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Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

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  • Philippe Allain-Dupré
    Rod , Rod and Rod (Cameron) (free advertisement) But incidentaly, I guess that the best flute player of Beethoven Symphonies in Frans Brüggen Orchestra
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 1, 2004
      Rod , Rod and Rod (Cameron)
      (free advertisement)
      But incidentaly, I guess that the best flute player of Beethoven Symphonies in Frans  Brüggen  Orchestra  that you didn't mentionned was playing a Rudi Tutz flute. (Free advertisement)
      As I have both and I love them both, I am the right person to answer!
      Warning : never by a belgium De Winne instrument
      They all are for sale second hand after a while.
      Good luck
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 8:12 AM
      Subject: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

      1.What is the best flute for playing Beethoven? Does the most
      historically accurate flute adaquetly meet the challenges of the
      music, or is it best to use a flute from slightly after Beethoven's
      death?

      2. Does anyone know what flutes are being used in either the
      Hogwood, Norrington, or Gardiner recordings of the Beethoven
      Symphonies?

      3. Which current flute maker makes the best Beethoven-appropriate
      instrument, and how do they compare in price?

      -David

      http://mrdavidlross.com



    • Boaz Berney
      Hi David, (free advertisement ;-) ) ... I think most people nowadays use Grenser 6-8 keys copies for Beethoven symphonies. The problem is, that the high
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 1, 2004
        Hi David,
        (free advertisement ;-) )
         
        > 2. Does anyone know what flutes are being used in either the
        > Hogwood, Norrington, or Gardiner recordings of the
        Beethoven
        > Symphonies?
         
        I think most people nowadays use Grenser 6-8 keys copies for Beethoven symphonies.  The problem is, that the high register on these instruments is not as easy as it is on later instruments, and especially when playing the later Symphonies 7th, 8th and for sure the 9th you'd want a flute which is very reliable and perfectly in tune up there.  that was the reason I started looking at  Viennese flutes from Beethoven's time (- and especially at the ones made by Stephan Koch (fl. 1807-1828).  These instruments have a very different concept to the earlier Grenser models, which are basically baroque flutes with keys added.  The flutes made by Koch are very progressive for their time, and try to solve some of the 'probmelms' - or characteristics of the earlier instruments.   The instrument is designed to work with the 'keyed' fingerings - fork fingerings are possible, but only as a last resort.  An other change to the earlier instruments was drilling the 6th finger hole in an angle, to make the e flatter and more stable.  This enables the player to have the Eb key open all the time (yes, even for e) thus solving a problem of the weak e on the earlier flutes, and adding to the volume of sound in the low register. The third octave on these instruments reacts very easily, partly because of the bore design, but also because of the unsual rectangular embouchure shape, which was probably invented by Koch, and was later on adopted by many of the Viennese and Italian makers.  
         
        Good luck!
         
        Boaz

        Boaz Berney - Historical flutes
        http://www.berneyflutes.com
         
        Conradkade 1, 2517BM Den Haag, The Netherlands
        Tel: +31-(0)70-3463045 Fax: +31-(0)8-42211672      

      • Sonja Boon
        Hi Boaz et al: Boaz wrote: I think most people nowadays use Grenser 6-8 keys copies for Beethoven symphonies. The problem is, that the high register on these
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 1, 2004
          Hi Boaz et al:
           
          Boaz wrote:
          "I think most people nowadays use Grenser 6-8 keys copies for Beethoven symphonies.  The problem is, that the high register on these instruments is not as easy as it is on later instruments, and especially when playing the later Symphonies 7th, 8th and for sure the 9th you'd want a flute which is very reliable and perfectly in tune up there."
           
          I use a copy of a Kirst flute (6-8 keyed) by Claire Soubeyran (again, a free advertisement). It has worked beautifully for several Beethoven symphonies (including 7 and 8, which are high, high, high!) - beautiful, sweet, clear and in tune high register that speaks easily and, overall, a warm and very flexible sound that is perfect for the intonational subtleties of orchestral work. It's also a wonderfully expressive instrument for chamber music....Love it lots!
           
