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Some boxwood logs going a begging in Scotland?

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  • rod cameron
    I will make this note brief, but I have now moved my Scottish workshop from its Highland home in Nairn. It is now at Hamish Moore s, the bag pipe maker. He and
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 9 1:27 PM
      I will make this note brief, but I have now moved my Scottish workshop from its Highland home in Nairn. It is now at Hamish Moore's, the bag pipe maker. He and his son, Finlay, are very good friends and colleagues, and Fin is a fine maker, reeder and player. The shop is in an even more glorious part of the Scottish Highlands. Fin will use it as his workshop, and I will use it any time I am working from Scotland, so the tools keep sharp year round, and will always be in use. I like the arrangement!

      I drove two truck loads of boxwood down to Hamish's, and had some other logs left. I decided that I had enough boxwood for my remaining years, but still had some logs back at my old shop, and I left these with my friend, Roger, who sells antiques on a lovely farm nearby just a few miles from Nairn which is twenty minutes drive from Inverness. I told him I would put the word out to any boxwood user within reach of the Highlands (with a rental small van) and who might be interested in the left-over logs. There is quite a bit. Don't flood me with emails, but if you are seriously interested, write me an email, and I will send you a picture of the pile of logs that Roger now has. They are available for sale from him, at a reasonable price.

      Roger's email is:


      Dalmore Manse, Lethen Rd, Auldearn, by Nairn, Inverness, UK - Scotland IV12 5HZ · 1667-453-087

      He is a busy man, but keep trying, and ask about the boxwood logs that Rod Cameron supplied.

      Remember that if you buy boxwood in the log, after getting as good a yield as you can for flutes or recorders, etc., you can sell on the small chunks to violin peg makers, and other fine woodworkers are interested in small pieces for fine inlay work in furniture, etc. So every last small piece is sought after by different kinds of craft people, after you get what you can for your individual needs. These logs were cut about 15 years ago. Have Roger give you a sense of cracks, knots and checking, ahead of time, before you set out on a long journey. Roger is a fair dealer, and not a boxwood specialist, yet an excellent woodworker, so it could be put to good use for a reasonable price if anyone reading the posting is within striking distance?

      best wishes!

      Rod


      Roderick Cameron
      PO Box 438
      10580 Williams Street
      Mendocino, 
      CA 95460,  USA
      Telelphone:  
      studio 707 937 0412
      Home 707 937 9921
      cell:    707 813 7593



    • Céline Fosse
      Hello, I am a student working on a Master s thesis in musicology at the University of Lyon. My thesis concerns the manufacture of the Baroque flute during
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 11 6:02 AM
        Hello,

        I am a student working on a Master’s thesis in musicology at the University of Lyon.  My thesis concerns the manufacture of the Baroque flute during both the Baroque period itself and today.  In order to better understand the current state of Baroque flute-making, I composed a questionaire for flute-makers in hopes of getting to know more about their work. So if you make baroque transverse flutes, and if you accept to help me, I thank you in advance for your invaluable knowledge. If you already answered this questions, thank you very much for your help !

        Some of the questions in the attached questionnaire may seem indiscreet.  Rest assured that my research is not a question of revealing trade secrets, but of better understanding those working within the revival of the Baroque flute.  Also, please do not feel constrained to answer all of the questions for whatever reason.  I remain at your disposal if you have any further questions, or comments.

        Thank you very much,

        Céline Dulac

        PS : Si vous préférez recevoir le questionnaire en français, il suffit de me le demander !
        ______________
        Céline Dulac

        5 rue Anselme
        69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
        0(033)6 60 97 19 69
        http://www.concerto-angelico.com
        http://www.musiciens-cythere.org


        Questionnaire

        1. In what context did you come to Baroque flute-making?

        2. How did you learn the trade?  (From another flute-maker?  Self-taught?)

        3. How long was it before you were able to make a sellable one-keyed flute intended to be played by musicians?

        4. What sort of musical training have you had?

        5. Do you yourself play the Baroque flute?  If so, in what contexts?  Amateur?  Professional?

        6. Do you teach or have you taught instrument making?

        7. What models of keyed flutes do you manufacture?  From what materials?

        8.  About how many instruments do you make per year?

        9.  Do you prefer to precisely copy historic instruments, or do you prefer to bring a more personal character to your work?

