybe only 4 or 5 centuries old, like the form of rune
                            casting she's taught and swedish cards etc. Am I right Arwen?

                            Tchipakkan

                            It is a trade secret, but I'll tell you anyway, all healing is self-
                            healing.

                            -- Albert Schweitzer

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Jane Sibley
                            Hiya, Wenna! (hanging head in shame)...yep, I do gotta get that written. RSN. After the Tbolt book and Hammer come out, then I continue on the traditional
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jul 21, 2008
                              Hiya, Wenna!
                              (hanging head in shame)...yep, I do gotta get that written. RSN. After the Tbolt book and "Hammer" come out, then I continue on the traditional Norse magic/folk medicine book. Maybe I *should* do the rune use/divination one first; wonder who'd be up to publishing it? Looking for mainstream; and not Llewellyn.
                              arwen

                              Jeanne Wardwell <jcwardwell@...> wrote:
                              On 14 Jul 2008 at 20:56, Jane Sibley wrote:

                              > yeah, I really *do* have to get going on a book dealing with traditional Norse divination...
                              > RSN...
                              > arwen
                              >
                              And we've been telling you this for _how_ many years?! :)

                              Morwenna





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Catherine Kane
                              Borders books has just opened a pilot program for publishing/ print on demand in co-operation w/ Lulu .com. I m thinking the palmistry course I m running is
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jul 22, 2008
                                Borders books has just opened a pilot program for publishing/ print on demand in co-operation w/ Lulu .com.
                                I'm thinking the palmistry course I'm running is about to become a book....
                                Catherine du Fay

                                Jane Sibley <jrsibley@...> wrote:
                                Hiya, Wenna!
                                (hanging head in shame)...yep, I do gotta get that written. RSN. After the Tbolt book and "Hammer" come out, then I continue on the traditional Norse magic/folk medicine book. Maybe I *should* do the rune use/divination one first; wonder who'd be up to publishing it? Looking for mainstream; and not Llewellyn.
                                arwen

                                Jeanne Wardwell <jcwardwell@...> wrote:
                                On 14 Jul 2008 at 20:56, Jane Sibley wrote:

                                > yeah, I really *do* have to get going on a book dealing with traditional Norse divination...
                                > RSN...
                                > arwen
                                >
                                And we've been telling you this for _how_ many years?! :)

                                Morwenna

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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