           
          Sonja Boon, Vancouver, Canada
           
           
           
           
          Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          ADVERTISEMENT
        • mailfrom.earlyflute.20.glauber@spamgourm
          Are these Beethoven flutes pitched at A=430? g
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 1, 2004
            Are these Beethoven flutes pitched at A=430?

            g
          • Philippe Allain-Dupré
            ... From: Sonja Boon To: earlyflute@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 6:27 PM Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven I use a copy of a
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 1, 2004
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Sonja Boon
              To: earlyflute@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 6:27 PM
              Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

              I use a copy of a Kirst flute (6-8 keyed) by Claire Soubeyran (again, a free
              advertisement). It has worked beautifully for several Beethoven symphonies
              (including 7 and 8, which are high, high, high!) - beautiful, sweet, clear
              and in tune high register that speaks easily and, overall, a warm and very
              flexible sound that is perfect for the intonational subtleties of orchestral
              work. It's also a wonderfully expressive instrument for chamber
              music....Love it lots!


              Sonja Boon, Vancouver, Canada
              http://www.vcn.bc.ca/~sboon/devienne/


              Ok but what about your high f sharp on Claire Kirst?,
              Which fingering do you use?
              Philippe Allain-Dupré
            • Sonja Boon
              ... Like the one-keyed F sharp plus the short F. Sonja Boon
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 1, 2004
                Hi Philippe:
                > Ok but what about your high f sharp on Claire Kirst?,
                > Which fingering do you use?
                > Philippe Allain-Dupré

                Like the one-keyed F sharp plus the short F.

                Sonja Boon
              • Philippe Allain-Dupré
                Hi Sonia I have also noticed that high F sharp is rather flat on this model and you can t play the original fingerings 12- 4--, nor 1-- 4--K Claire makes also
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 1, 2004
                  Hi Sonia
                  I have also noticed that high F sharp is rather flat on this model and you can't play the original fingerings 12- 4--, nor 1-- 4--K
                  Claire makes also wonderful Tulou and Conical Boehm (Free advertisement), but these are not the right flutes for Beethoven Symphonies.
                  Also Kirst (stopped in 1804) or Heinrich Grenser (stopped in 1813) are not the right models to play latest symphonies as Boaz rightly argued. But I wonder whether Koch flutes are powerful enough for orchestra. Weren't they chamber flutes?
                  Sincerely
                  Philippe
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Friday, April 02, 2004 1:28 AM
                  Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

                  Hi Philippe:
                  > Ok but what about your high f sharp on Claire Kirst?,
                  > Which fingering do you use?
                  > Philippe Allain-Dupré

                  Like the one-keyed F sharp plus the short F.

                  Sonja Boon


                • Boaz Berney
                  Dear Phillipe, Hi Sonia I have also noticed that high F sharp is rather flat on this model and you can t play the original fingerings 12- 4--, nor 1-- 4--K
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 1, 2004
                    Dear Phillipe,

                    Hi Sonia
                    I have also noticed that high F sharp is rather flat on this model and you can't play the original fingerings 12- 4--, nor 1-- 4--K
                    Claire makes also wonderful Tulou and Conical Boehm (Free advertisement), but these are not the right flutes for Beethoven Symphonies.
                    Also Kirst (stopped in 1804) or Heinrich Grenser (stopped in 1813) are not the right models to play latest symphonies as Boaz rightly argued. But I wonder whether Koch flutes are powerful enough for orchestra. Weren't they chamber flutes?
                     
                    I don't think they really were - those flutes were meant to work well with a full sound over the whole range - from bottom B to the high B'''.  Koch was a very influential maker - there are several great makers who have started at his workshop (like Ziegler and Liebl)  and many others who have copied his 'Viennese' model.  So i find hard to define the entire Viennese school of making in the first half of the 19th century as making flutes only for chamber music.  In any case, volume is  not a problem on Koch flutes - not with an embouchure size of 9.5X10.5 and a wall thickness of over 5mm at the headjoint...
                     
                    b.t.w. why not play Beethoven on a Tulou, or even better on an earlier French instrument like on an early Godefroy?  Beethoven symphonies where probably performed in Paris more often then they have been in Vienna, and those French instruments have a very good high octave and a good projecting sound, which could work well in an orchestra.
                     