        10.  What techniques do you use for the reproduction of a historical model?

        11.  Have you created any particularly unusual keyed flutes?  (Created from unusual materials, unusual key-systems, non-historical key-systems?)

        12.  Do you sign or number your flutes?

        13.  Are you solely responsable for the creation of your flutes, or do you work in collaboration?  If you do work with other artisans, what duties to you leave to them?

        14.  Aside from Baroque flutes do you create other instruments?

        15.  Do you ever work as a restorer of old instruments?  Do you draft plans from/of old instruments?

        16. What is the most important for you : musicology research or musical "instinct" ?

        17. Do you try to improve the one-keyed flute ?

        Thank you very much !
      • Céline Fosse
        Hello, I would like to know if somebody here heard about original stained flutes (from the 17th or 18th century). Philippe, I think you told me once that the
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 11 11:21 AM
          Hello,

          I would like to know if somebody here heard about original stained flutes (from the 17th or 18th century). Philippe, I think you told me once that the early flute-makers never stained their flutes (perhaps I didn't understand well what you said), but I read somewhere that "The original [Kuijken's GA Rottenburgh flute] is in acid-stained boxwood varnished dark brown, almost black. This was done by many period makers in order to make the common boxwood look like the exotic and thus very expensive ebony." I don't know what to think now !

          Thanks in advance !


          Céline Dulac

          ______________
          Céline Dulac

          5 rue Anselme
          69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
          0(033)6 60 97 19 69
          http://www.concerto-angelico.com
          http://www.musiciens-cythere.org
        • Mary Kirkpatrick
          Dear Celine, I happen to be a maker of early (two-keyed) oboes, and the matter of staining is probably similar to that of flutes. There are some quite early
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 12 9:12 AM
            Dear Celine,

            I happen to be a maker of early (two-keyed)
            oboes, and the matter of staining is probably
            similar to that of flutes. There are some quite
            early oboes which are unstained, and then many
            French, English and Dutch oboes of the baroque
            period which are. It seems that when makers did
            stain the oboes, it was very dark to start with,
            in imitation of ebony. Sometimes it is partly
            worn off, especially around the fingerholes.
            German oboes were less often stained,
            transitional oboes (including the "straight-top"
            ones) could be either way, and then classical
            oboes were typically not stained, although
            occasionally you find some made of exotic dark
            woods such as blackwood or rosewood.

            What may be confusing is that boxwood when given
            a simple oil finish darkens with age. This
            happens from a reaction with the oxygen in the
            air; exposure to sunlight doesn't make it darker
            or lighter. (I know this from tools with boxwood
            handles which I leave on the window sill always
            the same way up; they darken the same on both
            sides.) An oil finish allows the oxygen to
            penetrate. A lacquer or varnish type of finish
            keeps the wood lighter -- in some classical
            instruments the color is still that of new
            boxwood and so it seems reasonable to infer that
            they must be finished with something besides oil.

            The color that boxwood acquires with age is a
            medium orangey-brown, like the color of some dark
            honey, or like the color white pine gets with
            age. The darkness depends on the length of time
            it has been exposed. So, early 18th century
            unstained oboes can look as if they have been
            stained, and in fact the color can be reproduced
            (if you don't want to wait a couple of centuries)
            by a light acid stain without the additional iron
            etc. needed for an "ebony" stain.

            Mary Kirkpatrick

            P.S. I've heard it's good listserve practice to
            get someone's permission before quoting or
            refering to them on it. It is easy for
            statements to get out of context...




