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Mark on your palm?

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  • Virginia Taylor
    I recently tripped over a palmar mark which I d never before encountered in any book (although I have one) and would like to find out how common it is. (I ll
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 3, 2008
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      I recently tripped over a palmar mark which I'd never before
      encountered in any
      book (although I have one) and would like to find out how common it
      is. (I'll explain
      after I've gotten responses.) Look on your palms (either hand) right
      under the ring finger.
      What I'm looking for is a line that ends in a tassle or small group
      of 4 or 5 lines like
      a broom. If you know other groups who might be interested in helping
      me with this, feel free to
      pass the question on, and have them send me their "yes, I have a
      broom under my ring
      finger" or "no, I don't" to Tchipakkan@...
      Arastorm


      Mules make a great fuss about their ancestors having been horses.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dicconf
      ... I have it on both hands, I think, but they could be described as two-ended tassels. The one on my left hand is probably closer to what you described. I m
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 3, 2008
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        On Thu, 3 Jan 2008, Virginia Taylor wrote:

        > I recently tripped over a palmar mark which I'd never before encountered
        > in any book (although I have one) and would like to find out how common
        > it is. (I'll explain after I've gotten responses.) Look on your palms
        > (either hand) right under the ring finger. What I'm looking for is a
        > line that ends in a tassle or small group of 4 or 5 lines like a broom.
        > If you know other groups who might be interested in helping me with
        > this, feel free to pass the question on, and have them send me their
        > "yes, I have a broom under my ring finger" or "no, I don't" to
        > Tchipakkan@... Arastorm

        I have it on both hands, I think, but they could be described as
        two-ended tassels. The one on my left hand is probably closer to
        what you described. I'm right-handed.

        =Tamar
      • dr. jeanne
        I have a big broom under the ring finger of my left hand (I am right-handed) and a less distinct one on the right hand with fewer lines. Sulis To:
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 3, 2008
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          I have a big broom under the ring finger of my left hand (I am right-handed)
          and a less distinct one on the right hand with fewer lines.
          Sulis


          To: eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.comFrom: dicconf@...: Thu, 3 Jan 2008 19:48:03 -0500Subject: Re: [EK Sooth Guild] Mark on your palm?




          On Thu, 3 Jan 2008, Virginia Taylor wrote:> I recently tripped over a palmar mark which I'd never before encountered > in any book (although I have one) and would like to find out how common > it is. (I'll explain after I've gotten responses.) Look on your palms > (either hand) right under the ring finger. What I'm looking for is a > line that ends in a tassle or small group of 4 or 5 lines like a broom. > If you know other groups who might be interested in helping me with > this, feel free to pass the question on, and have them send me their > "yes, I have a broom under my ring finger" or "no, I don't" to > Tchipakkan@... ArastormI have it on both hands, I think, but they could be described astwo-ended tassels. The one on my left hand is probably closer towhat you described. I'm right-handed.=Tamar






          _________________________________________________________________
          Get the power of Windows + Web with the new Windows Live.
          http://www.windowslive.com?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_Wave2_powerofwindows_122007

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Catherine Kane
          do you mean a broom that is extending vertically from the base of palm up to end under ring finger(fameline) or horizontally(heart line) or some other
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 3, 2008
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            do you mean a "broom'" that is extending vertically from the base of palm up to end under ring finger(fameline) or horizontally(heart line) or some other configuration
            catherine du fay

            Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...> wrote:
            I recently tripped over a palmar mark which I'd never before
            encountered in any
            book (although I have one) and would like to find out how common it
            is. (I'll explain
            after I've gotten responses.) Look on your palms (either hand) right
            under the ring finger.
            What I'm looking for is a line that ends in a tassle or small group
            of 4 or 5 lines like
            a broom. If you know other groups who might be interested in helping
            me with this, feel free to
            pass the question on, and have them send me their "yes, I have a
            broom under my ring
            finger" or "no, I don't" to Tchipakkan@...
            Arastorm

            Mules make a great fuss about their ancestors having been horses.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Catherine Kane
            just a bit of info-the lines on your non-dominant hand are the potential you were born w/ + on your dominant,what you re doing w/ it... catherine du fay dr.
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 3, 2008
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              just a bit of info-the lines on your non-dominant hand are the potential you were born w/ + on your dominant,what you're doing w/ it...
              catherine du fay

              "dr. jeanne" <drjeanne6@...> wrote:

              I have a big broom under the ring finger of my left hand (I am right-handed)
              and a less distinct one on the right hand with fewer lines.
              Sulis

              To: eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.comFrom: dicconf@...: Thu, 3 Jan 2008 19:48:03 -0500Subject: Re: [EK Sooth Guild] Mark on your palm?