                    Greetings,
                     
                    Boaz
                    Sincerely
                    Philippe
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Friday, April 02, 2004 1:28 AM
                    Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

                    Hi Philippe:
                    > Ok but what about your high f sharp on Claire Kirst?,
                    > Which fingering do you use?
                    > Philippe Allain-Dupré

                    Like the one-keyed F sharp plus the short F.

                    Sonja Boon


                  • Sonja Boon
                    Philippe, Boaz and co: At the risk of being branded a heretic, the best fingering for any flute is the one that is in tune at any given time - and in many
                    Message 9 of 18 , Apr 2, 2004
                      Philippe, Boaz and co:
                       
                      At the risk of being branded a heretic, the best fingering for any flute is the one that is in tune at any given time - and in many cases it's useful to have a large repertoire of them at your fingertips (pardon the pun). When I was still a professional modern flute player, perish the thought ;), I had at least three fingering for every single note in the third register of the instrument. While many of these were commonly known by most professionals, I never ever found them notated in a published source. I can only assume, that with the existence of two different charts by Quantz, for example, that this multitude of fingering approaches and possiblities existed in previous times as well.
                       
                      Not a single flute I have every played is 'perfectly in tune' - indeed it is impossible for a flute to be 'perfectly in tune' at all times and in all situations. Orchestral playing is one of the most glaring example of that. As performers we have three choices - play the so-called 'right' fingering and contort ourselves to get it in tune (if at all), play it out of tune, or find another fingering that works.
                       
                      In my opinion, and it is only mine, the historical record is a tool, not the law.
                       
                      Cheers -
                       
                      Sonja Boon
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 11:23 PM
                      Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

                      Hi Sonia
                      I have also noticed that high F sharp is rather flat on this model and you can't play the original fingerings 12- 4--, nor 1-- 4--K
                      Claire makes also wonderful Tulou and Conical Boehm (Free advertisement), but these are not the right flutes for Beethoven Symphonies.
                      Also Kirst (stopped in 1804) or Heinrich Grenser (stopped in 1813) are not the right models to play latest symphonies as Boaz rightly argued. But I wonder whether Koch flutes are powerful enough for orchestra. Weren't they chamber flutes?
                      Sincerely
                      Philippe
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Friday, April 02, 2004 1:28 AM
                      Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

                      Hi Philippe:
                      > Ok but what about your high f sharp on Claire Kirst?,
                      > Which fingering do you use?
                      > Philippe Allain-Dupré

                      Like the one-keyed F sharp plus the short F.

                      Sonja Boon


                    • mailfrom.earlyflute.20.glauber@spamgourm
                      I m pleasantly surprised about all this activity about playing Beethoven using historically-correct flutes. What s driving this, are these
                      Message 10 of 18 , Apr 2, 2004
                        I'm pleasantly surprised about all this activity about playing
                        Beethoven using historically-correct flutes. What's driving this, are
                        these historically-accurate orchestras, or are you playing your
                        Vienese flute in a "standard" symphony orchestra? Are you playing in
                        A=440 pitch, or A=430, or something else?

                        Just curious,

                        glauber
                      • Sonja Boon
                        Hi Glauber: I play only period instruments in, for lack of better word, historically informed performances....I can t speak for the others, though I ve never
                        Message 11 of 18 , Apr 2, 2004
                          Hi Glauber:

                          I play only period instruments in, for lack of better word, historically
                          informed performances....I can't speak for the others, though I've never
                          seen Boaz ever play anything metal in a modern group as long as I've known
                          him [hi boaz! :) ]

                          so, when i play beethoven, it's on my kirst at A430 with a bunch of
                          like-minded souls as principal flute of the Portland Baroque Orchestra in
                          Oregon, USA or, with earlier music in a chamber setting, with my own
                          ensemble The Burney Ensemble in Vancouver, Canada, or a variety of other
                          groups around the West Coast....