            Hello,

            I would like to know if somebody here heard about
            original stained flutes (from the 17th or 18th
            century). Philippe, I think you told me once that
            the early flute-makers never stained their flutes
            (perhaps I didn't understand well what you said),
            but I read somewhere that "The original
            [Kuijken's GA Rottenburgh flute] is in
            acid-stained boxwood varnished dark brown, almost
            black. This was done by many period makers in
            order to make the common boxwood look like the
            exotic and thus very expensive ebony." I don't
            know what to think now !

            Thanks in advance !


            Céline Dulac

            ______________
            Céline Dulac
            5 rue Anselme
            69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
            0(033)6 60 97 19 69
            <http://www.concerto-angelico.com>http://www.concerto-angelico.com
            <http://www.musiciens-cythere.org>http://www.musiciens-cythere.org
          • Steve Mueller
            Putting the best construction on Celine s post, isn t it possible, or even likely, she read the quote once upon a time but no longer remembers where? It s an
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 12 3:11 PM
              Putting the best construction on Celine's post, isn't it possible, or even likely, she read the quote once upon a time but no longer remembers where? It's an interesting question she poses and it seems not unethical to state it as she does given that email lists, net news, and the like use the models of conversation and classroom  discussion rather than publication (at least they have since 1980 when I became involved in one of the Internet's first Newsnet groups, one with extensive participation by professors and students at MIT).

              A conversation fit for academic publication would be an interesting variation on the Victor Borge spoken punctuation routines, but I'd much prefer that people ask about or pose interesting ideas in these venues even if they don't have scholarly apparatus at hand.  Should they every publish (or perish), the author and a good editor can see to it all necessary attributions are in place.

              In the meantime, I'll cast my lot with those who ask questions many of us don't even know enough to ask. A good question can be as instructive as a good answer. So keep those cards and letters coming Celine.

              Steve Mueller
              Austin, TX

              Mary Kirkpatrick <mkirk7@...> wrote:
              Dear Celine,

              <snip/>

              P.S. I've heard it's good listserve practice to
              get someone's permission before quoting or
              refering to them on it. It is easy for
              statements to get out of context...

              <snip/>
              <begin-celine-quote>
              I read somewhere that "The original
              [Kuijken's GA Rottenburgh flute] is in
              acid-stained boxwood varnished dark brown, almost
              black. This was done by many period makers in
              order to make the common boxwood look like the
              exotic and thus very expensive ebony."
              </end-celine-quote>

            • rod cameron
              Dear Céline, Bart s Rottenburgh was varnished at some time in the past, but I don t think it was to give a black colour. I think I remember Bart saying that a
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 12 7:00 PM
                Dear Céline,

                Bart's Rottenburgh was varnished at some time in the past, but I don't think it was to give a black colour. I think I remember Bart saying that a small chip was analyzed.

                There are many examples of light toned boxwood flutes and recorders, and rather dark but rich brown tones on other originals that are obviously acid stained with iron added.

                Mary's posting is interesting... about linseed darkening with the years. It is a bit hard to keep dirt out of the wood surface using linseed only, and many of the light boxwood originals are completely finger-dirt free?

                Celine, you are right about " fake ebony" look for the less expensive domestic boxwood ( now the cost is reversed!). An excellent example I have studied is the twin set of Martin Metzler flute d'amours in the New York Met Museum. I model these flutes, and have good photos. They show boxwood on the tenons and a very dark stain on the exterior, but not quite jet black, however they are assumed to be ebony at first glance.

                Best wishes!

                Rod

                On Aug 11, 2007, at 11:21 AM, Céline Fosse wrote:

                Hello,

                I would like to know if somebody here heard about original stained flutes (from the 17th or 18th century). Philippe, I think you told me once that the early flute-makers never stained their flutes (perhaps I didn't understand well what you said), but I read somewhere that "The original [Kuijken's GA Rottenburgh flute] is in acid-stained boxwood varnished dark brown, almost black. This was done by many period makers in order to make the common boxwood look like the exotic and thus very expensive ebony." I don't know what to think now !


                Thanks in advance !