              On Thu, 3 Jan 2008, Virginia Taylor wrote:> I recently tripped over a palmar mark which I'd never before encountered > in any book (although I have one) and would like to find out how common > it is. (I'll explain after I've gotten responses.) Look on your palms > (either hand) right under the ring finger. What I'm looking for is a > line that ends in a tassle or small group of 4 or 5 lines like a broom. > If you know other groups who might be interested in helping me with > this, feel free to pass the question on, and have them send me their > "yes, I have a broom under my ring finger" or "no, I don't" to > Tchipakkan@... ArastormI have it on both hands, I think, but they could be described astwo-ended tassels. The one on my left hand is probably closer towhat you described. I'm right-handed.=Tamar

              __________________________________________________________
              Get the power of Windows + Web with the new Windows Live.
              http://www.windowslive.com?ocid=TXT_TAGHM_Wave2_powerofwindows_122007

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Catherine Kane
              ooppss! realize that may have come across unintentionally as condiscending(I know you know what a heart line is) when I m meaning to be more descriptive so i
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 3, 2008
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                ooppss!
                realize that may have come across unintentionally as condiscending(I know you know what a heart line is) when I'm meaning to be more descriptive so i understand the question
                so what are we lookin at here?
                cat du fay
                Catherine Kane <ckane01@...> wrote:
                do you mean a "broom'" that is extending vertically from the base of palm up to end under ring finger(fameline) or horizontally(heart line) or some other configuration
                catherine du fay

                Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...> wrote:
                I recently tripped over a palmar mark which I'd never before
                encountered in any
                book (although I have one) and would like to find out how common it
                is. (I'll explain
                after I've gotten responses.) Look on your palms (either hand) right
                under the ring finger.
                What I'm looking for is a line that ends in a tassle or small group
                of 4 or 5 lines like
                a broom. If you know other groups who might be interested in helping
                me with this, feel free to
                pass the question on, and have them send me their "yes, I have a
                broom under my ring
                finger" or "no, I don't" to Tchipakkan@...
                Arastorm

                Mules make a great fuss about their ancestors having been horses.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Aisin-gioro Biya
                i can t tell whether I do or not, honestly, knowing nothing of palmistry. maybe the simple answer is that I probably don t have one since I cannot find
                Message 7 of 13 , Jan 3, 2008
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                  i can't tell whether I do or not, honestly, knowing nothing of
                  palmistry. maybe the simple answer is that I probably don't have one
                  since I cannot find anything that obviously looks like the way I
                  imagine from the description.