                          It may be worth mentioning that A430 is somewhat erroneous as well...and I'd
                          need to have Bruce Haynes's "The Story of A" at my side at all times to keep
                          all the pitch levels straight....

                          Sonja Boon
                          www.vcn.bc.ca/~sboon/devienne
                        • Rod Cameron
                          Dear Sonja, Thank you for your postings! Perhaps I have missed it but doesn t: 1 - 3 4 5 6 - - - speak high f# on most keyed flutes, as an
                          Message 12 of 18 , Apr 2, 2004
                            Dear Sonja,

                            Thank you for your postings!

                            Perhaps I have missed it but doesn't:

                            1 - 3 4 5 6 - - - speak high f#''' on most keyed flutes, as an
                            alternative.

                            I would agree with you...play what works for the particular instrument.
                            Many years ago I watched Frans Brüggen go through a piece of music and
                            write his alternative fingering down on the page. In the days when he
                            was allowed to borrow and use many originals (as well as his own large
                            collection) he was very much in the habit of finding out what worked
                            for the particular, and sometimes warped orginal.

                            best wishes!

                            Rod

                            On Friday, April 2, 2004, at 09:39 AM, Sonja Boon wrote:

                            > Philippe, Boaz and co:
                            >  
                            > At the risk of being branded a heretic, the best fingering for any
                            > flute is the one that is in tune at any given time - and in many cases
                            > it's useful to have a large repertoire of them at your fingertips
                            > (pardon the pun). When I was still a professional modern flute player,
                            > perish the thought ;), I had at least three fingering for every single
                            > note in the third register of the instrument. While many of these were
                            > commonly known by most professionals, I never ever found them notated
                            > in a published source. I can only assume, that with the existence of
                            > two different charts by Quantz, for example, that this multitude of
                            > fingering approaches and possiblities existed in previous times as
                            > well.
                            >  
                            > Not a single flute I have every played is 'perfectly in tune' - indeed
                            > it is impossible for a flute to be 'perfectly in tune' at all times
                            > and in all situations. Orchestral playing is one of the most glaring
                            > example of that. As performers we have three choices - play the
                            > so-called 'right' fingering and contort ourselves to get it in tune
                            > (if at all), play it out of tune, or find another fingering that > works.
                            >  
                            > In my opinion, and it is only mine, the historical record is a tool,
                            > not the law.
                            >  
                            > Cheers -
                            >  
                            > Sonja Boon
                            > www.vcn.bc.ca/~sboon/devienne
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: Philippe Allain-Dupré
                            > To: earlyflute@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 11:23 PM
                            > Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven
                            >
                            > Hi Sonia
                            > I have also noticed that high F sharp is rather flat on this model and
                            > you can't play the original fingerings 12- 4--, nor 1-- 4--K
                            > Claire makes also wonderful Tulou and Conical Boehm (Free
                            > advertisement), but these are not the right flutes for Beethoven
                            > Symphonies.
                            > Also Kirst (stopped in 1804) or Heinrich Grenser (stopped in 1813) are
                            > not the right models to play latest symphonies as Boaz rightly argued.
                            > But I wonder whether Koch flutes are powerful enough for orchestra.
                            > Weren't they chamber flutes?
                            > Sincerely
                            > Philippe
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: Sonja Boon
                            > To: earlyflute@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Friday, April 02, 2004 1:28 AM
                            > Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven
                            >
                            > Hi Philippe:
                            > > Ok but what about your high f sharp on Claire Kirst?,
                            > > Which fingering do you use?
                            > > Philippe Allain-Dupré
                            >
                            > Like the one-keyed F sharp plus the short F.
                            >
                            > Sonja Boon
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            <image.tiff>
                            >
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                            >
                            Rod Cameron
                            PO 438, 640 School Street,
                            Mendocino, California 95460, USA
                            Tel: 707 937 0412.
                            When in Scotland tel: 44 (0)1667 45 55 84
                          • Philippe Allain-Dupré
                            Sorry Sonia if we didn t understand each other. What I mean is that it s easier to have all flutes with the same system of fingerings. I have all sorts of
                            Message 13 of 18 , Apr 2, 2004
                              Sorry Sonia if we didn't understand each other.
                              What I mean is that it's easier to have all flutes with the same system of fingerings.
                              I have all sorts of keyed flute, and when I play the Soubeyran Kirst, I don't find the same scale in 3rd octave than with other flute.  That's all!
                              You shouldn't feel offended about that. I just say I am lazzy to change fingerings with each flute in each system, given that I already play 4 different fingering systems : renaissance, baroque, keyed and Boehm. So I prefer flutes, in each system, which are the closest to the standard.
                              Yours
                              Philippe
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Friday, April 02, 2004 7:39 PM
                              Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