                Céline Dulac

                ______________
                Céline Dulac

                5 rue Anselme
                69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
                0(033)6 60 97 19 69
                http://www.concerto-angelico.com
                http://www.musiciens-cythere.org


              • Mary Kirkpatrick
                Steve, Actually I meant the reference to Philippe. But thank you, for your enthusiastic rebuttal of what was in any case uncalled-for criticism! Mary Putting
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 12 8:10 PM
                  Steve,

                  Actually I meant the reference to Philippe. But thank you, for your
                  enthusiastic rebuttal of what was in any case uncalled-for criticism!

                  Mary


                  Putting the best construction on Celine's post, isn't it possible, or
                  even likely, she read the quote once upon a time but no longer
                  remembers where? It's an interesting question she poses and it seems
                  not unethical to state it as she does given that email lists, net
                  news, and the like use the models of conversation and classroom
                  discussion rather than publication (at least they have since 1980
                  when I became involved in one of the Internet's first Newsnet groups,
                  one with extensive participation by professors and students at MIT).

                  A conversation fit for academic publication would be an interesting
                  variation on the Victor Borge spoken punctuation routines, but I'd
                  much prefer that people ask about or pose interesting ideas in these
                  venues even if they don't have scholarly apparatus at hand. Should
                  they every publish (or perish), the author and a good editor can see
                  to it all necessary attributions are in place.

                  In the meantime, I'll cast my lot with those who ask questions many
                  of us don't even know enough to ask. A good question can be as
                  instructive as a good answer. So keep those cards and letters coming
                  Celine.

                  Steve Mueller
                  Austin, TX

                  Mary Kirkpatrick <mkirk7@...> wrote:

                  Dear Celine,

                  <snip/>

                  P.S. I've heard it's good listserve practice to
                  get someone's permission before quoting or
                  refering to them on it. It is easy for
                  statements to get out of context...

                  <snip/>

                  <begin-celine-quote>
                  I read somewhere that "The original
                  [Kuijken's GA Rottenburgh flute] is in
                  acid-stained boxwood varnished dark brown, almost
                  black. This was done by many period makers in
                  order to make the common boxwood look like the
                  exotic and thus very expensive ebony."

                  </end-celine-quote>
                • Mary Kirkpatrick
                  Hi Rod, I m theorizing that it s not the linseed that darkens; it s the oxygen getting through it that reacts with something in the wood to darken it. If you
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 12 8:26 PM
                    Hi Rod,

                    I'm theorizing that it's not the linseed that
                    darkens; it's the oxygen getting through it that
                    reacts with something in the wood to darken it.
                    If you procrastinate as long as I do about
                    getting some pieces from the rough-hewn or
                    rough-turned state, you can observe after several
                    years a lot of color change with the wood sitting
                    all nice and clean in a box (no oil, no dirt) --
                    a chip taken off the piece shows the original
                    lighter color.

                    Mary


                    Dear Céline,

                    Bart's Rottenburgh was varnished at some time in
                    the past, but I don't think it was to give a
                    black colour. I think I remember Bart saying that
                    a small chip was analyzed.

                    There are many examples of light toned boxwood
                    flutes and recorders, and rather dark but rich
                    brown tones on other originals that are obviously
                    acid stained with iron added.

                    Mary's posting is interesting... about linseed
                    darkening with the years. It is a bit hard to
                    keep dirt out of the wood surface using linseed
                    only, and many of the light boxwood originals are
                    completely finger-dirt free?

                    Celine, you are right about " fake ebony" look
                    for the less expensive domestic boxwood ( now the
                    cost is reversed!). An excellent example I have
                    studied is the twin set of Martin Metzler flute
                    d'amours in the New York Met Museum. I model
                    these flutes, and have good photos. They show
                    boxwood on the tenons and a very dark stain on
                    the exterior, but not quite jet black, however
                    they are assumed to be ebony at first glance.

                    Best wishes!

