Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [earlyflute] Re: Hello Everyone!

Expand Messages
  • manuel torres
    Thank you Philippe for your kind reply, I will take your advice to heart, i know that attaining correct intonation is not so easy and that i will have to run
    Message 1 of 8 , May 1, 2009
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you Philippe for your kind reply,

      I will take your advice to heart, i know that attaining correct intonation is not so easy and that i will have to run through a number of flutes to get it right. However, the prospect of eventually succeeding is exciting for me and i know that it will bring me immense satisfaction. Thank you once again!

      regards,

      Manolo

      --- On Fri, 1/5/09, Philippe Allain-Dupré <allain-dupre@...> wrote:

      From: Philippe Allain-Dupré <allain-dupre@...>
      Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Re: Hello Everyone!
      To: earlyflute@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, 1 May, 2009, 2:42 AM

      HI André and Manuel
      Yes Renaissance flute making is not so easy than it appears.
      If you think the cylindrical bore will be easier to make than a conical bore, then you have to be sure of your craftmanship :
      The mouthhole and the 6 holes are drilled on the same piece of wood  at least 600mm long. Don't miss one!
      Making the flute in two parts generates many tuning problems, the very thin tenon usually shrinks.
      Good luck
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 4:58 AM
      Subject: [earlyflute] Re: Hello Everyone!

      Hi, Manuel!

      The plan on YouTube you´re referring to is probably one that was posted by Filadelfio Puglisi, an excellent italian maker and a very serious researcher of renaissance flutes - if he posted a plan, it must be very sound stuff, even if in a somewhat simplified form, perhaps. He has also written a book, published by SPES ("The renaissance flutes in italy") with detailed plans for just about every reanissance flute to be found in Italy. And, of course, Phillipe Allain-Dupré is another great expert and performer on renaissance flutes, he has an outstanding website on everything related to these instruments - visit it, by all means! Filadelfio himself (a fantastic fellow by the way) recommended Phillipe´s book and articles to me on the highest terms - so, I guess that with these two specialists you will be in very good company when trying your hand at making renaissance tenors. But, just heed Filadelfio´s comment on his book (I´m sure Phillipe would agree): renaissance flutes look deceptively simple...

      All the best, and good work!

      --- In earlyflute@yahoogro ups.com, manuel torres <judy_nolo@. ..> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hello everyone,
      >
      > I am Manuel Torres 53, a flute fancier and new to earlyflute. I used to play recorders in college (soprano, alto and bass) and enjoyed it immensely. I would now like to learn to play the renaissance flute in D and also build my own flute as i am semi-retired and pretty good at construction and fabrication. I have access to quite a variety of well seasoned tropical woods and would like access to decent dimensional plans for a renaissance flute and try my hand at flute-making. If there is anyone out there who can help please throw information and advice my way.
      >
      > Thank you very much for your time,
      >
      > Manolo
      >
      > P.S.
      >
      > Is the tenor flute dimensional plan posted on you tube any good ?
      >


    • manuel torres
      Dear Andre, Thank you for setting me off in the right direction. It is much appreciated!  regards, Manolo ... From: andre.alonso@ymail.com
      Message 2 of 8 , May 1, 2009
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Andre,

        Thank you for setting me off in the right direction. It is much appreciated! 

        regards,

        Manolo

        --- On Thu, 30/4/09, andre.alonso@... <andre.alonso@...> wrote:

        From: andre.alonso@... <andre.alonso@...>
        Subject: [earlyflute] Re: Hello Everyone!
        To: earlyflute@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, 30 April, 2009, 10:58 PM

        Hi, Manuel!

        The plan on YouTube you´re referring to is probably one that was posted by Filadelfio Puglisi, an excellent italian maker and a very serious researcher of renaissance flutes - if he posted a plan, it must be very sound stuff, even if in a somewhat simplified form, perhaps. He has also written a book, published by SPES ("The renaissance flutes in italy") with detailed plans for just about every reanissance flute to be found in Italy. And, of course, Phillipe Allain-Dupré is another great expert and performer on renaissance flutes, he has an outstanding website on everything related to these instruments - visit it, by all means! Filadelfio himself (a fantastic fellow by the way) recommended Phillipe´s book and articles to me on the highest terms - so, I guess that with these two specialists you will be in very good company when trying your hand at making renaissance tenors. But, just heed Filadelfio´s comment on his book (I´m sure Phillipe would agree): renaissance flutes look deceptively simple...

        All the best, and good work!