                              Philippe, Boaz and co:
                               
                              At the risk of being branded a heretic, the best fingering for any flute is the one that is in tune at any given time - and in many cases it's useful to have a large repertoire of them at your fingertips (pardon the pun). When I was still a professional modern flute player, perish the thought ;), I had at least three fingering for every single note in the third register of the instrument. While many of these were commonly known by most professionals, I never ever found them notated in a published source. I can only assume, that with the existence of two different charts by Quantz, for example, that this multitude of fingering approaches and possiblities existed in previous times as well.
                               
                              Not a single flute I have every played is 'perfectly in tune' - indeed it is impossible for a flute to be 'perfectly in tune' at all times and in all situations. Orchestral playing is one of the most glaring example of that. As performers we have three choices - play the so-called 'right' fingering and contort ourselves to get it in tune (if at all), play it out of tune, or find another fingering that works.
                               
                              In my opinion, and it is only mine, the historical record is a tool, not the law.
                               
                              Cheers -
                               
                              Sonja Boon
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 11:23 PM
                              Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

                              Hi Sonia
                              I have also noticed that high F sharp is rather flat on this model and you can't play the original fingerings 12- 4--, nor 1-- 4--K
                              Claire makes also wonderful Tulou and Conical Boehm (Free advertisement), but these are not the right flutes for Beethoven Symphonies.
                              Also Kirst (stopped in 1804) or Heinrich Grenser (stopped in 1813) are not the right models to play latest symphonies as Boaz rightly argued. But I wonder whether Koch flutes are powerful enough for orchestra. Weren't they chamber flutes?
                              Sincerely
                              Philippe
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Friday, April 02, 2004 1:28 AM
                              Subject: Re: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

                              Hi Philippe:
                              > Ok but what about your high f sharp on Claire Kirst?,
                              > Which fingering do you use?
                              > Philippe Allain-Dupré

                              Like the one-keyed F sharp plus the short F.

                              Sonja Boon


                            • ardagh
                              Hi, I believe a good boxwood 4 keyed block mounted flute would be best some of the better ones were made by Bilton, also by Goulding, etc. John. ... From:
                              Message 14 of 18 , Apr 2, 2004
                                Hi,
                                I believe a good boxwood 4 keyed block mounted flute would be best some of the better ones were made by Bilton,
                                also by Goulding, etc.
                                John.
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2004 10:12 PM
                                Subject: [earlyflute] Best flute for Beethoven

                                1.What is the best flute for playing Beethoven? Does the most
                                historically accurate flute adaquetly meet the challenges of the
                                music, or is it best to use a flute from slightly after Beethoven's
                                death?

                                2. Does anyone know what flutes are being used in either the
                                Hogwood, Norrington, or Gardiner recordings of the Beethoven
                                Symphonies?

                                3. Which current flute maker makes the best Beethoven-appropriate
                                instrument, and how do they compare in price?

                                -David

                                http://mrdavidlross.com



                              • mailfrom.earlyflute.20.glauber@spamgourm
                                Awesome! I suffering from serious flutist envy here. I m going to order a copy of your CD (gratuitous commercial!) :-) http://www.vcn.bc.ca/~sboon/devienne/
                                Message 15 of 18 , Apr 3, 2004
                                  Awesome! I suffering from serious flutist envy here.

