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Boston Festival

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  • Jean-Francois Beaudin
    Hello Everyone This is to annonce that I will be showing my flutes at the Boston Early music Festival on 13th to 16th of June. I will be at table, #22. I will
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 1, 2007
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      Hello Everyone

      This is to annonce that I will be showing my flutes at the Boston Early music Festival on 13th to 16th of June. I will be at table, #22.
      I will have mainly my modern-traverso at the three pitch versions, 440, 415 and 392Hz. For the 415Hz one, I have two different moulding styles, modern and early french based on the Bressan of the Miller collection. For my 392Hz version, a foot with the two keys of Quantz style will be also possible to see and experimented yourself.
      I think last time I went to this festival was 1981 !
      I am taking also a good series of my flute drawings copies.
      I just come back for a three weeks trip in Paris and had the opportunity to add one more by Bizey.
      See you in Boston
      Jean-François Beaudin
       



       




      Jean-François Beaudin
      312 Chemin Richford
      Frelighsburg, Quebec,
      Canada. J0J 1C0  
      Tel : (450) 298-5161
      Fax : (450) 298-5161
      jfbeaudin@...
      www.flute-beaudin.com


      Avec Windows Live Hotmail, vous disposez du contrôle requis pour vous aider à assurer la confidentialité et la sécurité de votre courriel. Découvrez le nouveau Hotmail!
    • rod cameron
      Jean-François, We were both there in 1981! I am off to Paris. Have a very good exhibition, and lots of success! Rod Roderick Cameron PO Box 438 10580 Wiliam
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 1, 2007
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        Jean-François,

        We were both there in 1981!

        I am off to Paris.

        Have a very good exhibition, and lots of success!

        Rod

        Roderick Cameron
        PO Box 438
        10580 Wiliam street
        Mendocino,  CA 95460,  USA
        Studio: 707 937 0412
        Mobile: 707 813 7593
        Home:  707 937 9921



        On Jun 1, 2007, at 6:57 PM, Jean-Francois Beaudin wrote:


        Hello Everyone

        This is to annonce that I will be showing my flutes at the Boston Early music Festival on 13th to 16th of June. I will be at table, #22.
        I will have mainly my modern-traverso at the three pitch versions, 440, 415 and 392Hz. For the 415Hz one, I have two different moulding styles, modern and early french based on the Bressan of the Miller collection. For my 392Hz version, a foot with the two keys of Quantz style will be also possible to see and experimented yourself.
        I think last time I went to this festival was 1981 !
        I am taking also a good series of my flute drawings copies.
        I just come back for a three weeks trip in Paris and had the opportunity to add one more by Bizey.
        See you in Boston
        Jean-François Beaudin
         



         




        Jean-François Beaudin
        312 Chemin Richford
        Frelighsburg, Quebec,
        Canada. J0J 1C0  
        Tel : (450) 298-5161
        Fax : (450) 298-5161
        jfbeaudin@hotmail.com
        www.flute-beaudin.com


        Avec Windows Live Hotmail, vous disposez du contrôle requis pour vous aider à assurer la confidentialité et la sécurité de votre courriel. Découvrez le nouveau Hotmail!


      • Philippe Allain-Dupré
        Dear Jean-François Your trip in Paris was great. I wish you as much success at Boston exhibition as Theobald Boehm got in the past in such exhibitions.
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 2, 2007
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          Dear Jean-François
          Your trip in Paris was great.
          I wish you as much success at Boston exhibition as Theobald Boehm got in the past in such exhibitions.
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, June 02, 2007 3:57 AM
          Subject: [earlyflute] Boston Festival

          Hello Everyone

          This is to annonce that I will be showing my flutes at the Boston Early music Festival on 13th to 16th of June. I will be at table, #22.
          I will have mainly my modern-traverso at the three pitch versions, 440, 415 and 392Hz. For the 415Hz one, I have two different moulding styles, modern and early french based on the Bressan of the Miller collection. For my 392Hz version, a foot with the two keys of Quantz style will be also possible to see and experimented yourself.
          I think last time I went to this festival was 1981 !
          I am taking also a good series of my flute drawings copies.
          I just come back for a three weeks trip in Paris and had the opportunity to add one more by Bizey.
          See you in Boston
          Jean-François Beaudin
           



           




          Jean-François Beaudin
          312 Chemin Richford
          Frelighsburg, Quebec,
          Canada. J0J 1C0  
          Tel : (450) 298-5161
          Fax : (450) 298-5161
          jfbeaudin@hotmail. com
          www.flute-beaudin. com


          Avec Windows Live Hotmail, vous disposez du contrôle requis pour vous aider à assurer la confidentialité et la sécurité de votre courriel. Découvrez le nouveau Hotmail!

        • Roberto Tuninetti
          ... I knew a maker here in Argentina that uses cow legs bones instead ivory for sockets with success. (With the adequate polishing and finishing.) Roberto
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 2, 2007
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            Dear Ardal:

            > Yes, Andreas, unfortunately my experience confirms what Robert
            > and Rod have said. GPS artificial ivory flutes look a lot like real
            > ivory, and even sound somewhat like it. But after a few years an
            > instrument starts to droop and stretch: sockets get bigger and
            > tenons shrink.

            I knew a maker here in Argentina that uses cow legs bones instead
            ivory for sockets with success. (With the adequate polishing and
            finishing.)

            Roberto Tuninetti (Mendoza, ARGENTINA)
            --
          • rod cameron
            Roberto, I agree completely! There is no shortage of cow femur (leg bone), and this is the piece that will work for flute rings. Perhaps in Argentina there is
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 2, 2007
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              Roberto,

              I agree completely!

              There is no shortage of cow femur (leg bone), and this is the piece that will work for flute rings.