                  --
                  Lady Biya
                  Aisin-gioro Biya Fujin
                  Company of Medieval Aviculturists
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scaparrots
                • Virginia Taylor
                  I know that we have lots of talented soothsayers on the list and just because you ve studied one system, you may not be aware of other systems- hence the
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jan 4, 2008
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                    I know that we have lots of talented soothsayers on the list and just
                    because you've studied one system, you may not be aware of other
                    systems- hence the simplicity of the original post- saying Ring
                    Finger rather than Mount of Apollo which palmists would understand.
                    In theory the broom is the mark of an herbalist. I'm not sure what it
                    would mean if it's double ended, but it certainly wouldn't be
                    horizontal.
                    I'll be putting up what I've got on the list in a few days, I didn't
                    want to skew the results by telling people before they looked.
                    I also sent the same query over to the SCA herbalists as I figured
                    they'd have a bunch of herbalists, and so the mark should be fairly
                    common there. I got a couple dozen responses to that one post, so I'm
                    leaning toward accepting it as a sign of an herbalist.
                    On the other hand, we have to examine the whole "how does it work?"
                    question. Why, for example, would the tools (herbs) a healer used
                    make a difference in the sign on his or her hands? This was discussed
                    as the variation on "the healers mark" or "physician's stigmata"-
                    which is a cluster of vertical lines between the mounts of mercury
                    and apollo.
                    Palmists often read vertical lines on mount of mercury as children-
                    traditionally they suggested that you could differentiate between
                    sons and daughters by how long or deep these lines were. At the same
                    time, most agree that adopted and fostered children- even kids you
                    work with and come to love- show up there, and that some men who
                    don't care about their kids don't have them show up at all. This is
                    similar to the way the "marriage lines" don't mean marriage as legal
                    situation, but a sign of a passion- some even say that such lines
                    would mark a relationship with one's career (for example, the
                    Enterprise would show up as a marriage line on Captain Kirk's hand).
                    So if it moves over closer to Apollo, then it means you take care of
                    people. Would this mean that only a handful of cases show up- or that
                    they "stand for" the many people the healer cared for over his
                    career? Certainly in my experience, the children do tend to all show
                    up- with extras (but how unlikely is it that a woman come to care for
                    some of her kids friends?). I will admit that it would be hard to fit
                    all the cases a healer really cares about on his or her hand if you
                    include the whole hand.
                    Frankly, I find palmistry really good at showing character, and not
                    so good at predicting events. And I still come back to - what
                    difference does it make in the character? A line of apollo- which is
                    the line aimed at the finger relates somehow to the "brilliance" or
                    "passion" of the person. I guess an herbalist might be more
                    interested in the natural world. Any time a line is made up of
                    several other lines that feed into it, it would indicate a
                    combination of influences- thus perhaps the person marked as an
                    herbalist is one who has a passion for healing (the saxons called the
                    ring finger the leech finger) but who has a broader world view and
                    combined many areas of study into one passion. This would be more a
                    mark of the eclectic student, or perhaps the person who these days
                    uses complimentary/alternative therapies. Most of the ones I've known
                    do combine many studies.
                    If we look at older books we find references to things like "this
                    mark refers to carriages" or "horses" whereas when we see it now we
                    would be more likely to see it as generic travel. We do tend to see
                    it through cultural filters. I do believe that palmistry works- which
                    is why I've been reading a lot of books on Indian and Chinese
                    palmistry recently. The Chinese system is very into the medical
                    diagnoses. I think there's a lot to the connection between
                    personality and disease, so that appeals to me. The tracking events
                    part is more of a mystery. I'm not sure how it works, so I tend to be
                    more and more skeptical about it, even as I become more and more
                    secure in the psychological profile/medical utility of palmistry.
                    Of course, now I have to go back to the books and see if I can figure
                    out what a "broom" with tassles on both ends might mean. Of course-
                    off the top of my head, it looks like the "thunderbolt" symbol from
                    Arwen's book (just as the healers mark looks like the Awen symbol of
                    the druids). Symbols are so fascinating.

                    Tchipakkan
                    known to banks as: Virginia Fair Richards-Taylor

                    known in the SCA as: Arastorm the Golden

                    known in Rhuddlan as: Ælfgifu of Hawarden

                    known in Nova Roma as: Aurelia Ambrosia

                    known in family as Mother





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Brenda
                    Thanks, from one who is not a palmist - yet (?). But Druid, yes. Brenda (Eolande Brana-Faolan) /| ... From: Virginia Taylor To: EK
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jan 4, 2008
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                      Thanks, from one who is not a palmist - yet (?). But Druid, yes.


                      Brenda
                      (Eolande Brana-Faolan)
                      /|\




                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...>
                      To: EK Soothsayers Guild <eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Friday, January 4, 2008 1:39:49 PM
                      Subject: [EK Sooth Guild] Re: Mark on your palm?