                    Rod

                    On Aug 11, 2007, at 11:21 AM, Céline Fosse wrote:

                    Hello,

                    I would like to know if somebody here heard about
                    original stained flutes (from the 17th or 18th
                    century). Philippe, I think you told me once that
                    the early flute-makers never stained their flutes
                    (perhaps I didn't understand well what you said),
                    but I read somewhere that "The original
                    [Kuijken's GA Rottenburgh flute] is in
                    acid-stained boxwood varnished dark brown, almost
                    black. This was done by many period makers in
                    order to make the common boxwood look like the
                    exotic and thus very expensive ebony." I don't
                    know what to think now !


                    Thanks in advance !


                    Céline Dulac

                    ______________
                    Céline Dulac
                    5 rue Anselme
                    69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
                    0(033)6 60 97 19 69
                    <http://www.concerto-angelico.com>http://www.concerto-angelico.com
                    <http://www.musiciens-cythere.org>http://www.musiciens-cythere.org
                  • rod cameron
                    Good observation, Mary! It has been so long since we met up! Do you every get to the west coast? It would be fun to take some time to shop talk, over a cup of
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 12 9:13 PM
                      Good observation, Mary!

                      It has been so long since we met up!

                      Do you every get to the west coast?  It would be fun to take some time to shop talk, over a cup of tea.

                      We always have a place for you to lay your head for a few days...

                      best

                      Rod

                      On Aug 12, 2007, at 8:26 PM, Mary Kirkpatrick wrote:

                      Hi Rod,

                      I'm theorizing that it's not the linseed that
                      darkens; it's the oxygen getting through it that
                      reacts with something in the wood to darken it.
                      If you procrastinate as long as I do about
                      getting some pieces from the rough-hewn or
                      rough-turned state, you can observe after several
                      years a lot of color change with the wood sitting
                      all nice and clean in a box (no oil, no dirt) --
                      a chip taken off the piece shows the original
                      lighter color.

                      Mary

                      Dear Céline,

                      Bart's Rottenburgh was varnished at some time in
                      the past, but I don't think it was to give a
                      black colour. I think I remember Bart saying that
                      a small chip was analyzed.

                      There are many examples of light toned boxwood
                      flutes and recorders, and rather dark but rich
                      brown tones on other originals that are obviously
                      acid stained with iron added.

                      Mary's posting is interesting... about linseed
                      darkening with the years. It is a bit hard to
                      keep dirt out of the wood surface using linseed
                      only, and many of the light boxwood originals are
                      completely finger-dirt free?

                      Celine, you are right about " fake ebony" look
                      for the less expensive domestic boxwood ( now the
                      cost is reversed!). An excellent example I have
                      studied is the twin set of Martin Metzler flute
                      d'amours in the New York Met Museum. I model
                      these flutes, and have good photos. They show
                      boxwood on the tenons and a very dark stain on
                      the exterior, but not quite jet black, however
                      they are assumed to be ebony at first glance.

                      Best wishes!

                      Rod

                      On Aug 11, 2007, at 11:21 AM, Céline Fosse wrote:

                      Hello,

                      I would like to know if somebody here heard about
                      original stained flutes (from the 17th or 18th
                      century). Philippe, I think you told me once that
                      the early flute-makers never stained their flutes
                      (perhaps I didn't understand well what you said),
                      but I read somewhere that "The original
                      [Kuijken's GA Rottenburgh flute] is in
                      acid-stained boxwood varnished dark brown, almost
                      black. This was done by many period makers in
                      order to make the common boxwood look like the
                      exotic and thus very expensive ebony." I don't
                      know what to think now !

                      Thanks in advance !

                      Céline Dulac

                      ______________
                      Céline Dulac
                      5 rue Anselme
                      69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
                      0(033)6 60 97 19 69
                      <http://www.concerto-angelico.com>http://www.concerto-angelico.com
                      <http://www.musiciens-cythere.org>http://www.musiciens-cythere.org