              Perhaps in Argentina there is a good business in 'rendering' that will allow you to buy bone that is clean and ready to work.

              I know that in my homeland, Scotland, bone was used for many artifacts, and I would prefer to use it on flutes rather than imitation ivory, if it is available for sale legally. Bone artifacts are easily identified, as the long and large grain structure allows dirt to penetrate quickly and give the characteristic dark axial lines.

              However, a bone ring will remain completely natural looking and free from these lines, using the following approach:

              Prepare the bone, and machine the ring on the lathe, but while it is still a little larger in its size, and before sanding or finish turning, apply some thin super-glue which should immediately fill up the open fissures of the bone structure with capillary action assisting this. Now finish turn, and sand the ring. The result will be like ivory, lacking only the ivory cross-grain pattern.

              Buena suerte!

              Rod

              Roderick Cameron
              PO Box 438
              10580 Williams Street
              Mendocino, 
              CA 95460,  USA
              Telelphone:  
              studio 707 937 0412
              Home 707 937 9921
              cell:    707 813 7593



              On Jun 2, 2007, at 4:56 PM, Roberto Tuninetti wrote:

              Dear Ardal:

              > Yes, Andreas, unfortunately my experience confirms what Robert
              > and Rod have said. GPS artificial ivory flutes look a lot like real
              > ivory, and even sound somewhat like it. But after a few years an
              > instrument starts to droop and stretch: sockets get bigger and
              > tenons shrink.

              I knew a maker here in Argentina that uses cow legs bones instead
              ivory for sockets with success. (With the adequate polishing and
              finishing.)

              Roberto Tuninetti (Mendoza, ARGENTINA)
              --


            • Mary Kirkpatrick
              When I was apprentice to Dr Horace Fitzpatrick, he managed to make one flute with oxbone mounts, though as I remember it was difficult to find pieces round
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 3, 2007
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                When I was apprentice to Dr Horace Fitzpatrick, he managed to make
                one flute with oxbone mounts, though as I remember it was difficult
                to find pieces round enough.

                Another great ivory substitute is Corian -- perhaps available only in
                the States (?) -- a material made by Dupont for countertops. It
                comes in 3/4" or 1/2" sheets, very expensive in a whole sheet, but
                one can get offcuts from people who install it in kitchens. Corian
                has the weight and turning properties of ivory, unlike the so-called
                ivory substitutes. It comes in various colors; "bone" and "almond"
                are close to the color of new ivory, with "almond" being a bit more
                yellow. A whole flute out of it might be possible by gluing two
                layers of 3/4" Corian together. A professional installer has access
                to the special glue which can join them invisibly. I found recently
                that with ordinary epoxy glue the join is barely perceptible; I glued
                two 3/4" chunks together to make a mount for the top joint of an oboe
                that comes right down to the beginning of the "onion" (to good visual
                effect) and it withstood all the drilling and turning. To make the
                Corian look less artificial, I let the nitric acid get on it while
                staining, and I'm careful polishing, to leave a hint of a brown
                patina.

                Mary Kirkpatrick


                Roberto,

                I agree completely!

                There is no shortage of cow femur (leg bone), and this is the piece
                that will work for flute rings.

                Perhaps in Argentina there is a good business in 'rendering' that
                will allow you to buy bone that is clean and ready to work.

                I know that in my homeland, Scotland, bone was used for many
                artifacts, and I would prefer to use it on flutes rather
                than imitation ivory, if it is available for sale legally. Bone
                artifacts are easily identified, as the long and large grain
                structure allows dirt to penetrate quickly and give
                the characteristic dark axial lines.

                However, a bone ring will remain completely natural looking and free
                from these lines, using the following approach:

                Prepare the bone, and machine the ring on the lathe, but while it is
                still a little larger in its size, and before sanding or finish
                turning, apply some thin super-glue which should immediately fill up
                the open fissures of the bone structure with capillary
                action assisting this. Now finish turn, and sand the ring. The result
                will be like ivory, lacking only the ivory cross-grain pattern.

                Buena suerte!

                Rod

                Roderick Cameron
                PO Box 438
                10580 Williams Street
                Mendocino,
                CA 95460, USA
                Telelphone:
                studio 707 937 0412
                Home 707 937 9921
                cell: 707 813 7593



                On Jun 2, 2007, at 4:56 PM, Roberto Tuninetti wrote:

                Dear Ardal:

                > Yes, Andreas, unfortunately my experience confirms what Robert
                > and Rod have said. GPS artificial ivory flutes look a lot like real
                > ivory, and even sound somewhat like it. But after a few years an
                > instrument starts to droop and stretch: sockets get bigger and
                > tenons shrink.

                I knew a maker here in Argentina that uses cow legs bones instead
                ivory for sockets with success. (With the adequate polishing and
                finishing.)

                Roberto Tuninetti (Mendoza, ARGENTINA)
                --
              • Jean-Francois Beaudin
                Hello everyone I am searching for Mark Leone who lived in 2005, in New-York city area. If anyone have a positive answer, contact me on my hotmail email
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 7, 2007
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                  Hello everyone

                  I am searching for Mark Leone who lived in 2005, in New-York city area.
                  If anyone have a positive answer, contact me on my hotmail email address.

                  Thank you

                  Jean-François




                  Jean-François Beaudin
                  312 Chemin Richford
                  Frelighsburg, Quebec,
                  Canada. J0J 1C0  
                  Tel : (450) 298-5161
                  Fax : (450) 298-5161
                  jfbeaudin@...
                  www.flute-beaudin.com


                  Avec Windows Live Hotmail, vous disposez du contrôle requis pour vous aider à assurer la confidentialité et la sécurité de votre courriel. Découvrez le nouveau Hotmail!
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