                      I know that we have lots of talented soothsayers on the list and just
                      because you've studied one system, you may not be aware of other
                      systems- hence the simplicity of the original post- saying Ring
                      Finger rather than Mount of Apollo which palmists would understand.
                      In theory the broom is the mark of an herbalist. I'm not sure what it
                      would mean if it's double ended, but it certainly wouldn't be
                      horizontal.
                      I'll be putting up what I've got on the list in a few days, I didn't
                      want to skew the results by telling people before they looked.
                      I also sent the same query over to the SCA herbalists as I figured
                      they'd have a bunch of herbalists, and so the mark should be fairly
                      common there. I got a couple dozen responses to that one post, so I'm
                      leaning toward accepting it as a sign of an herbalist.
                      On the other hand, we have to examine the whole "how does it work?"
                      question. Why, for example, would the tools (herbs) a healer used
                      make a difference in the sign on his or her hands? This was discussed
                      as the variation on "the healers mark" or "physician's stigmata"-
                      which is a cluster of vertical lines between the mounts of mercury
                      and apollo.
                      Palmists often read vertical lines on mount of mercury as children-
                      traditionally they suggested that you could differentiate between
                      sons and daughters by how long or deep these lines were. At the same
                      time, most agree that adopted and fostered children- even kids you
                      work with and come to love- show up there, and that some men who
                      don't care about their kids don't have them show up at all. This is
                      similar to the way the "marriage lines" don't mean marriage as legal
                      situation, but a sign of a passion- some even say that such lines
                      would mark a relationship with one's career (for example, the
                      Enterprise would show up as a marriage line on Captain Kirk's hand).
                      So if it moves over closer to Apollo, then it means you take care of
                      people. Would this mean that only a handful of cases show up- or that
                      they "stand for" the many people the healer cared for over his
                      career? Certainly in my experience, the children do tend to all show
                      up- with extras (but how unlikely is it that a woman come to care for
                      some of her kids friends?). I will admit that it would be hard to fit
                      all the cases a healer really cares about on his or her hand if you
                      include the whole hand.
                      Frankly, I find palmistry really good at showing character, and not
                      so good at predicting events. And I still come back to - what
                      difference does it make in the character? A line of apollo- which is
                      the line aimed at the finger relates somehow to the "brilliance" or
                      "passion" of the person. I guess an herbalist might be more
                      interested in the natural world. Any time a line is made up of
                      several other lines that feed into it, it would indicate a
                      combination of influences- thus perhaps the person marked as an
                      herbalist is one who has a passion for healing (the saxons called the
                      ring finger the leech finger) but who has a broader world view and
                      combined many areas of study into one passion. This would be more a
                      mark of the eclectic student, or perhaps the person who these days
                      uses complimentary/ alternative therapies. Most of the ones I've known
                      do combine many studies.
                      If we look at older books we find references to things like "this
                      mark refers to carriages" or "horses" whereas when we see it now we
                      would be more likely to see it as generic travel. We do tend to see
                      it through cultural filters. I do believe that palmistry works- which
                      is why I've been reading a lot of books on Indian and Chinese
                      palmistry recently. The Chinese system is very into the medical
                      diagnoses. I think there's a lot to the connection between
                      personality and disease, so that appeals to me. The tracking events
                      part is more of a mystery. I'm not sure how it works, so I tend to be
                      more and more skeptical about it, even as I become more and more
                      secure in the psychological profile/medical utility of palmistry.
                      Of course, now I have to go back to the books and see if I can figure
                      out what a "broom" with tassles on both ends might mean. Of course-
                      off the top of my head, it looks like the "thunderbolt" symbol from
                      Arwen's book (just as the healers mark looks like the Awen symbol of
                      the druids). Symbols are so fascinating.

                      Tchipakkan
                      known to banks as: Virginia Fair Richards-Taylor

                      known in the SCA as: Arastorm the Golden

                      known in Rhuddlan as: Ælfgifu of Hawarden

                      known in Nova Roma as: Aurelia Ambrosia

                      known in family as Mother

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jeanne Wardwell
                      On my right hand there s an Apollo line that, about a half inch short of the ring, veers off to the space between the Apollo and Mercury fingers. ???
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jan 4, 2008
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                        On my right hand there's an Apollo line that, about a half inch short
                        of the "ring," veers off to the space between the Apollo and Mercury
                        fingers.

                        ???