                                  I'm going to order a copy of your CD (gratuitous commercial!) :-)
                                  http://www.vcn.bc.ca/~sboon/devienne/
                                  What kind of flute do you play there?

                                  By the way, if you want to set a Web front for it, i've been very
                                  happy with CDBaby (http://www.cdbaby.com). They're very easy to deal
                                  with and not too expensive (another gratuitous commercial).

                                  g



                                  --- In earlyflute@yahoogroups.com, "Sonja Boon" <sboon@v...> wrote:
                                  > Hi Glauber:
                                  >
                                  > I play only period instruments in, for lack of better word, historically
                                  > informed performances....I can't speak for the others, though I've never
                                  > seen Boaz ever play anything metal in a modern group as long as I've
                                  known
                                  > him [hi boaz! :) ]
                                  >
                                  > so, when i play beethoven, it's on my kirst at A430 with a bunch of
                                  > like-minded souls as principal flute of the Portland Baroque
                                  Orchestra in
                                  > Oregon, USA or, with earlier music in a chamber setting, with my own
                                  > ensemble The Burney Ensemble in Vancouver, Canada, or a variety of other
                                  > groups around the West Coast....
                                  >
                                  > It may be worth mentioning that A430 is somewhat erroneous as
                                  well...and I'd
                                  > need to have Bruce Haynes's "The Story of A" at my side at all times
                                  to keep
                                  > all the pitch levels straight....
                                  >
                                  > Sonja Boon
                                  > www.vcn.bc.ca/~sboon/devienne
                                • Sonja Boon
                                  . ... Thanks for the plug :) I play a one keyed Grenser for the Devienne sonatas. Thanks for the tip about Cdbaby..I ll check it out :) Sonja Boon
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Apr 3, 2004
                                    .
                                    >
                                    > I'm going to order a copy of your CD (gratuitous commercial!) :-)
                                    > http://www.vcn.bc.ca/~sboon/devienne/
                                    > What kind of flute do you play there?
                                    >
                                    Thanks for the plug :)
                                    I play a one keyed Grenser for the Devienne sonatas.

                                    Thanks for the tip about Cdbaby..I'll check it out :)

                                    Sonja Boon
                                  • mailfrom.earlyflute.20.glauber@spamgourm
                                    ... That s what i have too, and i like this kind of flute very much. ... As i said, they re a small group, and easy to deal with (you can call and solve
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Apr 3, 2004
                                      --- In earlyflute@yahoogroups.com, "Sonja Boon" <sboon@v...> wrote:
                                      > .
                                      > >
                                      > > I'm going to order a copy of your CD (gratuitous commercial!) :-)
                                      > > http://www.vcn.bc.ca/~sboon/devienne/
                                      > > What kind of flute do you play there?
                                      > >
                                      > Thanks for the plug :)
                                      > I play a one keyed Grenser for the Devienne sonatas.

                                      That's what i have too, and i like this kind of flute very much.


                                      > Thanks for the tip about Cdbaby..I'll check it out :)

                                      As i said, they're a small group, and easy to deal with (you can call
                                      and solve problems on the phone quickly). It costs $35 and one CD to
                                      set up (they keep one CD as their copy, from the ones you send
                                      initially), then after that, they keep $4 per CD sold. They try to
                                      keep enough CDs on hand for 3-4 months, then email you when they need
                                      more. They handle shipping (US and international), returns, etc, and
                                      do a very good job of it. They set up a Web page for your CD with a
                                      picture of the cover and 2-minute samples from whatever tracks you
                                      tell them to (could be all tracks if you want). You get an email from
                                      them every time someone buys a CD, and you can download all sales
                                      information (names, emails, addreses) from them if you want. You can
                                      set up to get checks from them by mail or direct transfer into a bank
                                      account. I mostly like not having to handle shipping. And of course
                                      this allows people to buy your CDs with credit card or PayPal for no
                                      extra cost for you.

                                      There are other services too, like you can get a credit card swiper to
                                      use at gigs; or you can buy an UPS barcode for your CD if you need it
                                      (to sell through a distributor or Amazon.com).

                                      I'm not affiliated with them, just a happy user.

                                      g
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