                    • Céline Fosse
                      Hello, I m still translating your messages to understand everything, but I m very slow in that task... I m just a poor and stupid french student ;-) But if I
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 12 11:56 PM
                        Hello,
                        I'm still translating your messages to understand everything, but I'm very slow in that task... I'm just a poor and stupid french student ;-) But if I understand well, you would like me to replace the quotes in their context, isn't it ? I didn't want to do it before because I wasn't sure the authors would agree. But now I know it wasn't such a good idea...
                        When Philippe made me a flute six years ago (hello Philippe), I asked him why all of his flutes were unstained. He answered that the early flute-makers never stained their flutes, that's why he doesn't make it. The early flutes are dark because of the age (he didn't specify if it's because of oxygen or something else)
                        The second quote : "The original [Kuijken's GA Rottenburgh flute] is in acid-stained boxwood varnished dark brown, almost black. This was done by many period makers in  order to make the common boxwood look like the exotic and thus very expensive ebony" comes from this page : http://www.historicalwoodwinds.be/content/hw.asp?menu=i&instr=GAROTTENBU
                        Thank you for your answers, it helps me a lot in my research !
                        Céline

                        ______________
                        Céline Dulac

                        5 rue Anselme
                        69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
                        0(033)6 60 97 19 69
                        http://www.concerto-angelico.com
                        http://www.musiciens-cythere.org
                      • Céline Fosse
                        Hello, Thank you very much to Mary Kirkpatrick, Steve Mueller, Barbara Kallaur and Rod Cameron ! If somebody else can help me, he s very welcome ! Actually, I
                        Message 11 of 12 , Aug 13 12:22 PM
                          Hello,

                          Thank you very much to Mary Kirkpatrick, Steve Mueller, Barbara Kallaur and Rod Cameron ! If somebody else can help me, he's very welcome !

                          Actually, I found 2 stained flutes in the collection of the Cité de la Musique Museum (Paris) :
                          - Flûte traversière, Naust (Pierre), Paris, vers 1700, E.710 Flûte traversière / E.710 / Naust, Pierre / PARIS / FRANCE / EUROPE / vers 1700 0252562 Description : 3 corps en buis teinté [stained boxwood] * 3 viroles et cabochon en ivoire * 7 trous * 1 clef en cuivre à décor gravé * Marque au fer sur les 4 corps : ″NAUST″ surmontant 1 lion rampant * Diapason moyen : 367 * (Source : Musée-promenade de Marly-le-roi : Divertissements à Marly au temps de Louis XIV. F. Gétreau : Inventaire descriptif des flûtes traversières) ; Longueur totale : 772 mm
                          - Flûte traversière, Anonyme, Allemagne, vers 1750, E.0614, Flûte traversière / E.0614 / Anonyme / ALLEMAGNE / EUROPE / vers 1750 0254319 Description : 4 corps en buis teinté * 4 viroles et cabochon en ivoire * 2 clefs en cuivre * Embouchure ovalisée * Marque sur les 4 corps : ″C F″ surmontant un ″Y″ renversé * Diapason moyen : 397 * (Source : F. Gétreau : Inventaire descriptif des flûtes traversières) ; Longueur totale : 683 mm

                          Do you think they stained their flutes with nitric acid too ?

                          I read on Martin Wenner's website ( http://www.wennerfloeten.de/english/frame_eintrav_renaissance_e.htm then go to "G. A. Rottenburgh" in the left side of the screen) that the Kuijken's flute is stained and treated with violin varnish :
                          "The original flute is made of boxwood which has been stained and treated with violin varnish [...] The surface is refined with a violin varnish, which constitutes an important component of the sonority"
                          What do you think about ? A violin varnish can really improve (or even modify) the sonority ? For a violin, I understand, but for a woodwind instrument, it's strange, especially if the varnish is on the surface of the flute.

                          Thanks in advance,

                          Céline

                          ______________
                          Céline Dulac

                          5 rue Anselme
                          69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
                          0(033)6 60 97 19 69
                          http://www.concerto-angelico.com
                          http://www.musiciens-cythere.org
                        • Mary Kirkpatrick
                          Hello again Céline, As to your question Do you think they stained their flutes with nitric acid too ? -- yes, I think so, because there are some dark
                          Message 12 of 12 , Aug 13 9:09 PM
                            Hello again Céline,

                            As to your question "Do you think they stained
                            their flutes with nitric acid too ?" -- yes, I
                            think so, because there are some dark patches; it
                            looks like the stain has mostly worn off. I
                            don't know about the use of varnish.