                        Morwenna
                      • Virginia Taylor
                        OK- the broom was mentioned in one of my books. I remember it was the first book I ve found it mentioned in- and I m still not locating which book it was- I ve
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jan 5, 2008
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                          OK- the broom was mentioned in one of my books. I remember it was the
                          first book I've found it mentioned in- and I'm still not locating
                          which book it was- I've flipped through everyone of my books about
                          palmistry books I can find today. (I tend to take a pile of books and
                          look through all of them and compare what they say on one subject,
                          rather than read any of them through.) This mark I've only seen
                          mentioned this once, and the author mentioned that it's something he
                          only sees occasionally, but always on the hands of those with herb
                          gardens. It was mentioned as an aside on the sign of "medical
                          stigmata"- which is 3-5 vertical parallel lines between the ring
                          finger and pinky, and marks someone who is likely to go into medicine
                          or other helping. Apparently this "broom" is similar, but
                          specifically for herb users. I thought that was cool and sent it on
                          to the SCA herbalists list, and a couple other herbalist lists, and
                          got back a huge response- about three dozen wrote me directly.
                          I was taken by this because I have the mark and have never seen it
                          mentioned before. I'll say it's a sign or mark, rather than a mark ON
                          a line (of Apollo- the line that runs from the center of the hand
                          toward the ring finger), although it's very difficult to distinguish
                          it from a very short line of Apollo with a group of lines leading
                          into it. A tassel or many small lines going off a major one dissipate
                          it's energy. But I think this is not a tassel but it's a sign (like a
                          square or star) so it probably symbolizes gathering energies in and
                          focusing them together into the line (lines tend to go in the
                          direction of the fingers) rather than a tassle on a short Apollo
                          which would have the fringe up at the finger end.
                          For the non-palmists on the list, I'll mention that if a line splits
                          in two- that's a fork- and indicates that whatever the influence
                          noted by a line is is divided. You can also have a trident- two lines
                          off the line, one on each side. That can be a separate mark (also
                          called a birds foot) or the end of a line, or it can end in a tassel
                          if it has lots of fine lines at the end.
                          A few people have written me that they have a mark where there's a
                          "tassel" on both ends of a short line under their ring finger. If it
                          has no lines coming into or going out of it from elsewhere, that
                          would probably be a dorje/vajra- the Hindu thunderbolt of
                          enlightenment. Of course, the "medical stigmata" look a lot like the
                          druid "Awen"- that's the thing about symbols, they can mean so many
                          things. I might describe this "herbalists sign" as a bundle of herbs
                          hung to dry- if there were a good one word description rather than a
                          broom. One does like to have the word reflect the meaning.
                          Anyway- thanks to all the herbalists who answered. I'd never seen
                          the broom on anyone but myself before, and now I feel fairly
                          confident that which ever book it was in, they got it right; it's
                          nice to know what it means. I'll keep looking through the books- I
                          know I saw it in one of them. The problem is that it's not in the
                          index- probably because it was a two line throw-away.
                          Arastorm

                          "Man's mind stretched to a new idea never goes back to its original
                          dimensions." Oliver Wendell Holmes

                          The Encyclopedia of Palmistry by Edward D. Campbell (1996). I can
                          heartily recommend it, although the style is somewhat less readable
                          (although more convincing) because he constantly refers to other
                          writers. He has a bibliography of over a hundred books (some of which
                          I'm going to have to go looking for, sigh), and a great deal about
                          the history of palmistry (some of which I've already posted).
                          Sadly, I found it while reading a pile of my palmistry books going
                          through comparing what each said about a given sign, and I'm not
                          finding it. x

                          Tchipakkan
                          True wisdom is less presuming than folly. The wise man doubteth
                          often, and changeth his mind; the fool is obstinate, and doubteth
                          not; he knoweth all things but his own ignorance.- Akhenaton




                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Brenda
                          Thanks for the info. Brenda (Eolande Brana-Faolan) /| ... From: Virginia Taylor To: EK Soothsayers Guild
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jan 5, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Thanks for the info.

                            Brenda
                            (Eolande Brana-Faolan)
                            /|\




                            ----- Original Message ----
                            From: Virginia Taylor <tchipakkan@...>
                            To: EK Soothsayers Guild <eastkingdomsoothsayersguild@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Saturday, January 5, 2008 5:40:59 PM
                            Subject: [EK Sooth Guild] Re: Mark on your palm?

                            OK- the broom was mentioned in one of my books. I remember it was the
                            first book I've found it mentioned in- and I'm still not locating
                            which book it was- I've flipped through everyone of my books about
                            palmistry books I can find today. (I tend to take a pile of books and
                            look through all of them and compare what they say on one subject,
                            rather than read any of them through.) This mark I've only seen
                            mentioned this once, and the author mentioned that it's something he
                            only sees occasionally, but always on the hands of those with herb
                            gardens. It was mentioned as an aside on the sign of "medical
                            stigmata"- which is 3-5 vertical parallel lines between the ring
                            finger and pinky, and marks someone who is likely to go into medicine
                            or other helping. Apparently this "broom" is similar, but
                            specifically for herb users. I thought that was cool and sent it on
                            to the SCA herbalists list, and a couple other herbalist lists, and
                            got back a huge response- about three dozen wrote me directly.
                            I was taken by this because I have the mark and have never seen it
                            mentioned before. I'll say it's a sign or mark, rather than a mark ON
                            a line (of Apollo- the line that runs from the center of the hand
                            toward the ring finger), although it's very difficult to distinguish
                            it from a very short line of Apollo with a group of lines leading
                            into it. A tassel or many small lines going off a major one dissipate
                            it's energy. But I think this is not a tassel but it's a sign (like a
                            square or star) so it probably symbolizes gathering energies in and
                            focusing them together into the line (lines tend to go in the
                            direction of the fingers) rather than a tassle on a short Apollo
                            which would have the fringe up at the finger end.
                            For the non-palmists on the list, I'll mention that if a line splits
                            in two- that's a fork- and indicates that whatever the influence
                            noted by a line is is divided. You can also have a trident- two lines
                            off the line, one on each side. That can be a separate mark (also
                            called a birds foot) or the end of a line, or it can end in a tassel
                            if it has lots of fine lines at the end.
                            A few people have written me that they have a mark where there's a
                            "tassel" on both ends of a short line under their ring finger. If it
                            has no lines coming into or going out of it from elsewhere, that
                            would probably be a dorje/vajra- the Hindu thunderbolt of
                            enlightenment. Of course, the "medical stigmata" look a lot like the
                            druid "Awen"- that's the thing about symbols, they can mean so many
                            things. I might describe this "herbalists sign" as a bundle of herbs
                            hung to dry- if there were a good one word description rather than a
                            broom. One does like to have the word reflect the meaning.
                            Anyway- thanks to all the herbalists who answered. I'd never seen
                            the broom on anyone but myself before, and now I feel fairly
                            confident that which ever book it was in, they got it right; it's
                            nice to know what it means. I'll keep looking through the books- I
                            know I saw it in one of them. The problem is that it's not in the
                            index- probably because it was a two line throw-away.
                            Arastorm

