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Renaissance flute for beginner

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  • catrijn
    I m a flutist just starting to move into early music (particularly Renaissance), and I m trying to find a decent instrument that would be appropriate for a
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 5, 2005
      I'm a flutist just starting to move into early music (particularly
      Renaissance), and I'm trying to find a decent instrument that would be
      appropriate for a beginner. I don't want to invest too much up front
      without knowing whether this will be a long-term interest, but at the
      same time I don't want to hamstring myself with a poor instrument.
      Plus, even if I decide to continue and get a nicer one eventually,
      I'll still want an extra I don't mind taking outside or on trips. Is
      anyone here familiar with the work of Charles Wells - would this be a
      decent choice? Are there any recommended alternatives?

      Thanks,
      Catrijn
    • Philippe Allain-Dupré
      Good luck You might be intersted by : Internationale Renaissance Traversflöten Tage Stuttgart 8./9. Oktober 2005 http://www.irs2005.de/ Philippe Allain-Dupré
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 5, 2005

        Good luck

        You might be intersted by :

        Internationale

        Renaissance Traversflöten Tage

        Stuttgart 8./9. Oktober 2005

        http://www.irs2005.de/
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: catrijn
        Sent: Friday, August 05, 2005 4:36 PM
        Subject: [earlyflute] Renaissance flute for beginner

        I'm a flutist just starting to move into early music (particularly
        Renaissance), and I'm trying to find a decent instrument that would be
        appropriate for a beginner.  I don't want to invest too much up front
        without knowing whether this will be a long-term interest, but at the
        same time I don't want to hamstring myself with a poor instrument.
        Plus, even if I decide to continue and get a nicer one eventually,
        I'll still want an extra I don't mind taking outside or on trips.  Is
        anyone here familiar with the work of Charles Wells - would this be a
        decent choice?  Are there any recommended alternatives?

        Thanks,
        Catrijn


      • Laura Thompson
        Catrijn, the renaissance flute is a difficult place to start, unless you really like meantone temperament... but since you re determined! try one of the early
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 7, 2005
          Catrijn,
          the renaissance flute is a difficult place to start, unless you really
          like meantone temperament... but since you're determined! try one of
          the early music festivals where instrument makers show their flutes,
          there are a few main types that are copied, one's german, another is
          italian, the italian may be better to start with, as it plays a little
          easier in the high register. Renaissance flutes usually comes in
          groups of three , two small one large, plus one really large...you'll
          just need the middle sized one to start, a tenor flute pitched in D.
          Of course this doesn't answer your question of who makes a good flute,
          just try a few and see which ones you get the nicest sound on, that's
          the best way.
          best of luck, Laura





          --- In earlyflute@yahoogroups.com, "catrijn" <catrijn@g...> wrote:
          > I'm a flutist just starting to move into early music (particularly
          > Renaissance), and I'm trying to find a decent instrument that would
          be
          > appropriate for a beginner. I don't want to invest too much up front
          > without knowing whether this will be a long-term interest, but at the
          > same time I don't want to hamstring myself with a poor instrument.
          > Plus, even if I decide to continue and get a nicer one eventually,
          > I'll still want an extra I don't mind taking outside or on trips. Is
          > anyone here familiar with the work of Charles Wells - would this be a
          > decent choice? Are there any recommended alternatives?
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Catrijn
        • Catrijn vanden Westhende
          Thanks for everyone s input. I guess I will try to find an early music festival in the US that I can manage to travel to and hopefully test out a few models
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 7, 2005
            Thanks for everyone's input. I guess I will try to find an early
            music festival in the US that I can manage to travel to and hopefully
            test out a few models at. Given the cost of the nicer instruments,
            I'll have to be waiting a little longer than I hoped anyway.

            Catrijn
          • querflote
            Dear Catrijn, I started as a flutist on the renaissance instrument (while I was a grad student at Stanford, which boasted Herb Myers as coach of the ren wind
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 7, 2005
              Dear Catrijn,

              I started as a flutist on the renaissance instrument (while I was a grad student at Stanford,
              which boasted Herb Myers as coach of the ren wind band). I came to it from the recorder,
              and was happy to find that i seemed to have no problem with the embouchure for the Ren
              flute. So I decided to try my hand at the Baroque flute, and borrowed one, then was able to
              buy a flute from Rod Cameron.....

              for my money a flute embouchure is a flute embouchure...the top notes on the modern
              instrument just need a little more precision. You should have no problem taking
              technique from the ren flute to the baroque instrument and vice versa. Did you have in
              mind a particular repertoire for your renaissance flute? I think the 16th century stuff is by
              and large more effective on consorts of like instruments, so you will need another three
              flutists to play with....

              it might be more cost effective if you are not sure whether flute is for you to start with an
              Aulos plastic flute redone by Rod. Then you will have a nice instrument that plays well that
              you can carry around and play outside without guilt.

              my two cents....

              Tom Moore
              Rio de Janeiro


              --- In earlyflute@yahoogroups.com, Catrijn vanden Westhende <catrijn@g...> wrote:
              > Thanks for everyone's input. I guess I will try to find an early
              > music festival in the US that I can manage to travel to and hopefully
              > test out a few models at. Given the cost of the nicer instruments,
              > I'll have to be waiting a little longer than I hoped anyway.
              >
              > Catrijn
            • Philippe Allain-Dupré
              ... From: Laura Thompson To: earlyflute@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 10:42 PM Subject: [earlyflute] Re: Renaissance flute for beginner
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 8, 2005
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2005 10:42 PM
                Subject: [earlyflute] Re: Renaissance flute for beginner

                Catrijn,
                the renaissance flute is a difficult place to start, unless you really
                like meantone temperament...
                 
                Hi Laura
                Meantone temperament was used in 17th century to tune keyboards with at least one split-key gsharp-aflat, and sometimes a second one, dsharp-eflat.
                It has nothing to do with Renaissance flutes.
                The only ressemblance is that some major thirds on the Renaissance flute are very small, even smaller than pure, as g-b, a-csharp and d-fsharp.
                As a Renaissance flute maker, I wouldn't dare to tune my consort in meantone where fifths are smaller than pure by 5.5cents (1/4 syntonic comma)
                This means that the fundamental of the bass in G would be 5.5 cents sharper than the fundamental of the tenor in d, itself again 5.5 cents sharper than the discant in a.
                This would make the descant 3Hz lower in pitch than the bass of the consort. Very unpleasant!

                At the contrary this fifths should be tuned pure to have a consort well balanced.
                 
                This written I agree with you that Renaissance flute tuning is somewhat complex for those used to equal temperament.
                Sincerely
                Philippe Allain-Dupré
              • Benedek Csalog
                Dear Philippe, Something else: The hotel you have choosen seems to be a good choice, especialy because of very good location, it is really very central, some
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 21, 2005


                  Dear Philippe,

                  Something else:  The hotel you have choosen seems to be a good choice, especialy because of very good location, it is really very central, some hundred meters from Danube too.

                  Have a good trip,

                  Benedek



                  Benedek Csalog
                  benedek_csalog@...
                  H-1055 Budapest
                  Falk Miksa u. 7
                  Hungary
                  +36-1-3117516
                  +36-20-3976632
                  +49-162-2682726


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