        --- In earlyflute@yahoogro ups.com, manuel torres <judy_nolo@. ..> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hello everyone,
        >
        > I am Manuel Torres 53, a flute fancier and new to earlyflute. I used to play recorders in college (soprano, alto and bass) and enjoyed it immensely. I would now like to learn to play the renaissance flute in D and also build my own flute as i am semi-retired and pretty good at construction and fabrication. I have access to quite a variety of well seasoned tropical woods and would like access to decent dimensional plans for a renaissance flute and try my hand at flute-making. If there is anyone out there who can help please throw information and advice my way.
        >
        > Thank you very much for your time,
        >
        > Manolo
        >
        > P.S.
        >
        > Is the tenor flute dimensional plan posted on you tube any good ?
        >


      • PJ Barina
        This is a bit of a side question to the subject of Renaissance Flutes I ve been thinking about looking into: Are there decent and less than expensive plastic
        Message 3 of 8 , May 1, 2009
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          This is a bit of a side question to the subject of Renaissance Flutes I've been thinking about looking into: Are there decent and less than expensive plastic Renaissance flutes to be recommended to those (such as me) who might want to give them a try by way of experiment? Thanks... Paul
        • rod cameron
          Hello, Manuel, I agree with Philippe. Renaissance flute look simple, elegant, and at first blush, one could imagine them to be a good starting point, and then
          Message 4 of 8 , May 1, 2009
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Hello, Manuel,

            I agree with Philippe. Renaissance flute look simple, elegant, and at first blush, one could imagine them to be a good starting point, and then progress to, say, a one keyed flute, but putting an accurate precision hole down the long length of a thin wood billet is easier said than done, when you are at the beginning stage of acquiring your skills.
            I also would say that playing the renaissance flute is more difficult than the one keyed flute.

            However, your own instincts may nonetheless draw you to the renaissance flute, and that is great!

            May I suggest, get the books and data, then try some experiments with plastic pipe of the closest internal diameter to some of the original flutes, and try making yourself a number of plastic renaissance flutes.  You will learn a lot by this approach about voicing and tuning, and then see if you enjoy playing in that style, in which case you may want to proceed to wood.

            Nancy Hadden, an American living in London, has worked with renaissance flute for decades. Perhaps some flute lessons with Nancy`would further assist.

            Philippe and Filadelfio are two great sources.  Unfortunately, it is more and more difficult to have access to try a few moments of playing on the originals, but in the old days, we had more opportunity.


            best wishes!

            Rod


            On May 1, 2009, at 2:16 AM, manuel torres wrote:




            Thank you Philippe for your kind reply,

            I will take your advice to heart, i know that attaining correct intonation is not so easy and that i will have to run through a number of flutes to get it right. However, the prospect of eventually succeeding is exciting for me and i know that it will bring me immense satisfaction. Thank you once again!

            regards,

            Manolo

            --- On Fri, 1/5/09, Philippe Allain-Dupré <allain-dupre@ club-internet. fr> wrote:

            From: Philippe Allain-Dupré <allain-dupre@ club-internet. fr>
            Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Re: Hello Everyone!
            To: earlyflute@yahoogro ups.com
            Date: Friday, 1 May, 2009, 2:42 AM


            HI André and Manuel
            Yes Renaissance flute making is not so easy than it appears.
            If you think the cylindrical bore will be easier to make than a conical bore, then you have to be sure of your craftmanship :
            The mouthhole and the 6 holes are drilled on the same piece of wood  at least 600mm long. Don't miss one!
            Making the flute in two parts generates many tuning problems, the very thin tenon usually shrinks.
            Good luck
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 4:58 AM
            Subject: [earlyflute] Re: Hello Everyone!

            Hi, Manuel!

            The plan on YouTube you´re referring to is probably one that was posted by Filadelfio Puglisi, an excellent italian maker and a very serious researcher of renaissance flutes - if he posted a plan, it must be very sound stuff, even if in a somewhat simplified form, perhaps. He has also written a book, published by SPES ("The renaissance flutes in italy") with detailed plans for just about every reanissance flute to be found in Italy. And, of course, Phillipe Allain-Dupré is another great expert and performer on renaissance flutes, he has an outstanding website on everything related to these instruments - visit it, by all means! Filadelfio himself (a fantastic fellow by the way) recommended Phillipe´s book and articles to me on the highest terms - so, I guess that with these two specialists you will be in very good company when trying your hand at making renaissance tenors. But, just heed Filadelfio´s comment on his book (I´m sure Phillipe would agree): renaissance flutes look deceptively simple...

            All the best, and good work!

            --- In earlyflute@yahoogro ups.com, manuel torres <judy_nolo@. ..> wrote:
            >
            > 
            > Hello everyone,
            > 
            > I am Manuel Torres 53, a flute fancier and new to earlyflute. I used to play recorders in college (soprano, alto and bass) and enjoyed it immensely. I would now like to learn to play the renaissance flute in D and also build my own flute as i am semi-retired and pretty good at construction and fabrication. I have access to quite a variety of well seasoned tropical woods and would like access to decent dimensional plans for a renaissance flute and try my hand at flute-making. If there is anyone out there who can help please throw information and advice my way. 
            > 
            > Thank you very much for your time,
            > 
            > Manolo
            > 
            > P.S.
            > 
            > Is the tenor flute dimensional plan posted on you tube any good ?
            >




            Roderick Cameron
            PO Box 438
            10580 Williams Street
            Mendocino, 
            CA 95460,  USA
            studio 707 937 0412
            Home 707 937 9921
            cell:    707 813 7593




          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.