                            "Man's mind stretched to a new idea never goes back to its original
                            dimensions." Oliver Wendell Holmes

                            The Encyclopedia of Palmistry by Edward D. Campbell (1996). I can
                            heartily recommend it, although the style is somewhat less readable
                            (although more convincing) because he constantly refers to other
                            writers. He has a bibliography of over a hundred books (some of which
                            I'm going to have to go looking for, sigh), and a great deal about
                            the history of palmistry (some of which I've already posted).
                            Sadly, I found it while reading a pile of my palmistry books going
                            through comparing what each said about a given sign, and I'm not
                            finding it. x

                            Tchipakkan
                            True wisdom is less presuming than folly. The wise man doubteth
                            often, and changeth his mind; the fool is obstinate, and doubteth
                            not; he knoweth all things but his own ignorance.- Akhenaton

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                          • Virginia Taylor
                            It WAS in The Encyclopedia of Palmistry! (I was so frustrated I just kept looking until I found it.) As it was a side note, there wasn t much more than I ve
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jan 6, 2008
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                              It WAS in The Encyclopedia of Palmistry! (I was so frustrated I just
                              kept looking until I found it.)
                              As it was a side note, there wasn't much more than I've already
                              mentioned- but I am now deeply into thinking about what creates the
                              patterns that lead palmists to come up with these very concrete
                              "predictions" using the lines on the palm- which, my my understanding
                              are simply reflections of character/emotional state/ etc. Why would
                              one mark mean a vehicular accident or another an interest in herbs?
                              It seems to me that the character behind the physical incident- the
                              herbalist prefers to work in an integrated manner with the rest of
                              the world- and so the same mark would equally apply to a Reiki
                              practitioner or masseur, but the people the individual palmist had
                              encountered (and perhaps anecdotes of his teachers) would lead him to
                              accept the more specific interpretation. I think giving the more
                              general reading would result in a better reading- of course it would
                              open one up to the common charge that if one is general enough, the
                              same reading will do for everyone: ("You enjoy being with people you
                              like, but sometimes you really need to be alone.") Yet, there is a
                              distinct difference between the person who gets into the details and
                              a person who tends to work on the broad picture, between the dreamer
                              and the practical one, and these are shown as different types of hands.
                              What is it that makes an herbalist (showing the broom on apollo)
                              different from the doctor (with the medical stigmata between mercury
                              and apollo)? Somehow they grow these different marks on their hands-
                              why? I don't believe all the palmists out there are imagining the
                              patterns we see, even if we still argue about them. I do believe that
                              the more we test and investigate- the more scientific our study of
                              palmistry is- the better we'll get at it.
                              No one finds it strange that a person's face gets red when he gets
                              upset. People are not surprised when someone with liver problems is
                              yellow, or lung problems is slightly blue. Palmistry is just going
                              some steps further in learning to read the signs that help us
                              understand our bodies and how our lives create them. There's a reason
                              circles and crosses and other lines appear on hands- and it's not so
                              someone can say "cross my palm with silver", any more than when a
                              plant wilts you know it needs water or there's some other reason it's
                              not standing straight.
                              And why does card reading work? And runes?
                              Comeon, I can't be the only one who wonders about these things...
                              Tchipakkan

                              If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish
                              thing.

                              -- Anatole France





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