                            The Naust has a lovely key! And (incidentally)
                            the key of the anonymous flute is unusual,
                            curving to the side. I can't think of any
                            functional reason -- perhaps the idea was to keep
                            the hole in line with the others? Early baroque
                            oboes were made with two Eb keys so that one
                            could play with either hand down, and so the
                            touch of the C key had a symetrical two-headed
                            shape, which persisted long after there was only
                            one Eb key. I have seen only one oboe with a C
                            key in a shape like that on this flute, and it
                            was by Johann Friedrich Engelhard, who was noted
                            as an excellent flutemaker.

                            Mary




                            Hello,

                            Thank you very much to Mary Kirkpatrick, Steve
                            Mueller, Barbara Kallaur and Rod Cameron ! If
                            somebody else can help me, he's very welcome !

                            Actually, I found 2 stained flutes in the
                            collection of the Cité de la Musique Museum
                            (Paris) :
                            - Flûte traversière, Naust (Pierre), Paris, vers
                            1700, E.710
                            <http://mediatheque.cite-musique.fr/ClientBookLineCIMU/recherche/NoticeDetailleByID.asp?ID=0162004>Flûte
                            traversière / E.710 / Naust, Pierre / PARIS /
                            FRANCE / EUROPE / vers 1700 0252562 Description :
                            3 corps en buis teinté [stained boxwood] * 3
                            viroles et cabochon en ivoire * 7 trous * 1 clef
                            en cuivre à décor gravé * Marque au fer sur les 4
                            corps : ÅçNAUSTÅç surmontant 1 lion rampant *
                            Diapason moyen : 367 * (Source : Musée-promenade
                            de Marly-le-roi : Divertissements à Marly au
                            temps de Louis XIV. F. Gétreau : Inventaire
                            descriptif des flûtes traversières) ; Longueur
                            totale : 772 mm
                            - Flûte traversière, Anonyme, Allemagne, vers
                            1750, E.0614,
                            <http://mediatheque.cite-musique.fr/ClientBookLineCIMU/recherche/NoticeDetailleByID.asp?ID=0157733>Flûte
                            traversière / E.0614 / Anonyme / ALLEMAGNE /
                            EUROPE / vers 1750 0254319 Description : 4 corps
                            en buis teinté * 4 viroles et cabochon en ivoire
                            * 2 clefs en cuivre * Embouchure ovalisée *
                            Marque sur les 4 corps : ÅçC FÅç surmontant un
                            ÅçYÅç renversé * Diapason moyen : 397 * (Source :
                            F. Gétreau : Inventaire descriptif des flûtes
                            traversières) ; Longueur totale : 683 mm

                            Do you think they stained their flutes with nitric acid too ?

                            I read on Martin Wenner's website (
                            <http://www.wennerfloeten.de/english/frame_eintrav_renaissance_e.htm>http://www.wennerfloeten.de/english/frame_eintrav_renaissance_e.htm
                            then go to "G. A. Rottenburgh" in the left side
                            of the screen) that the Kuijken's flute is
                            stained and treated with violin varnish :
                            "The original flute is made of boxwood which has
                            been stained and treated with violin varnish
                            [...] The surface is refined with a violin
                            varnish, which constitutes an important component
                            of the sonority"
                            What do you think about ? A violin varnish can
                            really improve (or even modify) the sonority ?
                            For a violin, I understand, but for a woodwind
                            instrument, it's strange, especially if the
                            varnish is on the surface of the flute.

                            Thanks in advance,

                            Céline

                            ______________
                            Céline Dulac
                            5 rue Anselme
                            69317 Lyon cedex 04 FRANCE
                            0(033)6 60 97 19 69
                            <http://www.concerto-angelico.com>http://www.concerto-angelico.com
                            <http://www.musiciens-cythere.org>http://www.musiciens-cythere.org
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